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What is the best part about working with physically disabled patients that need help with therapy?

I am a sophomore in high school and I have always been interested in physical therapy and helping people with their disabilities. #physicaltherapy

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Sheila’s Answer

Hello Makenna:

Thank you for your question. You've received some very good comments so far. I'd like to answer your question and provide insights from a "patient's perspective" on how I feel about my therapists. I'm currently seeing physical therapists due to surgery I had a few months ago. What I like about my therapists are:

• Very nice and friendly. They are extremely personable and knows each patient by first name (including the front office staff)
• Talk through my exercise plan by educating me on what they are doing and why it is important to support the affected area
• Push me to the max. They challenge me to move (workout) past my pain. I'm the biggest chicken for pain and have -000 tolerance for it
• I feel so much better once I've completed a session
• Genuinely concerned about my recovery and health
• Very patient when I ask questions, request exercises to send to the app to do at home, and will print out exercises
• Accommodate schedules when possible

These are just a few gems that I like about my Physical Therapists. I wish you much success on your journey and I hope my testimonial was inspiring to you. Best of luck on your path! 😉

~ Sheila
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Sendil’s Answer

Physical therapists work with patients to treat and improve body movements and reduce physical pain, often through physical exercises and stretching. Physical therapists can work with a variety of patients, such as those recovering from an accident, receiving medical treatment for a chronic disease, or living with a permanent disability. Physical therapists also observe patients to help create a treatment plan and assess the effectiveness of existing treatments. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates the demand for physical therapists to grow by 28% from 2018 to 2028. Physical therapists earned a median salary of $87,930 in 2018.
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Justin’s Answer

Hello Makenna,

I see you received an answer that describes the very basics of what a PT does, but I hope this more directly answers your question. For myself, the best part of working with patients who have a physical disability is seeing them make progress and become more independent in their normal everyday lives. "Physically disabled patients" is a very broad term, which can be used to describe almost any patient a PT treats, as our job is to assess and treat physical impairments. These impairments can range from someone, who is otherwise healthy, but suffers low back pain due to sitting all day at a desk to a child born with cerebral palsy who requires treatment and adaptive equipment just to be able to sit upright and interact with their environment. I urge you to reach out to several PTs in your area and see if you can shadow them for a couple hours, but this is now easer said than done do to the COVID-19 restrictions. If that is not possible, then research the different settings that PTs work in, such as an acute care hospital, outpatient clinic and/or long-term care, just to name a few. This way you get a good idea of what exactly PTs do, which does vary widely based on the environment she or he works in. The best thing about being a PT, at least for myself, is that there are multiple different aspects of therapy that are available to work in, but the ultimate end result is that you are helping others. I hope that answers your question. Take care!
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Emma’s Answer

Hello Makenna,

Being a therapist for physically disabled patients is an incredibly rewarding career, packed with profound experiences. The most gratifying aspect of this job is the positive difference you can make in your patients' lives. You get to see firsthand their journey towards reclaiming their mobility and independence, which is truly heartwarming. Forming strong bonds with patients and their families enriches the job, making it not just professionally satisfying, but personally fulfilling as well.

Moreover, the appreciation and sense of purpose radiated by patients and their families underscore the importance of this profession. As a rehabilitation therapist, you have the chance to continuously develop your abilities and embrace innovative techniques, all while working in various healthcare environments. In a nutshell, the joy of helping people conquer physical obstacles, enhance their lifestyle, and regain their self-reliance makes being a therapist for physically disabled patients a career choice that is both deeply significant and satisfying.
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