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How can you determine what career is best for you?

Building things and finding solutions to problems are things I like as well as being able to help people. I plan on opening a business whether it is in auto mechanics or construction.
#construction #business #automotive #career

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Doc’s Answer

My professional advice Domenica, is to do your best to find a combination of a career that taps into your passion as well as one that will be viable in the future.

HOW TO FIND THE ANSWER TO "WHAT CAREER IS BEST FOR ME"
Look at the flip side of your weaknesses. If there is something you hate to do, look at its opposite. For example, if organizational ability is not one of your strengths, you may be better suited to a less structured, perhaps designing cars where creativity is a higher priority than organization. If working in an garage makes you feel claustrophobic, perhaps you would prefer working outdoors in constuction.

When you’re wondering “what career of the two is right for me?” it’s best to think about the intersection between what you’re good at, what work is need most or what the world needs, and what you enjoy doing. The overlap between those three areas is your sweet spot, your career. Also, think about the overall work environment of the two different careers you’re considering. Do you thrive when you’re moving around all day or when you get uninterrupted time to work? Do you like a predictable schedule or variety? Do you enjoy interacting with others or having solo time to work on projects? Think about when you’ve done your best work and felt your best and use that as a guide to narrow what type of career might be best for you.

CONDUCT INTERVIEWS
Separately, research helps! If you know someone in a field you’re thinking about, ask if they’ll have a short coffee with you (your treat) to discuss the day-to-day duties of the job. Interviewing itself is another good way to figure out what career is right for you. You can learn a lot about jobs by being interviewed for them, and an interview often forces you to boil down your interests and skills even if it ends up not being a good fit.

THE SHADOW KNOWS
If you aren’t sure what you’d enjoy, ask people you know if you can shadow them for a day at their job. Find out what they love most about their job, what they like the least. If they could change one thing about it, what would they change? What is their work-life balance like? What about their stress levels? Are they constantly working on deadlines, or is their work more predictable and at a slower pace?

CAN YOU PREDICT THE FUTURE
Lastly, even with your current skills and interests that are driving your present career aspirations, count on these changing over time and, therefore, leading to ever-changing career interests. Consider, a recent study revealed that millennials jump at least four times in their first decade out of college; as a result, it’s important to know that in choosing careers you need to reflect on where you see yourself in five years.

Hope this was helpfull Domenica
Thank you comment icon Thank You Elwira. “Help one another. There’s no time like the present, and no present like the time.” – James Durst Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Christopher. “I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.” – Edward Everett Hale Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Jeff. “If you become a helper of hearts, springs of wisdom will flow from your heart.” – Rumi Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Cassandra. “Volunteers are the only human beings on the face of the earth who reflect this nation’s compassion, unselfish caring, patience, and just plain loving one another.” – Erma Bombeck Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Ricardo. “The broadest, and maybe the most meaningful definition of volunteering: Doing more than you have to because you want to, in a cause you consider good. ” – Ivan Scheier Doc Frick
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Bobby’s Answer

One thing to consider is that you don't need to determine your career path at one moment in time. Even if you feel that you've started in one career it doesn't mean you're locked into that path forever.

After high school, I felt that I was definitely going down one path, went to college for it, and my first job out of school was in that field. I found out it wasn't for me and stopped working there after a few months. It's been 13 years and none of my work since then has been directly related to what I focused on in school. But it wasn't a waste - everything I learned and have experienced has helped me in some way.

Think about what you feel is right for your future and also what you feel passionate about. Take your education seriously and know that everything you do is a learning experience. Talk to people who have already opened up businesses or who work in the fields you are interested in, and ask them how they've gotten where they are. What steps did they take, what do they like, what were the challenges they faced?

Feel free to explore and don’t stress out about "choosing" your career because it will find you.
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Ricardo’s Answer

Hi Domenica,
I see that you already have lots of great points of view and valuable answers, so I am going to be brief.
I will say that it can be useful if you visualize yourself professionally speaking at a 5, 10, 15 years from now and think what you can be doing on a normal day. It would be necessary to define a hobby and a passion between Automotive vs Construction.
You can select a career by thinking if you can use it as a tool that would bring you closer to what you would like to be doing in a future.
Ideally, If you have a passion, make that passion your common everyday work.
I hope this ideas can clarify your situation, thank you.
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Jeff’s Answer

Hello,

This is a good question and a hard one for even me to answer. What I recommend you do is to answer some of the below questions and sit with a mentor to review them once completed. For me when I did this activity, I started writing down what I was passionate about personally then I tried to answer for my professional life. Once completed you should be able to identify patterns of what excites you and your area of interests for potential Career opportunities.

Your Career Plans

• What are you passionate about?

• What do you love to do?

• What strengths do you leverage?

• What are you excited to learn?

• What do you value most?

• What are your career interests?

• What do you want to be doing 2-5 years from now?

• What experience and exposure should be on your plan to make you “ready now” for the type of work you aspire to do?

• What conversations do you need to have with your manager, mentor and others?

Good Luck! :)
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Christina’s Answer

Business Administration is a good degree to have to go into various areas of business. Many folks have gotten this degree and then moved into an interested area of business that they learned about in college. Marketing, Advertising, Accounting, etc. What do you like math, sales, customer service? Find out what you love to do through business electives at college. Then work with your college advisors to chart a course a successful degree program.
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Deepak’s Answer

The answer you are looking for is in your passion.
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Heather’s Answer

Hi Domenica,

Your question is very common, as very few young students know exactly what they want to do ! I am not sure if you are a high school or college student, but I encourage you to keep searching and asking yourself what you like to do, and don't like to do. As so many others have said in this forum, it's wise to find a job you love, and the money will follow! I would suggest searching for "Career Direction Test" to see ideas of what you might enjoy. Then, do some research in those fields that sound interesting. What type of education is necessary? How likely is it to find a job in this field? Is the salary projection what you are looking for? Take a look at the job rankings on US News and World Report (https://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/rankings/the-100-best-jobs) for additional information. Then, once you have settled on a direction, try a class or two and see how you like it.

Keep searching for something that makes you happy! It's out there, I promise! Best of luck to you!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the suggestion Domenica
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Cristina’s Answer

Hi Domenica!

This a great question! There are many options, and it is best to start by exploring them. I took a career exploration class in community college that changed my life! I was able to take career assessments and explore different careers. I was able to determine that I wanted to become a college counselor to be able to help other students through their academic journey. I see that you already have some interests picked out so you can start by doing a little research on those areas. I have suggested some steps for you to take in no particular order. Good luck :)

Cristina recommends the following next steps:

Visit the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) and the O*NET websites to do your own research on the topics you listed: auto mechanics and construction.
Take career exploration assessments found online.
Look into career exploration courses at your community college.
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Bert’s Answer

It's often said that if you do what you love, you never will have to work a day in your life. While not everyone starts off in their dream job, we all have the ability to learn from every experience and figure out what truly makes us feel productive and fulfilled. If you are fortunate enough to have studied subjects, or selected a major, that you love, then you already may be on your way to finding the right career for you. Approach every opportunity with a sense of curiosity and a desire to learn. Ask questions and learn from those who are more experienced. Find one or two people who appear to be doing things you would like to do, or who have achieved things you would like to achieve, and ask them if they would be willing to mentor you. As those relationships progress, and the level of trust builds, they will feel comfortable telling you their personal likes and dislikes about their profession, which also will help you get a feel for what areas may appeal to you. Ask your mentors for honest feedback, whether positive or negative. This will be a critical part of your personal and professional growth. Read about the aspects of your chosen industry that interest you and seek out certifications. Not only will that make you more marketable, but as you continue to learn, you will gravitate towards those things that interest you. Finally, seek out networking events and conferences that are geared towards your interests. Those types of events will expose you to greater amounts of people and information than you typically have available to you. All of those factors will allow you to learn more about your options and figure out what really motivates you and brings you personal satisfaction.
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Claudia’s Answer

Domenica, follow your passion. Look at what things/activities you enjoy the most to do, those that makes you wake up willing to do them.
It´s a really difficult choice for everyone but think that you can always change it or study another career so don´t overstressed about it.

My own experience: I chose International Business and after 3 classes in my first day, I noticed that it was not for me so I went to the school office and asked for the careers list and chose one, asked for the change ( I had a terrible first semester schedule cause they were few available classes) and now I am an industrial engineer. Im grateful that I realized it in that moment even when the decision was so quick, I follow my instinct. :)
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Justina’s Answer

I would start by asking, what is my passion, interest, strengths, what do I love to do most? Then think of careers that might align with your passion. Also talk to a mentor, who could also help guide you in selecting a career. That said, as you grow career interest might also change, and that’s ok. What I would say, whatever you decide to do, try and do it to your best. And don’t be afraid of the unknown.
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Scott’s Answer

The most important thing is to find an area of interest you enjoy doing and then make sure it is something you can establish a professional career in. Once you have established your area of interest, check on what kind of skills, experience, and needed education you will need to have. Find out if there are any internships or possible jobs you can work at while you are attending school and acquiring new skills for your career choice. Review the future trends in your career choice. Most importantly, make sure your career choice is something you will continue to enjoy working in professionally long term.
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Patricia’s Answer

Hi Domenica,

Thanks for the question! To accomplish what I have thus far, I was focused on developing goals and then sticking to them. I also had people who would hold me accountable. It also helps to have a job that you like doing and people you enjoy working with so that it doesn't seem like a job!

If you're planning to open your own business, I would suggest starting with a well-developed business plan and to vet it with those whose opinion you trust. Also, find a current business person as see if he/she can be your mentor.

Whatever path you take, wish you MUCH success!!

Take care, be well, and stay safe!

Patricia'
Thank you comment icon Thank you for answering my question. Domenica
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Samantha’s Answer

Think about the things you like and how that might translate into different careers. That is the best place to start - my daughter loves writing and being creative so doing a job like marketing within a business setting would give her an opportunity to use those skills. For myself, I tried a bunch of different things within the Finance and Accounting field and over time I figured out what I like.
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Yvonne’s Answer

Hi Domenica,

That's a great question. It can be a long journey or a short one. It really depends on your own experience and what you need to do for yourself and/or your family.

I thought college was going to help me figure that out but it turns out, it just made me more confused. I believe finding a career is about knowing yourself and uncovering what you like doing, what you're good at, what the world will pay for, and what the world needs or what your community needs. Below is a link of a venn diagram that really helped me think through what a desired career path would be.

https://i2.wp.com/www.yvonnetran.co/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/intersections.jpg?w=640

Also, understand that you may be multiple careers in your life so don't put too much pressure on your "first" career. A lot of us now have not only two careers but three or four. Just remember what can make you happy (even on a spectrum) and what you can make to support yourself and your family.
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Will’s Answer

The short answer is it may take some time. As you grow and learn more your ideas of what you want to do may change. If your not sure what your passion is at your age that's perfectly normal. The best advice I could give is to really take stock of what you enjoy, from there you can explore what options are available, join diverse clubs and organizations to see what might be available. You can always develop skills you maybe lacking later through education and training. If you can figure out what you want to do then you can figure out how to do it.
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