Skip to main content
6 answers
6
Asked 609 views

What classes would you take in high school to prepare for collage.

As I said in my last question, I want to do something with computers, PowerPoint or video editing maybe. Those could still change, but for you personally which classes did you take, if you can remember, when you were in high school before you became a video editor or a person that helps with PowerPoint-like things.
#computer #college #powerpoint #videoediting

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

6 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

David’s Answer

There is really not any class or classes to prepare you for course or major in computer for college, because if you are planning to focus or major in computer or do something in computer you will definitely need to know the basic of computer such as Microsoft office, some software program (video editing, photo editing, design, drawing and etc.), function of the computer, operating system and etc. Cause when you start college and focus on computer science, you will be going into a deeper understanding and break down of each software, hardware, program, and etc. So if you are already expose to these software or program you can youtube or google for the mean time to learn about the function and usage of these software or program. Cause I was a computer and gamer when I was in high school and when I was in college I took some elective computer courses as it is require as part of my course works.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rosie’s Answer

Hi Roger!
You ask a very good question, and it is awesome you are looking ahead to prepare you for your next steps in college and career. It is never to early too start preparing and testing out your knowledge now, so you can have a better idea of what you are wanting to do later on.

First, I would speak with your school counselor. See what classes or electives that they currently offer that aligns with these skills. They are a great resource and can point you in the right direction to make sure you are getting the credits you need to complete your high school career, while obtaining some great skills. Also, check with them to see if your school supports a dual credit sort of program. Some high schools will allow you to take college classes at your local community college or university and they are free to you as a high school student. This is a great way to get some pre-requisite courses out of the way in general. If they do support that program, meet with an advisor and see what options you have to get into that sort of degree and classes that would be available to you that might expand your skills and knowledge in the areas you are most interested in.

Secondly, If you do not have the above option at your finger tips, consider looking into LinkedIn Learning. They offer some great resources and training for the sort of skills you are looking to improve upon. There is a monthly membership fee, but it is definitely worth it if you are seriously considering this sort of career. For basic support, but still a good starting ground with Power Point, try Office Support. They will walk you through a lot of different tools inside the software and it is self paced.

The last thing I would say is practice! If you have Office on your computer at home, start creating decks, and putting together slides. Look through template designs and start understanding the in's and out's of the software. Make a Power Point for you weekly schedule, and what it entails, or set a goal for yourself and outline it using the deck. You can even set your science projects up that way and creating hypothesis. Get creative and once you start using it, you will be able to navigate with ease.

Good luck!
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Dexter’s Answer

Hi Roger,

Thinking back to my high school days, I took lots of AP courses centered around math and sciences, which allowed me to get into a college that I wanted. So I would encourage to take school seriously (though if you're asking questions in here, I'm sure you already are) and get good grades. If you have that down, then I would recommend taking transferable college courses from your local community college to get a head start.

I took like 3 community college courses while I was in highschool and the one I would recommend the most was "Speech 1". I haven't worked in a role that does lots of public speaking, but I use the things I learned in that course on a weekly basis. I use good habits and strategies based on what I learned in that course when I speak to colleagues, lead meetings, and create presentations. That course also helped me in upper level college courses, as those courses had group presentations.

Oh and if you still have more free time after that, I would encourage you to just be curious about technology in general and learn things that interest you. No one know if we'll still be using power point in 10 years (highly likely, but still), so it's good to be a generally technical person that knows many different technologies. In high school, I remember messing around with Linux, and who knew that it'd be so important to businesses now. I mean, if I didn't pick up some basic linux fundamentals in high school, I wouldn't have been able to contribute to my research projects in college, and I'm not sure if I would have gotten my first job in desktop support. Like so, I think it'd be good for you to get interested in technology and learn various projects/products.

Anyways, I wish you the best of luck!

--
Dexter
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

fariha’s Answer

Don't stop taking math classes, as it's a skill you'll need for college and thereafter! Being fluent in Microsoft Office will also make your life a lot easier.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Morgan ☁’s Answer

See if your school works with a local trade or vocational school.
Also check if there are any 'study tips' electives you can take, as well as time management.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Anna’s Answer

Hey Roger! It is great that you are wanting to get a head start in high school, I did the same and it can be extremely helpful. Firstly, depending on whether or not you are just going for certification or if you are going for a full degree with general education courses, my suggestion would be to look into College Credit Plus courses first. You may not be able to do computer science courses, but you can knock those gen-eds right out of the park and leave more room for your computer courses once you are actually in college. My brother is a computer science graduate, and he took most of his gen-eds in high school; I did the same, and I am actually graduating a year early because of it. But, whether or not you need gen-eds, I would also check out Coursera. It is a site that connects you with different universities that offer intro computer science courses (yes, I checked) for free. You may need to pay between $30-$50 for the course, but in my mind (especially compared to the cost of tuition) it is absolutely worth it to either take some early comp-sci courses or just familiarize yourself with it before you go to school full-time for it. Hope this helps!
0