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how can i learn programming with master in biotech

i have completed bachleor in biotech and want to pursue master in biotech but with computer duality degree programming computer-programming computer computer-science computer-programming

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Scott’s Answer

In addition to the other great answers here regarding programming, always keep in mind that programming languages exist for a couple of main reasons. First, obviously, to allow writing computer instructions to solve various kinds of problems. Some languages are better suited for particular problem domains. Second, is to allow comprehension of the algorithms involved in a program, by humans. I consider this the primary job of higher level languages, otherwise we would still be using assembly language.

The common thread running through all programming languages is the benefit of writing well organized instructions which can be easily understood with a minimum of comments in the code. If you are using an Object Oriented language this involves object modeling which is the creation of object classes that accurately describe the "physical" entity they are modeling. For a functional language, it involves creating concise functions that ideally do one thing without depending on "external" resources. These types of functions can be easily used in a variety of situations and are generally more flexible. In any programming language, using clear, accurate names for variables and functions is also critical to convey the intent of the code to others who will need to understand or modify the code in the future, including yourself.

Getting back to how to learn programming, I would start with an actual project of something interesting to you. Ideally something related to biotech to leverage your experience with your major. Genetics analysis is full of opportunities for applying computers for processing the immense data involved. Select a project and start outlining the steps involved to solve the problem. You can start at a high level and then "decompose" the steps into smaller units until you get to something that can be coded.

Good luck and have fun!
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Kanu’s Answer

Learning Programming doesn't specifically require a college course or a degree. In my personal experience, I once interviewed a guy who was an electrical engineering undergraduate and was marvelous in coding!
You can begin with following steps

Kanu recommends the following next steps:

Learn about the type of languages - Procedural & Object Oriented
Identify which one you want to focus first, I would suggest OOPS as its more widely used
Identify which language of the above type you would like to learn
Start coding! Use resources like hackerrank, stack overflow!
Once you learn one language others will be fairly easy to learn! It's all about building a strong base
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Larry’s Answer

Python is a high level object-oriented programming language, ideal for biotech data analysis. It also have so many interests community and libraries online where you can quickly find help or solutions.

Open courseware and some learning App is a good starting point. If you are missing some fundamental pieces in computer science, I would suggest you also take courses in data structure, algorithm, operating system before diving into programming practices.
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David’s Answer

Programming definitely can be self-taught. I would say that even with college experience, one doesn't always get to learn software engineering practices, and that they can vary from company to company what is required and development processes.

Definitely check out free online course as Pavan has mentioned, and perhaps get involved with some open source projects.

Some software/language communities have neat exercises you can leverage to learn to both read and write code like Rustlings.

https://github.com/rust-lang/rustlings

Also, don't be too concerned if your area of study isn't related to computing directly too much. I don't think this should be a barrier to anyone learning how to write and read software.

Good luck to you! I hope you find it as fun as I do!
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Indira’s Answer

Bioinformatics is the way to learn programming in biology/ biotech field. Many courses are available at coursera, learn to upgrade, udemy, unacademy, etc
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PAVAN’s Answer

Hi Raj, if you are interested in learning programming, there are tons of online content available - starting from coursera, udemy, udacity, edx, MIT open courseware and most of these are free. But if you want to pursue a dual Master's degree, you might have to research the colleges which offer them. I myself was a mechanical engineer and learnt programming on my own.
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