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Where can I apply for a job as a 16 year old in New York?

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Doc’s Answer

Jessica just because you didn't earn your bachelor's degree doesn't mean you can't earn big. Not all high-paying jobs require a college degree; many look for skills, experience and background knowledge in place of a university education. Our list of the Highest Paying Jobs Without A Degree features the best jobs without a degree requirement that yield the highest earning potential.

TRANSPORTATION SECURITY OFFICER – $25,500 to $38,500
Most transportation security officers work through the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's TSA, although some airports may contract with private employment agencies to fill TSO positions. Applicants for TSO positions, whether they are hired through the TSA or by private companies, must be citizens of the United States and hold a high school diploma or GED. A minimum of one year security experience is highly preferred, and candidates must pass an aptitude test, a drug and alcohol screening, and a background check. Physical exams and fitness tests are also required to ensure applicants can perform the extensive standing and lifting required for the job. Officers regularly fill out documents and incident reports by hand or on a computer, so courses in writing or typing can be beneficial to candidates in order to improve their writing skills.

HOTEL CONCIERGE – $30,000 to $55,000
A hotel concierge helps guests with requests such as transportation arrangements, restaurant reservations, and sight-seeing recommendations. Certificate programs in hospitality management introduce students to basic concepts of hotel and restaurant organization. Aspiring hotel concierges can find related coursework within certificate and degree programs in hotel and hospitality management. These programs may cover topics like event planning, guest management, resort development, and more. Though entry level employment can be found in the field, those with more advanced degrees will have a wider span of employment opportunities.

FLIGHT ATTENDANT – $33,000 to $62,000
If you love traveling, it’s hard to think of a better job than being a flight attendant (or a pilot, for that matter). Flight attendants work to ensure the safety and comfort of passengers during flights. Flight attendants may work domestically, flying on shorter flights between states, or internationally, on long-haul flights. Flight attendants often get to spend time in the places they travel to for work, and on top of their yearly salary, they often get significant discounts on airline tickets, making it easy to travel the world.

PASTRY CHEFF – $24,000 to $63,000
A pastry chef is in charge of preparing desserts and baking bread at a bakery, restaurant or other culinary establishment. Their role also encompasses developing new dessert and bread recipes, inventorying ingredients, monitoring costs and managing other pastry-making employees. Executive pastry chefs often either gain a degree in pastry-making or apprentice with a pastry maker to gain skills in their craft.

EVENT MANAGER – $38,000 to $77,000
Event managers are employed in a variety of industries. Essentially, event managers work to organize, run and promote events for businesses, organizations and individuals. This involves hiring personnel such as DJs, photographers and waiters, accurately budgeting the event, coordinating operations and being on call for any issues that might arise before or during the event. Event managers must be detail-oriented people, responsible, and — of course — know how to throw a good party!

Hope this was Helpful Jessica
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Diana’s Answer

If you have your working papers (you can get them thru your Guidance Counselor) then you can apply at any supermarket, CVS pharmacy and almost all of the retail stores hire at your age. Try looking at places around where you live or where its easy for you to commute and make a list of the places there. You can go online and find the business website and search their Career section of their website and apply to as many jobs as you can. Once you apply you can wait about 2 days and call the location you applied for and ask to speak to the manager about your application and possibly scheduling an interview.

Before your interview, research the company by reading the About Us section of their website and looking at the company Mission. That will give you a base knowledge and will help you answer some of the interview questions. Repeat this process until you land your job. Before you get a job, Google NYS Hourly Employee Rights so that you are aware of your rights as an employee.

Remember to apply where you want to work. Go to the place and see how the employees look and if the store vibes with you. Many cool places like Trader Joes and Starbucks also hire at your age and depending on the shift it can be a great job because of how the company treat its employees and the employee perks.
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Colton’s Answer

The best way to find a job when you're 16 is to talk with adults! Talk to your parents, aunts, uncles, grandparents, friend's parents, and see if any of their employers need summer help or could think of a way you could help out.

My first job at 16 came from my aunt working at an assessor's office, my second job at 17 came from my friend who worked at a music academy, my third job at 17/18 came from my dad who was playing music on the patio at a restaurant. For each of these jobs, my resume was personally passed along to the people in charge and that's the best way to get a job at 16 or at 46 years old!
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Cindy’s Answer

Start with looking into something that you're either interested in as a long term career and/or something that will start the process of giving you some basic skills that you'll be able to put into a resume. It should also be something that you can fit into your school schedule (summers/weekends/after school) and in a location that makes sense for you. For example, don't take a job 2 hours away unless you can commit to the travel time.

Your school should have resources you can use to find something, you can search the internet for businesses close to school/home, use job search engines and of course, ask around. I think its important to keep in mind that at 16 you can pick up a skill with any type of job if you're open to the learning experience. The kind of job you take at this stage of your life doesn't have to be a career path. The people skills I learned working at a bowling alley in Chelsea Piers proved themselves to be just as valuable as learning the basics during office jobs in the medical field.
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