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what are some possible careers where i can investigate racism and racial awareness?

I feel very passionately about racism and I would love to educate other about this topic, what are some possible career opportunities related to this? #career #racism #educate

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Subject: Career question for you

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Molly’s Answer

Social studies educator, I have developed several social justice projects and curricula within my district.
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Bryce’s Answer

Hi Madelyn,

There are multiple majors you could get involved with to become an educator or informer of social justice. The first major I would recommend is political science.This degree would set you up to get involved with the politics surrounding social injustice and you could become an advocate for the oppressed. The next major you could do is history. This would allow you to get involved with the his topical part of social in justice and you could get jobs at museums. The last major I can think of is a social science educator. this would allow you to teach the next generation to be better.
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Stephanie’s Answer

If you are passionate about diversity and inclusion, there are all types of jobs that may interest you. You can study Human Resources, so you are involved in the hiring decisions or regulation of policies against discrimination. I recommend researching different fields in the public sector (government). Review different federal and state agencies, such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Department of Labor, or Department of Human Services. There are several nonprofit organizations that may fit into your interests, as well. You can become an educator so you are able to teach the topic, firsthand.

Best of luck!
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Dahyun’s Answer

I think that job is not related to major in university but journalism , international politics and history. Because lots of knowledge will be helpful. Also set up about what kind of racism you want to help , there are some section about racism as LGBTQ, Asians and so on.

And read books more and more. I read like Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult and The Hate U Give. Those books was helpful when I set the what is the racism. recommend this one.
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Waleed’s Answer

Hello Madelyn!

Organizational leaders, HR professionals and D&I advocates are encouraged to work together to create an inclusive environment where people feel safe to speak up and share their concerns.

Research by the NeuroLeadership Institute (NLI) in New York found that when team members feel safe discussing racism openly and exploring whether unconscious racial biases are negatively impacting their decisions, the conversations are likely to have a more lasting and sustainable impact.

"People often are scared to say anything because they worry that if they say anything wrong, they might get fired," said Angela Nino, an HR consultant and founder of Empathic Workplace in Chicago. "It is important to create a space where people feel safe to have honest conversations where nobody feels singled out or different."

Nino said that she has counseled white people who shrug off the whole idea of microaggressions because they haven't felt them directly.

Research from New York's Center for Talent Innovation showed that 38 percent of black professionals felt it was unacceptable to speak out at their companies about their experiences of bias. Their silence made them more vulnerable to feeling isolated and alienated and fostered greater turnover and disengagement, the research reported.

Leaders who responded to racist incidents were viewed more positively by black, white, Hispanic and Asian professionals. And the ensuing discussions between team leaders and team members led to stronger bonds and greater understanding, according to the research.
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