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What are some colleges/universities with engaging classes?

I'm interested in becoming a computer programmer and I'd like to know if there were classes that are known to not bore me to death.
#computer-programming #college

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Nicole’s Answer

Hi Aiden A. Thanks for posting this honest question.:)

I have to share with you. It is entirely possible that not every class you take will be exciting. But, they may be classes that are required for graduating with your degree. Soooo, how to make it past those "boring" classes? Try to remember why you are taking those courses to begin with. It could be that one or two "boring" classes that get you to the goal of graduating with a degree that gets you to your dream career may be worth it ;).

One way to balance our your course load, especially if you are considering computer programming, is to take some other types of classes. Languages, an art or music class, a drama class....these could be great ways to balance out those classes that are a little less exciting.

Hope you find this answer helpful. Best of luck to you!
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Angelo’s Answer

Hi Aiden!
I would recommend courses like Data Structures, Algorithms, Concurrent Programming, and Artificial Intelligence.
Yes, I know, the names of these seem a bit scary 😂 but the reason I loved these courses was because they talked about real-world problems and how programming was used to solve them. It's not like I did super well in all of these either - even though they challenged me at times, I had a lot of fun learning about these things (and you can meme with your friends about it too, like "Bruh, I was at Costco and this guy cut in front of me in the queue... invalid operation")

Requirements & Specifications is a very important course too (too many things are being made nowadays without being thoroughly planned, which leads to way more cost). It's important to know the facts about planning before you go into the field and assume a process like Waterfall/Agile is the best; you should know the pros and cons of each and why they fail in certain situations.
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Craig’s Answer

MIT is good
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Will’s Answer

If you attend a large university (large can be good - larger scope of programs and student body organizations, intramural sports, etc), you may find yourself in 200-300 person lecture halls while getting through your gen-eds and prerequisites. In my experience, after those are complete, you'll find yourself in tight-knit, hands on courses specific to your major.
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