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I was wondering if a nurse RN or a BSN can work in a certin field which one?

I want to be a nurse #registered-nurses

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Ashley’s Answer

I'm not sure I understand the question.... With an RN license there are many different fields in nursing you can work in. You can also get certified in those areas (such as psychiatric, oncology, pediatrics)

Thank you comment icon thank u ashley safina
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Marie’s Answer

I started my career in 1990. Even then they said they were getting rid of 2 year RN programs. As you can see that has not happened. Yes a BSN is ideal but finances may not allow for that track.i started with a 2 year degree (ADN).
As an ADN degree nurse with my specialty certification I was able to do anything I wanted. Charge nurse to house supervisor. I have done travel nursing at large hospitals. My degree never held me back.
I took me until 2014 to finally complete my BSN. I immediately went on to obtain my MSN because I wanted to teach. Hospitals today that want magnet status will require a BSN. With the nursing shortage, they will hire qualified nurses regardless of degree status.
If you do get your ADN , I recommend going immediately into an online BSN program, if finances allow. After 2 years get your certification. Build your resume and you can do anything you desire.
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Marcia’s Answer

You can get an associates degree but lately a lot of hospitals are requiring BSN; so I would recommend just going for your BSN. I’ve done well with my associates degree but I have less options for employment than someone with a BSN or higher.
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Linda Hassan’s Answer

Hello Ashley,

I appreciate your question on studying for Registered Nurse (RN) degree to launch your career in healthcare. I can tell you from an academic standpoint more nursing programs are designing academic studies for the higher-level nursing degrees. For example, 4-year degree nursing programs will earn you a Batchelor's of Science in Nursing (BSN) . I highly reccomend aiming for education to earn an BSN. After graduating from your nursing program with a BSN, you will take the nursing board examination called the NCLEX. Passing the NCLEX (National Council Licensure Examination) will give you the license to practice as a Registered Nurse.

Once you become a Registered Nurse (RN) you can work towards a Master's in Nursing (MSN). Many schools are now trying to get students to enroll in the Bachelor's in Nursing (BSN) to Doctorate in Nurse Practice (DNP) track. While training to be a RN is difficult and many hours of studying, I believe that you will find the rewards in many ways over your lifetime. As a nursing student you are investing your time and studies for a lifetime of opportunities.

The lower level nursing license is called the License Practical Nurse (LPN) and this level of educational training is fading out. Nursing faculty are seeing the LPN role as less mobile and less flexible for the needs of the healthcare system, which is more complex to navigate. Our healthcare system has many barriers to patient care and patients are dealing with more complicated and chronic health conditions than ever before.

Healthcare needs more highly trained nurses caring for patients who present with multiple high-risk health issues -- along with complicated socio-economic and mental health issues. I am a strong proponent to prepare today's nurses with a higher-level education, which will prepare you for the front-lines of demanding patient care and nursing administration. I believe you will be more confident in your profession (clinical assessment and organizational skills) and there will be more options for you in your career over your lifetime. I see hospitals phasing out the LPN role, and believe that you will be faced with limited options. As a Registered Nurse, your salary will be higher and higher over the lifetime of your career.

As a RN, you can advance your career by obtaining specialty certifications in nursing such as Certified Case Manager (CCM), Certified Diabetic Educator (CDE), AIDS Certified Registered Nurse (ACRN), Certified Pediatric Nurse (CPN), Advanced Oncology Certified Nurse (AOCN), and Family Nurse Practitioner.... to name a few. My idea here is to consider your longterm life goals and future opportunities in nursing. You will have many many more options as a Registered Nurse to advance your career and develop new interests. Please reach out if you need further guidance. Best of luck to you!!
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Tamika’s Answer

The BSN just stands for Bachelor of Science in Nursing, that is still a RN. A RN has many fields of medicine to choice from, so make sure you do a lot of research to see what interest you.
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