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How do you put down an animal? How do you deal with the emotional aspects?

I ask this because i wana become a vet. but I don't wana hurt or kill an animal. #veterinarian #veterinary #animal #college #career #career-counseling

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Jane Elizabeth’s Answer

Hello, The method used to put an animal down (euthanize it) actually depends on the species and can vary widely. For dogs and cats, the primary method is the animal is sedated with a quick intramuscular injection and then an IV catheter may be placed for better access but may not always be possible. Then a non painful overdose of pentobarbital is given. Cardiac and respiratory arrest usually happen in 30 seconds.
I'm lucky that I only euthanize sick animals and while this still causes me pain, I know I am preventing the animal from further suffering, usually for a medical issue that can not be fixed.
I vowed to myself when I first started practice that the first day a euthanasia doesn't bother me, is the last day I practice. I believe it's important to take each euthanasia seriously.
This is a very difficult aspect of veterinary medicine but for many suffering animals, this is the only way to end the pain they are experiencing.
Hopefully, large animal and exotic vets will chime in and answer more about current methods in euthanizing other species.
Honestly, the harder thing for me in veterinary medicine is watching neglect that doesn't qualify as abuse and seeing animals suffer preventable diseases. This is actually much more common than euthanasias.
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Steve’s Answer

Hema, I had to put my border collie to sleep last month, just short of his 16th birthday. He was a wonderful pet, beloved by everyone in the neighborhood. I nursed him through two years of cancer, but he finally got so weak he couldn't stand long enough to eat. In addition to his own pain and weakness, I'm sure it disturbed him to see me crying nonstop.

I thought that his long illness would have prepared me for this, but I was so devastated. My veterinarian, however, was really kind. He tactfully suggested a few days before my decision that he thought it was time for euthanization, and he stayed patient until I was ready. He told me that he actually liked this part of his job because it allows him to help animals avoid unnecessary suffering.

I'm sure the first few times you need to do this will be difficult, but I believed what my vet said about finding this aspect of his work meaningful.
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Abigail’s Answer

Hello!
First off I would like to say great career choice. I am actually in school right now to be a wildlife conservationist. Obviously it isn't the same thing as being a vet, but I do get to work with animals. I understand where you are coming from about not wanting to hurt or kill animals. However, sometimes it just comes with the job. Euthanization is a way of putting an animal down that doesn't hurt them in any way. That is most commonly used in a vet setting. I worked in a vet setting for some time as an intern and it was hard for me to see that as well. I totally get it. I think overtime it does get better the longer you are in a vet setting. I hope you become a vet and I wish you the best!
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