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Explain what is the difference between Crankshaft and Camshaft?

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Shekar’s Answer

Hi Daniel,

here are the differences you asked for

CAMSHAFT - Located in the “top end” of an engine, the camshaft is a critical part of the valve train that allows air and fuel to enter the combustion chamber (the space above a piston) and exhaust gases out after they burn. A modern internal combustion engine (IC) can have up to four camshafts — or dual cams — with four valves per cylinder (two intake and two exhaust), while a single-cam setup has only one of each valve.

CRANKSHAFT - Located in the “bottom end” of an engine, the crankshaft harnesses the tremendous force of combustion (the violent burning of the air and fuel in the combustion chamber) by thrusting the pistons downward, causing the crankshaft to rotate. This rotation is the power source of an engine.

How do they Wok?

CAMSHAFT - Driven by the crankshaft, a camshaft transfers motion from the cams through various parts of the valve train (valve lifter, pushrod, valve spring, valve and tappet or rocker arm) to open and close engine valves. Cam lobes come in different shapes and sizes to control how much a valve opens and for how long. A four-camshaft configuration increases power. With more valves, more intake and exhaust gases can move more easily because there is more space for them to flow through.

CRANKSHAFT - Connecting rods attach pistons to the crankshaft. Combustion, controlled precisely by ignition and valve timing, exerts massive downward pressure on the pistons allowing the crankshaft to maintain its rotational momentum.


:)

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Shekar’s Answer

Hi Daniel,

here are the differences you asked for

CAMSHAFT - Located in the “top end” of an engine, the camshaft is a critical part of the valve train that allows air and fuel to enter the combustion chamber (the space above a piston) and exhaust gases out after they burn. A modern internal combustion engine (IC) can have up to four camshafts — or dual cams — with four valves per cylinder (two intake and two exhaust), while a single-cam setup has only one of each valve.

CRANKSHAFT - Located in the “bottom end” of an engine, the crankshaft harnesses the tremendous force of combustion (the violent burning of the air and fuel in the combustion chamber) by thrusting the pistons downward, causing the crankshaft to rotate. This rotation is the power source of an engine.

How do they Wok?

CAMSHAFT - Driven by the crankshaft, a camshaft transfers motion from the cams through various parts of the valve train (valve lifter, pushrod, valve spring, valve and tappet or rocker arm) to open and close engine valves. Cam lobes come in different shapes and sizes to control how much a valve opens and for how long. A four-camshaft configuration increases power. With more valves, more intake and exhaust gases can move more easily because there is more space for them to flow through.

CRANKSHAFT - Connecting rods attach pistons to the crankshaft. Combustion, controlled precisely by ignition and valve timing, exerts massive downward pressure on the pistons allowing the crankshaft to maintain its rotational momentum.


:)

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Michael’s Answer

When the fuel ignites in the cylinders, it forces the pistons down. Pistons are connected to the crank shaft by connecting rods. As pistons are forced down it causes the crankshaft to rotate. Cam shaft is connected by a belt, a chain, or gears to the crankshaft. As crank shaft turn it turns the cam shaft. The cam shaft has lobes which push valves open allowing air into the cylinders and exhaust out of the cylinders.

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