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what education is needed to be a nurse?

not really sure if this is my exact career choice but at the moment im thinking it would be nice to be a nurse. #nurse

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Doc’s Answer

Shayna the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects faster-than-average growth rates for registered nurses and advanced practice nurses: 15% and 31%, respectively. Graduates of accredited nursing programs enjoy a robust job market with plenty of opportunities for professional growth. A nursing degree provides healthcare professionals with diverse job opportunities and high potential salaries. The first step is to decide what kind of nurse you want to be. This is important for determining what kind of education and other requirements you should pursue. Once you know what kind of nursing career you want, you can begin earning the appropriate education for the position. Make sure your school is accredited before you begin your program.

CNA CERTIFICATE • 4-12 week Certificate
Candidates for a CNA certificate need a high school diploma or GED. The program prepares students to perform direct patient care and provides training in areas like first aid, infection control, and general safety. The average salary for someone with a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) in the United States is between $35,500 as of October 30, 2020.

LPN / LVN CERTIFICATE • 1 year Certificate
A one-year program, an LPN/LVN certificate serves students who wish to enter the nursing profession without committing to a bachelor's program. Graduates learn how to provide patient care tasks, such as measuring vital signs, administering medications, and tracking medical histories. The average LPN/LVN salary in the United States is $51,000 as of October 30, 2020.

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING (ADN) • 2-YEAR DEGREE
A two-year associate degree in nursing prepares graduates to take the NCLEX-RN to become a registered nurse. ADN programs serve students who plan to earn a bachelor's or master's degree later in their career but wish to start working in the nursing field right away. ADN programs usually require students to complete college-level introductory coursework in microbiology, chemistry, psychology, and medical terminology. ADN credits often transfer to four-year BSN programs. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the average annual salary for ADN-RNs is $77,000 as of October 30, 2020.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (BSN) • 4-YEAR DEGREE
A four-year program that positions graduates for supervisory nursing posts and provides a foundation for graduate study. Successful completion of a four-year undergraduate degree program in nursing prepares graduates to sit for the NCLEX-RN examination and become licensed registered nurses (RNs). A bachelor's degree will prepare students to become registered nurses through study of chemistry, nutrition, pharmacology, and nursing management. Current hiring trends in nursing favor RNs with a BSN degree. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the average annual salary for BSN-RNs is $86,500 as of October 30, 2020.

Hope this was Helpful Shayna
Thank you comment icon Thank You Dexter for your continued support. We are a success when we've made friends with our past, are focused on the present, and are optimistic about our future. Doc Frick
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Kerrie’s Answer

To become a nurse and figure out what educational requirements are needed, you should look into the type of nurse you may wan to become. For example, nurses work in a myriad of areas, not just in the hospitals. Nurses can work in public schools, in law offices, in the operating room, in doctor's offices, in research, in health and wellness, with pharmaceutical companies, with product companies, and even more! Nurses can also start out as Certified Nurses Aides (CNAs) and then advance their degree and licensure to become Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), Bachelor of Science Nurses (BSNs), Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) or Doctorate in Education Nurses (EdD), and Advance Practice Nurses (APRN's), depending on your desire.
I would suggest finding the local hospitals or nursing homes in your area, seeing what their requirements are for becoming a volunteer, and then trying it out. What is awesome is that a lot of local hospitals love to have high school students volunteer after school and it gives you an opportunity to see if you like it. If you do, you could enroll in a local CNA program, that may be six weeks or longer depending on the program, where you can then work in a hospital or nursing home after you gain your certification. This would be the first stepping stone to a nursing program so you would already have your feet wet and it is a great way to get into the "hospital setting" to see what it is like.
In the end, I always suggest trying out what you may find interesting to see if you like it first before going full speed into a career. I knew since I was little that I was going to be a nurse and 25 years later, I still am! I have been able to work in a lot of different settings and locations, but when it comes down to it, it is my passion and love for what I do that makes the difference! I always say that you should do what you love!

Kerrie recommends the following next steps:

Find local hospitals or nursing homes in your area to see what their requirements are for becoming a volunteer, and apply.
If you like being a volunteer, find local CNA programs and apply one that fits your needs.
After you finish CNA course, apply to work at local hospital or nursing home or clinic.
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Tequila’s Answer

Hi Shayna,
Becoming a nurse starts with physical and behavioral science classes. Start with biology in high school and see if your HS offers advanced biology courses.
In college, you will need to take anatomy & physiology, microbiology, chemistry, psychology, sociology. If available a course in genetics is helpful but not mandatory. After taking these basic courses then each school has their own requirements.
I found that when I taught at nursing schools, student did better when they had a strong arithmetic background. Having the ability to retain large volumes of information helps too.
Although, not a college subject, being able to have deal with people and being empathetic helps.
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