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Are jobs in business administration and management in high demand in the United States?

I plan to major in Business Administration and Management, and hopefully have a career in it one day. business marketing career-development business-analysis

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Theresa’s Answer

Business Administration and Management cover may activities and responsibilities for all types of jobs so you could have many opportunities when you graduate. It will be important to figure out what you like best, what you're really good at and what topics or industries you find interesting. Then learn more about those topics - they could mean specializing in a particular area, like Human Resources, Plant Operations, Field Technician Management or looking for a position with a company that you admire in a specific industry. As you get ideas about what you might like, do some job searches on the internet to learn what jobs are called and what responsibilities and experience companies look for in candidates for those jobs. Then look for opportunities to get your own experience. This could mean joining a club, managing a budget for a friend, relative or team. It could include coordinating schedules and tracking participation or helping with the distribution of the uniforms for a local little league. The opportunities are only limited by your imagination! Be as bold and creative as you dare.

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Frank’s Answer

Lots of good advice already. I chose to respond to this question, asked a few years ago, as I am myself testimony for having a Business Administration degree and working in the US as a foreigner for many years. Not only is it possible, but a BA degree is a solid basis for all kinds of jobs that are and will be in demand in the United States and elsewhere.
Having said that, it's also key to understand that a degree is always only an entry ticket or a hygiene factor for qualifying for a role in business. Bringing a little bit of experience from internships in an area relevant for the job will help. But what recruiting managers in businesses typically look for the most is what kind of skills and fundamental competencies you bring that will help you evolve and contribute to the business in question such as for example: genuine curiosity and a willingness/ability to learn, ability to work well with other people/collaborate in a team, communicate well with the right mix of confidence and humility etc
So, from my point of view, what's most important early on in a business career, is, yes, the degree such as e.g. BA as an entry ticket, but really a set of competencies that look promising to a hiring organization of what you can develop into once you gain more experience there (as opposed to needing a ton of experience in order to get hired).
Now, to be hired by an organization as a foreigner in the US - or other labor markets that would require you to receive a specific work permit/visa - the chances will be best once you do have some specific experience or even expertise in an area that is scarce and highly sought after. For example, it was feasible for me to go that route in the mid 1990s and get a job in the US because, at the time, I had experience with SAP which was in demand, but where there was not much supply for in the US.
So when you plan to work abroad in a region that requires you to have a specific work permit, you need to look at it through the lense of an organization in that region: what do YOU bring which someone in that market who would not need a work permit might not have at the same level. And that specific experience or skill may then be something you want to purposefully plan to build up in order to get you there...
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Rebecca Beyer’s Answer

Yes. Since business is such a broad area, it's important to look at the various areas within business. Accounting is something that every company needs. Consulting and banking are great opportunities as is marketing and sales. While it is important to consider job availability, this shouldn't be the only criteria for selecting a job. Many high school and most college career offices offer self-assessment test to help you determine which jobs would be a good fit for you. I encourage you to take advantage of those resources to help you narrow your focus.

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Kim’s Answer

Your have been given some excellent advice already. If you have decided to pursue business you may want to consider a minor in finance or at least take some additional finance courses. Even if you do not pursue finance directly, it will give some great insight into how the business success is measured and what drivers make an impact. It will also put you in a nice position for management opportunities.

Kim recommends the following next steps:

Evaluate if additional finance courses are part of your curriculum.
Look for intern opportunities to learn more about how your degree can be put into practice.
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