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Is there a military option on here ?

My name is coriean, I want to join the army and build my career as a special operations soldier. I suggest anyone who wants to join the military talk to all 5 branches before you go. Cause originally I was going into the marines but there benefits arent good they wont really take care of me like the army will!! #army #military

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Mitchell’s Answer

If you're joining for the benefits of college, healthcare, or the like, every branch is going to offer largely identical programs. If the question is will one branch "take care of me" more than another, there is no answer. Each branch has benefits and drawbacks. I happened to have chosen to join the Navy, but I have happy friends in each branch. It boils down mostly to your interests.

In the Navy, I work with computer systems and radio communications. I chose that particular field because of my interest in computer science. Sometimes, I talk with friends in the Air Force that do the same thing and it sounds great. I've worked alongside marines and soldiers that do similar things as well. But if you like computers, the Navy and Air Force have a lot of opportunities. People that are mechanically inclined may enjoy the Army or Marine Corps more, although every branch has both ground and air vehicles that need maintaining.

All in all, talk to each reruiter, see which branch can offer you which jobs, and pick something that you find interesting based on your own research. The reality is that recruiters want to get you to enlist, so they can bend the reality of different jobs to seem more appealing than they are. Go online and talk to some active duty folks and get a real feel for each community. It will take time and effort, but if you stay open minded and put in the work, you'll spend years (maybe decades) of your life happier for it. Good luck!

Mitchell recommends the following next steps:

Contact any recruiter and take the ASVAB (standardized military entrance test)
Bring your ASVAB results to every branch
Compare offered jobs to your interests and compile a "short list" of viable options
Research your "short list" on your own, and choose your branch and job from there.
Raise your right hand and prepare for a crazy ride!
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Rick’s Answer

Yes you must check all branches of service to include the new Space Forces. This will allow you to get the most information to make a very important decision in your life. Remember certain things when you speak to the recruiters;
1. Ask them what they have to offer you in line of work for what you want to do as a career after the service.
2. Ask them what are the chance and normal time frames for advancement within their branch of service.
3. Ask them if the Officer or Enlisted route is best for what you want to do and be in the future.
4. Ask them what you can do if you want to change your career field and when that can be done.

Asking yourself some of these type of questions before you go in to the recruited is also very important to get answered. Remember to be flexible and realistic.

I loved my career in the Army and would not have went into the field I did without persisting that I wanted some type of skill that would transfer into a civilian life after my tour. So there are many options out there don't just jump onto the first one that sounds fun.
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Luis’s Answer

Coriean,

I believe you were misguided in that one specific branch will not take care of you. (Marines) Overall all branches offer the same benefits when it comes to education and medical. Pay is the same across the board and its based of your rank/ pay grade. Rules and regulations across the branches is whats different which causes a different environment.

I highly recommend you researching the military occupational specialties within the branches to see if you find something fitting. I understand that you would like a career in special operations. My recommendation is to consider a career that will provide you an easy transition to the civilian sector. In the event that you do not make the military a career.

I hope this answers your question. I retired from the military and served among both enlisted ranks and officer ranks. If I can be of further assistance please advise.

Respectfully,
Luis Concepcion

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Nicole’s Answer

This is a really hard question to answer, strictly because this question can make vets get very passionate about their branch they served. It will mainly boil down to what you want to get out of your military career and how do you want to be promoted.

Not every branch will give you the same options of duty stations, and neither will every job. So it is important when researching these things to have an idea of where you want to go and what you want to do as a career (if that is a big concern for you not to get stuck somewhere out in the boonies for 4 years). I asked my recruiter, "because I want to go to Texas what job titles are stationed there?" etc. This can equally be applied to what branch and add the added bonus of what job titles are stationed there to help you decide.

When you consider choosing your job title (MOS), consider how this will help of hurt you after your career in the military. Most people still work after they retire from the military because retirement comes so quick in the military (20 years) so even if you wish to be a lifer this is a serious question to ask yourself. I see people all the time say they wanted to just blow things up, join the infantry and then when they get out they didn't do school while they were in either so they don't have a lot of options other then FBI or Police Forces to join with the skills they gained. I joined the Army as an Air Defense Artillery Operator Maintainer (14J) and I was lucky I got my job as a network assurance engineer because typically only soldiers trained in a signal unit get this type of job, before this I was told my skills didn't apply for a lot of technical jobs so I had to work as a sales associate until I did school and found an opportunity doing what I love, tech. So definitely research your job options in each branch after you take your ASVAB if you can.

The Army is wonderful! My recruiter was 100% honest with me so I was fully prepared for the craziness that I experienced. However all branches have their ups and downs, and in my opinion one is not better then the other. The Air Force did get more funding typically when I signed up in 2010 but not sure if this is still true. I do know their standard of living in the "dorms" is much better then the potentially WWII barracks you may reside in in the Army, as well as the Air Force gets added hazard duty pay when you are stationed in certain living conditions in war zones versus the Army and other branches... not so much. You also are forced out of communal (dorms/barracks) living until you are an E4 rank (automatic after 2 years service if you maintain a good rap sheet) in the Air Force, versus the Army you have to be E6 or married to do that. E6 is Staff Sergeant and you have to pass two boards to get and is not granted automatically, some people never get promoted to this either by choice or not.

Physical fitness tests are different too. When I joined I couldn't do a pull up to save my life, and still couldn't for several years after so I knew I should not join the Marines as it was part of their PT test while the Army was only push ups/sit ups/2 mile run (at the time). So if physical fitness requirements can be something to consider too.

I looked at how you make rank as my tie breaker. The pay and living outside of the barracks at E4 was not a huge game winner to go Air Force for me. I chose the Army due to the fact that when I wish to be promoted I only need to get recommended by my superiors, and then pass a board where your leadership asks you about 10 to 20 general questions from the Army Study Guide and if you pass and have the points you get promoted. The Air Force you need to be recommended and go to a board sure, but you also have to test out and wait 6 months after you test to make your rank unless someone expedites you. I am an immediate gratification type of person so I didn't like this process and chose to go Army.

I hope this helps consider some benefit differences.
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Jonny’s Answer

Selecting the appropriate military branch is crucial for your success. Numerous individuals discover their calling in the Air Force, which often presents a smoother path to success compared to more demanding branches such as the Marine Corps. However, it's vital to understand that each branch in the military has its distinct culture and caters to different personality types. Therefore, your choice should be based on your personal preferences and career goals in the military. Remember, your success is largely determined by your decisions and actions.
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