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What's a good medical/health career for someone who's a tad squeamish?

I want to go into a medical career. I'm not great around blood, but I don't mind needles. #doctor #medicine #health #physician #psychiatry

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Jessica’s Answer

If you want to be a doctor, then I think you'll find that we see a lot fewer "gross" things than you might think. If you're a psychiatrist, the "grossest" thing you might see is someone with formication (the sensation of bugs crawling on their skin), who might have scratched their skin enough to cause an open wound. In dermatology, you might see some really gnarly rashes. Internal medicine and primary care doctors (that's what I am) don't usually see gross stuff in their day-to-day. Specialists like neurologists, rheumatologists, optometrists, cardiologists, and nephrologists usually don't do anything even remotely "gross", just a lot of reading and talking.

I would stay away from being a pathologist, who has to cut up dead human tissue, or a surgeon (any type), who has to cut up live human tissue. Obstetricians, who deliver babies, get lots of fluids (pee, poop, blood, and amniotic fluid on them). Some people don't like feet, and so they shouldn't be podiatrists, and gynecologists and proctologists have to deal with genitalia, which is not for squeamish people.

If you don't want to be a doctor, then you could be anything on the administrative side, like a receptionist, coder, or biller, and if you don't mind needles, then you could be a lab technician, although you would have to deal with other bodily fluids.

Keep in mind that a lot of people start off medical school being squeamish, and a lot of people even faint the first time they do something, but most people get used to it with time and exposure, and you might find that you're less squeamish than you think.
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Julayne’s Answer

Hello!


Have you considered a career in medical insurance coding? Usually an Associates degree and passing a certification test is what it takes.


Good luck!

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