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What jobs can I get with a bachelors in health science ?


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Meighan’s Answer

With a Bachelor's of Science in Health Science, you can likely get jobs in medical research (depending on your lab experience within you major and your extracurricular actives), pharmaceutical or medical sales, biotech companies, or entry level healthcare administration positions. Specific jobs will depend on your extracurricular and work experience you gain during college, as these combined with your coursework and academic performance, will lay the foundation for your resume.

Many students also use a Bachelors in Health Science as a springboard and pursue entry into Medical School, Pharmacy School, Dental School, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, and Occupational Therapy.

With any degree, it's best to start planning for entry into the job market while still in college. Visit your college's career center and discuss your goals. If, for example, you want to pursue research positions upon graduation, you perhaps could start interning at the hospital affiliated with your school or for one of your professor's research projects. For any job, you want to have some relevant work experience (either part time, during summer breaks, volunteer experience, or an internship) so you can start building the skills that those positions require.

Another good resource is your Academic Advisor. Many schools have advising departments by major, so you can look up who your advisor is and make an appointment online. If you are pursing further schooling after you undergraduate degree, they can make sure your major and elective courses meet prerequisite requirements for entry into your chosen graduate school program.


Thank you for replying to my question! That is my issue now, I didn’t do any extracurricular activities or internships. I have my bachelors now but no luck finding job due to lack of experience. I’m spending time trying to decide if I should go back and get my masters. Alexis L.

(1 of 4) This is a tough job market-keep you head up! I would hesitate to go to grad school simply for job opportunities due to large financial investment grad school represents. Many grad school graduates still struggle in the job market. Without traditional work experience, it's time to get more creative with the jobs you are pursuing. Can you expand your job search to a larger geographic area or to industries you may not have considered before that are tangential to your ultimate goals? For example, if you eventually want to go into medical sales, maybe consider other sales positions to build sales experience. If you want to eventually go into healthcare administration, maybe consider front desk work in a doctors office or other clinic. Meighan Middleton

(2 of 4) You can also expand your experience by your volunteer interests while working a job not in your desired industry. For example, if you are driving for Uber now, perhaps you can volunteer with a medical research or fundraising organization that interests you such as the Susan G. Komen Foundation to expand your work experience in related fields. I also recommend following websites such as Career Contessa which have job newsletters you can sign up for and lots of career advice for those looking for work. Fairy GodBoss is another website with good resources (I found this article that might be helpful: https://fairygodboss.com/articles/6-ways-successful-women-bounce-back-after-endless-job-rejections). Meighan Middleton

(3 of 4) If you absolutely feel like you must expand your education before returning the job search, consider professional certifications first before another degree plan. These could be Project Management or perhaps some digital skills such as Photoshop. If you are unsure what to pursue, skim the qualifications list of jobs you want to apply for or were rejected from and look for areas your experience is lacking and then focus on developing those. Meighan Middleton

(4 of 4) Lastly, there are ton of free resources on updating your Linked In Profile and resume (try YouTube, Career Contessa, Ladies Get Paid). Use these and make sure your resume and LinkedIn are good reflections of who you are and your capabilities. Good luck! Meighan Middleton

Thank you for the wonderful advice !! I will certainly take everything you told me and do something with it. I think it’s best I gain experience. Once again, you have been more helpful than my advisor. Alexis L.

Thank you for your kind words! Best of luck to you and feel free to look me up on Linked In (profile linked in my bio). Meighan Middleton

Also, one other thought came to mind. Have you considered working as a Contact Tracer? Still an extremely necessary job for most state and local governments and Departments of Health AND gets you into an entry position in the medical field. Meighan Middleton

I have not even heard of that !! Thank you for the information , I’m going to look into that. You are so helpful ! I hope you see this @meighanmiddleton , not sure how to answer directly to you Alexis L.

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Nicole’s Answer

Hi Alexis,

Meighan has some great suggestions, and I'll add on to her response, specifically to consider the information that you added in your comment. A couple of short-term options would be to look at temporary staffing agencies to find a role as a contractor, if you're having a hard time getting hired into a permanent position. Another idea is to look for 'internships' that will accept students after graduation.

Your college's career development office may be another resource for you on this.

Personally, I wouldn't recommend going back for a masters without getting some real-life work experience, unless you make a concrete plan for how you will get work experience as part of your masters program. Otherwise, you will have even more education and potentially still no work experience to use towards employment (and maybe even more student loan debt). Plus, after working for a little while, you may find that you are passionate about something different and decide to pursue your masters in a different field.

Are you on LinkedIn? I'd recommend signing up and using your network to help introduce you to people within your field or at companies where you'd like to work. Having a personal connection goes a long way in helping to find a job. Don't get discouraged - the job market is tough right now, and you're doing the right thing!

All the best,
Nicole

Thank you for the advice !!! It makes sense I should job shadow or intern at different places to see what I would like to do. I didn’t look at it that way. I find it confusing using linkedIn. I had it for awhile but wasn’t sure how to connect to people. Alexis L.

Hi Alexis! I would give LinkedIn another try, if you’re willing. You are welcome to practice using it by connecting to me, if you’d like. (No obligation!) Or, is there someone you know who might be able to help you learn how to use it? You should be able to search for people’s names and then add them as a connection. It will help you stay in touch and figure out if anyone you know works at a place where you’d like to get a job (like maybe an advisor, a friend’s parent, etc). Let me know any follow up questions! Nicole Pinckney

Yes ! I just downloaded again and am willing to give it a try. My name on there is Valeria Lozoya. Thank you Nicole ! Alexis L.

Absolutely! LinkedIn also has a jobs page where you can set alerts so that you get emails when there are new job postings that meet your criteria. Best of luck! Nicole Pinckney

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Magdalin’s Answer

A Bachelor's degree in Health science provides essential healthcare knowledge and skills while building professional skills sought by healthcare employers, such as critical thinking, problem solving, leadership, information literacy, and information management.

And if you complete this program you might be a

Cardiovascular technician
Anesthesia technician
Dental hygienist
Occupational therapy assistant
Physical therapy assistant
Respiratory therapist
Surgical technician
Registered health information technician
Biomedical equipment technician
Medical lab technician
Cancer registrar
EKG technologist
Audiology technician
Pharmacy technician
Paramedic
Veterinary technician
Radiation therapist
Medical assistant

All the Best!

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