Skip to main content
4 answers
5
Asked 327 views

Are there any disadvantages for being a medical doctor?

If there is any, what are they? #doctors

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

5

4 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

John’s Answer

Jaden if you’re pursuing a career of becoming a doctor, then you’ve obviously been super successful with your academics up to this point. However, whether being a doctor is worth it or not is ultimately a personal opinion, if you're contemplating this career path you'll need to consider how YOU would answer the question 'why do you want to be a doctor'. The personal answers to this question may help you decide whether your medical career goals and interests are worth your time, money, and effort it takes to become a doctor. For many physicians, the ability to positively impact patients’ lives each day is easily the biggest benefit – you'll wake up every day knowing you're making a difference; but disadvantages may include time, cost and long hours.

• EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS – Most doctors complete a 4-year bachelor's degree program, followed by a 4-year medical school program. After medical school, doctors must complete a residency program in their particular specialty area, which may vary from 3 -7 years. That means it can take up to 15-years before you can start to practice as a doctor. If you love to learn, medicine is one of the best fields you can pursue. Medical school is just the beginning of your education. Physicians who’ve been practicing for decades regularly encounter unique situations, new treatments, and evolving technologies .

• EDUCATIONAL COSTS – Doctors often cite high tuition costs associated with medical school (assuming a 4-year stint) can range from $180,000 to $260,000. Of course these numbers do not include annual increases in tuition rates, nor do they factor in the cost of living while you are attending medical school. Doctors go through an extensive amount of training before they’re able to practice. All that experience means physicians are among the most generously compensated members of the workforce.

• TIME SACRIFICES – Long hours come with the territory. Physicians may have to work nights, weekends, and holidays. You might miss a few weddings and other social events. You also need to make yourself available at a moment’s notice if you happen to be on call. Even regular workdays can be unpredictable, you'lll find yourself serving on-call responsibilities, treating people after-hours because of emergencies, and responding to calls at all hours even if your job duties cause you to maintain regular working hours.

• SALARY BENEFITS – It’s well-documented how much money doctors make in their practice. Although the salary that you can earn as a doctor depends on your experience, your specialty you practice, the setting where you work, and your geographic location. The cost of medical school isn’t cheap, and you may be repaying that for a while. Although, as a resident physicians you'll be paid a salary. You'll be providing valuable work for the hospitals and clinics as you're taking care of patients and providing coverage day and night, weekends and holidays. This salary is about $90,000 per year. 

Hope this is helpful Jaden

John recommends the following next steps:

Applying to medical school is obviously an important part of the journey. Be sure to work closely with your school(s) academic advisors.
Even though students get into medical school and have prepared their whole lives to become a doctor, they don’t think about what kind of doctor they want to be. In fact, many students don’t figure that out until the last few semesters of medical school and there’s nothing wrong with that. Take your time figuring out what you want to do.
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Poli’s Answer

Like any other job, medical field has advantages as well as disadvantages. Depending on the specialization, all healthcare providers are required to update their licenses every two years. For grad med students, two years of residency is required unless you are interested in a specific specialization where additional 2-4 years are needed post graduation. First 10 years, do not plan to earn big money, because most of it will go straight to your loans, unless you can manage it wisely. At the beginning, unstable/night shifts, small amount of payed days off, additional computer work at home besides the working hours, extra expenses for insurances, although depends on a company, they might provide it for you.
Again depending on the field, there are some more positive and negative aspects of a job, if you are ready to dedicate all your life for this career with no doubts then go for it!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Betty’s Answer

Hi Jaden,

I'm not very familiar with the medical field, but I've heard over the years there are several factors that make being a medical doctor really difficult. The first is the huge student debt from loans that would need to be paid off after graduation, and because being a doctor requires 7 years of medical school, debt is comparatively higher for this profession than others. The second is the high cost of malpractice insurance if you have a private practice. Also, depending on the field of medicine you choose, you might have really tough hours like being on call or tending patients 12 hours straight, which is not uncommon in this field. The last thing is the fact that HMOs can sometimes dictate the preferred or prescribed treatment based on costs. I've heard that C sections have become more common, more often based on risk factor, but also based on the fact that it may be a cheaper procedure than normal birthing. Doctors might not have as much control as they would like over what the HMOs dictate as standard care.

While there are many pitfalls, I think the most rewarding thing about being a doctor is the fact that this is a highly regarded profession, you're doing good for the community, salaries are quite high for this profession and you can continue to advance the field of medicine to help those in need. Pursue your passion and interests, and the rest will fall into place. Good luck.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

David’s Answer

Jaden, that is a great question. One should look at the good and bad of any career choice.
I have had a great career as an infectious disease physician. I would do it again without hesitation.
Downside: long hours, stress, time away from other opportunities, responsibility for well being of others. All of these may be lessened by picking fields of medicine or specific groups within a specialty.
I am certain the benefits of a career in medicine outweigh the potential downside.
0