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How can I pinpoint transferrable skills from an old job to a new job in a new industry domain?

Office Hours #1: Resume Writing with Judy Park [34:47]

This question was posed by a question during one of our most recent "CareerVillage Office Hours" sessions. During Office Hours sessions, we invite students to pose questions related to a specific topic. In this case, the topic was resume writing. If you answer this question, we will reach out to the students who attended this office hours session to inform them of your response, and all students on CareerVillage will benefit. If you would be interested in hosting an office hours session on a particular topic, please reach out to our staff!

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Judy Park's answer: Studying the job description will really help! Even if it's not something you've done recently, there are things the employer is looking for that you might've done before in some other capacity, even if it's not the most recent experience. List it all out! I like to look at everything in a resume to see what skills and experience you have that answers the job description. CV Office Hours .
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Simeon’s Answer

Look at the job description and look it over for key words, especially verbs and industry related buzz words. Look for ways in which your previous experience demonstrated your capacity to do those jobs. Any interpersonal skills you can highlight will also be good to point out as it'll show your ability to follow instructions and get along well with others.
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Stephen’s Answer

That is a great question! For many jobs, they tend to look at both hard skills and soft skills (such as being able to receive feedback, completing projects within deadlines, etc). With that, I would first see what soft skills would be required in this new role. Then, take a look at your previous role and see in which responsibilities you demonstrated these soft skills.

For instance, a friend of mine transitioned from doing lab work to becoming a social media writer. In both lab work and social media writing, he had to balance project management and research skills. On his resume and interview, he discussed how he demonstrated project management and research skills and would translate that into the role he was applying for.
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Tamisha’s Answer

I find it is easier to make a list of the qualifications, skills, and tasks you are currently doing or have done in previous positions, and then when you find a job description that interests you, look at the requirements to see where there a similar tasks or functions. During the interview, you can draw connections from your previous experience and apply it to what they are asking for in the job description you are applying for.
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Lauren’s Answer

I recently transitioned from a career in finance to human resources. It is important to read job descriptions of the roles you are looking to transition to and see if any of the skills required for that job relate to experiences you have had. When you find some similarities make sure to call those experiences out on your resume and cover letter. When it comes time for an interview, make sure to share those experiences you have had with skills that relate to the job your are interviewing for! Best of luck!
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Alice’s Answer

+1 to Judy's answer to look at the job description. I try to tailor each resume depending on a company's job description because each company may use slightly different verbiage to list what skills and experience they are seeking in the job description. Certain jobs posts may receive hundreds of job applicants and some companies may use AI tools to filter out which resumes match and which do not.

For "soft skills," such as being organized or collaborating with various groups, you can also convey that in a cover letter. Most employers generally flag the cover letter as optional as part of a job application but the cover letter is a great place to elaborate on the soft skills an employer is looking for - you can provide more concrete examples of those soft skills in the cover letter and be should to touch upon those points if you get to the interview stage.
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Jill’s Answer

I recently did this while transitioning from being a psychologist to a data analyst. I found that talking with people in the industry I was moving into helped me identify similarities. I also read a lot of job descriptions (even for jobs I wasn't going to apply to) and looked for similarities across those. It can take a bit of creativity and sometimes other points of view to really get a solid idea of transferable skills.

Good luck!
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Dean’s Answer

In addition to what Stephen said above you can also list "Core Competencies" at the top of your resume with general bullets like cross functional team leadership, project management, etc. Just be prepared to give examples to a prospective employer if those specific examples are not listed on your resume. Sign up for this free course which can give you some great keywords for both resumes and cover letters....https://caffeinatedkyle.com/courses/

I've found the site very helpful in drafting my resume when I was applying to jobs outside of the industry I was used to working in.
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