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How do you incorporate feedback into designs?

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Steven’s Answer

Be sure to intently listen to the feedback you're receiving and try to understand the root cause of their concerns. Sometimes an overly prescriptive set of feedback isn't always the right answer and you can find an even better solution that makes them happier!

To display a super simplified example scenario - if a client mentions your text is the wrong size and they can't read it, you could bump up the size but it could also be that the colors are off and there isn't enough contrast, it could be that they need different letting, it could be placement. Do some digging and critical thinking!

There are many solutions to a problem given and it's important in your career for any issue to take a step back, understand the root causes, and work with them to reach a solution you're both happy with. The number one goal isn't to meet your clients every need and whim and demand, but to present the best possible product/experience/graphic to whoever will be using your designs. Hope this helps!
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Katherine’s Answer

When you accept the opinions of others and change the design direction, you will get inspiration
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Joe’s Answer

Great question Nasiah.

First, I believe a great designer is a great listener. When receiving feedback, I try to be neutral and objective. I fully listen to the person's comments and reflect back on my work at the same time, with this fresh new perspective coming from this person's viewpoint. I respect they took time to give me feedback and value their opinion.

I am also trying to understand their point of view, I put myself into the person's shoes for a second. That helps me comprehend their perspective and better judge the feedback.

Ideally, the feedback is coming from the targeted audience of what you are designing for. That would be a great opportunity to understand them more and build empathy. You'll be better informed to which part of their feedback you should act upon and will make better design decisions to answer their needs in the future. Even if it comes directly from the targeted audience though, sometimes they might not even know exactly what they need, it is our jobs as designers to identify it, cut through the noise and find valuable information that will better serve them.

If it comes from a different source, I would advise not trying to please everyone, but be sure to remember who you are designing for, what you are designing, and why. If the feedback is in line with that, it worth paying close attention and incorporate it into your work.

I hope that helps! Good luck and success.
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Lydia’s Answer

Some great answers here. I would add:

• Don't take feedback personally. Stay neutral and avoid getting defensive. Build up your own self-awareness abilities if you struggle here.
• Be clear in your own understanding of your design rationale. Know why you made certain design decisions, and think about that as you listen to and receive the feedback.
• Let the audience know what kind of feedback you are looking for. Is this an early draft and you just high-level directional feedback? Or, is this farther along and you want to get into the nitty gritty details? Knowing and articulating this will help keep the conversation focused.
• Try to listen and understand what's at the heart of the feedback. Sometimes a client might say "I don't like that color blue." when they really mean that the blue is making the design look too heavy or unbalanced. Asking why and for clarification/elaboration can help you understand what might really be going on.
• Know that you don't have to incorporate ALL the feedback, but you should have a good reason why you did or didn't use the feedback.

More great articles on feedback:
https://uxdesign.cc/how-to-give-and-receive-great-design-feedback-ca5e37eea4b9
https://www.toptal.com/designers/prototyping/taking-design-feedback-strategically


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Don’s Answer

reaching out to potential customers / clients and conducting small focus groups either virtually or in person can be very helpful in addition to having users "beta test" your designs by assessing them and following up with a set of questions or survey for insights
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