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I enjoy learning about Greek gods. What job is right for me?

Well hello! I'm Ms. Spatzer at the International Community School. My 4th graders have a few questions and I'd like to share your advice with them. Thanks so much!

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Gloria’s Answer

Hi,
I have a friend who studied Greek and Roman mythology as a part of Classics degree. She wanted to go on to earn a PhD so she could teach the subject to other people. During her college experience, she worked with archeologists, people who studied ancient civilizations through the studying objects and places where people used to live. For you, that would be studying places where people worshipped the Greek gods. She also worked with people who wrote books about how the Greek gods shaped the world or other topics related to studying the civilizations of Greece and Rome in ancient times. The Greek gods are interesting as individuals as well. They each have a role and maybe you find that you like one over the other. Maybe Poseidon inspires you to learn more about the oceans, so you can be a marine biologist or a sailor. Maybe Demeter inspires you to learn more about nature. from being a farmer to a gardener to a weather person.
Gloria
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Andy’s Answer

I'd say that any and all jobs are good for you. Whatever you do professionally doesn't have to keep you from your own passions or succeeding at them. You can go into history or Classics or more traditional fields, or you could be a welder, a farrier, or a statistician fascinated by Greek mythology and still study it. A good approach is to consider why the Greek gods fascinate you. Is it the stories? The interactions? The notion of higher beings? That will drive how you find what you want in a field. And when you know what you want, you can go after it. Choosing what you do professionally need not limit you. If you become a teacher, a professor, a mason, you can always still study Greek mythology independently, take local classes, write articles, essays, and poems on your own and have those worth something. Chekhov was a doctor, Kafka worked for the equivalent of a Workers' Compensation Board, and Wallace Stevens sold insurance. Yet we them as writers and poets, as well as their professions.
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Mary Ann’s Answer

I agree with Andy's response. I majored in Classical Languages (Ancient Greek and Latin) in college. I studied Greek and Roman history and mythology. I read many stories, like The Iliad, in Greek. Some of my classmates went on to study more about the topic and become professors. I did not want to do that. I loved to read, so my first jobs were as book and magazine editors. My knowledge of Greek and Latin helped my vocabulary and grammar. My career path took a turn when I worked for a corporate training company as an editor. I discovered that I liked to build workshops for people -- to help them be happier and more effective in their jobs. My advice is to stay curious. You will find that there are other topics that will fascinate you.
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Jennifer’s Answer

If you are interested in Greek Gods, there are a variety of majors you can have in college. For instance, you may want to study classical literature and that would give you the opportunity to do a deep-dive into the various myths and plays written about the Greek Gods. Another option is to study ancient history or ancient civilizations where you could learn about what was happening in the world during certain time periods. Another exciting option is to study art history where you can learn about how the Greek Gods were depicted in art through the years, including ancient art!
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