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How do I separate my career goal from my life

I want to find a dream job right for me #job #career-choice #career-counseling

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Subject: Career question for you

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Maggie’s Answer

I feel like there are 2 ways to approach life: 1) Make enough money to support your passions/hobbies 2) make your work your passion/hobby (where your life becomes your work) - sometimes if you do this you could potentially risk burning out in your hobby/passion.

In terms of scheduling/time - I like to block time off in my calendar for personal things (go to the gym, dinner with family, concerts) by writing/blocking time off for personal time ensures that you can turn off your "work mind" and fully embrace your time off.
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James’s Answer

There are questions/answers on this site about separating work and life and there are questions/answers about aligning work and life. The reality is, it is always a balance. Finding the balance that you are comfortable with is key - and recognize that that balance, and that comfort, will change over time.

What is fundamental is for you to understand what your personal goals are. What is it you want to accomplish. This will drive what you need to do on the "work" side and whether it's worth the price you pay. And then make a plan to continually re-evaluate as your life changes, your needs change and your circumstances change.

There can be a cost to separating but more and more companies are coming to terms with the fact that being on 24x7 is not sustainable.
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Jay’s Answer

Aniya,

While it is not always possible, I do try and encourage people to try and find a career that actually aligns with their interests and goals. If you think about it, you have to spend 1/3rd (or more) of your weekdays at your job, so the closer that job aligns with your passions and interests, the happier you will be.

So I would encourage you to look for those aspects of your personal life that engage and empower you and use those as qualities to look for in your career.

Best of luck.
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Leland’s Answer

If there is something you are truly passionate about, it is possible for career and life to become one and the same, but you will need to dedicate yourself to it fully. It may mean sacrificing every spare moment of your free time working your way towards your passion, whether it be through work, school, volunteering, or personal projects. Whatever you do, you need the mentality that everything you do starting today is something that is inching you closer to your goal.

How do you find your passion? Think about what you like to do more than anything else and what types of people you admire. Then think about what jobs are out there doing that thing. Is it realistic to think you have or can you get the skills that would make you stand out from other people who also share that passion?

Now comes the really hard part. You have to weigh what those types of jobs pay and the availability of those jobs against whatever your financial needs are. Do you see yourself being happy if you have to scrape by financially? Can you be just as happy with a job that provides more financial security that allows you to enjoy life outside of work? Few people find their dream job. And of those that do, many come to find that the sacrifices to their lives are too great to sustain that job. Or they find that work can be a means to an end to pursue their passion outside of work.

Not everyone has or finds a passion. Consider yourself lucky if you do.
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Gloria’s Answer

Hi Aniya,

This is always the balance that you are going to struggle with. The struggle is part of life. Your challenge is this. The best job for you at any given moment aligns with the skills that you have. That is the meeting point between the professional and the personal. I love to write. I write all the time even when I don't get paid to do it. But hey, why not get paid to do it? And I do. As others have said, it is about work - life balance, mostly in the time management category for me since I can fall into being a workaholic quite easily. It happens because I like what I do.

The other element of your question that struck me was the idea of separating yourself from your career goal. I almost feel like this is a bit about being perceived in a certain way because of your career goal? Maybe I am reading into that. I know that I have a very successful career, making money to have the life that I choose. And yet when I tell people what I do, they wonder what it is that I do. I am an Instructional Designer. And while it has specific meaning in my field, most people have no idea what it means. Is it good? How do you do things of value in that job? I know others suffer from the high expectations of a job. I know teachers and nurses who suffer from the expectations of a job. It is often expected in those roles that your life is your job. And that is its own challenge, one that you need to determine if you can accept when you enter the field of your choice. There are some jobs that have high expectations and separating them from you, the person, can be difficult.

Gloria
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