Skip to main content
5 answers
7
Asked 1795 views

Can you describe the hardest welding challenge?

I am very interested in the welding field. I have welded once and it was fun. i am looking to find out as much as i can about welding. Any suggestions, tips, or advice would be great. #welding

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

7

5 answers


4
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brian’s Answer

I started welding 10 years ago in my apprenticeship. The toughest part was actually learning how to strike up the arc without sticking the rod. Perseverance, patience, and practice help. Patience is probably one of the biggest challenges.

One of my greatest accomplishments in my field, was TIG welding 10” sch 160 pipe. There was a screw up in the print and the valve was installed backwards. We had to cut it apart with the machinist and reprep the pipe and valves. After all said and done, the gap was about 3/4” of an inch. I had to come up with a way to feed wire into the joint and not have any imperfections for X-ray. Needless to say, I sealed it up, filled and capped it off flawlessly. Although I did fight the joint the whole way, having the patience to endure was the biggest challenge.

So I say to you, if you get the chance, put in some time. Don’t get frustrated. Just keep trying until you become proficient. Sometimes it’s baby steps. You don’t jump into the ocean without knowing how to swim. Learn what you can from someone or through a welding program. Take what they teach you, if it doesn’t work for you, try a variation of it to work for you. If that works, make it your own.

Best of luck

Brian Foley
4
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Richard’s Answer

I started welding at 8 years old when I wanted to build a go-cart. My grandpa sawed 12 foot steel tubing 6 inches sections and made me weld it back together. He bent each weld 90 degrees and if any of them broke I had to start over.
That’s a pretty tough challenge!
Took a long time, but I eventually built that go-cart! (... then my brothers took it. )

I haven’t welded In decades but your question was interesting and unanswered... so until a pro comes along with a more definitive and experienced answer....let’s explore!

Welderstation.com defines these as the types of welding ....
MIG - Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)
TIG - Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)
Stick - Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)
Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW)
Energy Beam Welding (EBW)
Atomic Hydrogen Welding (AHW)
Gas Tungsten-Arc Welding
Plasma Arc Welding

I would suggest that “friction welding” should be added to the list ... and if you aren’t melting the base metal to fuse it, also add brazing and soldering.

I don’t know where oxy-acetaline is used but I tried it once and it was intense!

When I read your question the first answer to come to mind is “most difficult” would be TIG. It takes a whole bunch of practice.. it’s fun to learn but frustrating...generally, your going to need to control the filler rod with one hand , the torch with another, and the amount of heat with a foot...
So TIG is more precise and clean and often stronger because you have more control. It’s slow and requires skill, though.

Ok that said... your question wouldn’t be fully answered without exploring materials... you would think a exotic metal like titanium would be the most challenging... but most sources say good ol aluminum it the most challenging. I suggest that welding two different metals is a nightmare .

Ok that said said... environment adds to challenge. I suggest hyperbaric welding , underwater especially, is your nightmare welding challenge... because of heat conduction and water/pressure which oxidizes things and makes melting and beading near impossible. Also... your going to pump 300+ amps of electricity into the water your swimming in! How crazy is that?

I’ve done limited welding both mig and TIG and I even made some money on the side to help with tuition. But I’m by no means a pro... so hopefully someone with more professional training and experience will come along and expand on this exploration.

Good luck to ya

Rich “mig pilot” Wolf



Richard recommends the following next steps:

Google each type of welding mentioned
Look up why aluminum is so challenging
Spend a day at a welding shop
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Stephen’s Answer

The hardest welding is typically trying to join two different metals, like steel and aluminum, this cant be done by regular welding so we had to have parts sent out and explosion welded to join the two materials. Welding is a skill and the more you do it the better you will get so that the things you think are impossible when you start become routine with enough practice.
Some of the hardest challenges are finding opportunity to learn to weld. Welding can be stressful, depending on what you're working on you can have you welds tested daily. Every welder I know fails has failed a welding test, in one way or another. Many jobs even require welders to test in before they are hired and those are high pressure situations that can be very challenging.
If you're looking for a challenging career, welding could be a good option. From basic shop welding, to high pressure field welding there are constant ways to continually challenge and seek out new skills in welding. If you want to you can do it though, there are people there to help teach and train you, and non of the tasks are designed to be to challenging to accomplish.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jeffrey’s Answer

I would say the hardest challenge to any new welder is 'patience'. It takes time to become a really good welder; even longer to advance your career as a welding inspector, welding supervisor or welding auditor. But it is most definitely worth it.

Jeffrey recommends the following next steps:

Look for a local welding school that offers a 12-week course. Many choose the community college route, but it takes two years to learn what you could in 3 months, and leaves you with a bigger debt to pay off.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James’s Answer

Mine was probably which type of welding I wanted to do... so I chose to do them all. Or at least try.
0