Skip to main content
9 answers
9
Updated 825 views

What are the best AP classes are the best to take even if your are undecided in college major?

I am still young and have a lot to decide but will be in high school soon and need to figure everything out! #academic-advising

Edit: It is now October of 2022. I have moved farther up in my schooling, still not quite there but getting closer and more eager to continue my education! I do truly believe I have decided on my future career path. I believe I am going to pursue general surgery or possibly even Cardio-Thoracic surgery...Still not quite sure how to get there. Law used to be big for me but now this is an entire other ball game. In college how would I pursue my career in any type of surgery? What would that look like for me in regards to what courses and as well in what I am majoring in?-Big thank for all your guys' help!

Thank you comment icon Honestly, I would take any that interests you, or anything you think you might enjoy. On top of that, I would consider taking courses that would cover some of your general education requirements for college. Have you tried talking to you school counselor? They tend to know a lot more about the subject and have more resources to recommend to you! Vicky

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

9

9 answers


2
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Doc’s Answer

Samantha the Advanced Placement (AP) program is managed by the College Board, which is the same organization that administers the SAT exams. Because they are designed to build college-level skills, AP courses offer high school students a unique opportunity for college preparation. There are over 30 courses and exams available through the AP program in the areas of arts, English, sciences, math, computer science, foreign languages, history and social science. Most high schools require students to be juniors or seniors to take AP courses, although some institutions make exceptions for especially talented younger students. To find out how to enroll, contact the AP coordinator at your high school. Your high school AP coordinators can provide you with detailed information about each class. Be sure to discuss the course requirements and workload to ensure that you're truly prepared for this Advanced Placement Course. take an honest look at your academic strengths and weaknesses. For example, if you excel in math, then you should consider AP courses in calculus, computer science, and statistics. But if you know math isn't your strong suit, then you may not want to place that additional pressure on yourself. If you like science, you might enroll in AP chemistry or AP physics. If you shine in the arts and humanities you might prefer AP courses in art history, foreign languages, music theory, or english literature.

After completing an AP course, students have the option to take the associated AP exam. The exam is not required, but a high score – typically a 4 or a 5 on a 5-point scale – can lead to college credit. According to the College Board, 90% of colleges and universities award college credit, placement in advanced courses, or both after earning a qualifying score on the AP exam. Your not required to take the AP exam after completing an AP course, conversely you don't have to complete an AP course to take the exam, although it's highly recommended if the course is available. The advantage to this rule is that home-schooled students and those whose schools don't offer AP courses can still get college credit by taking an AP exam. Students typically take the exams in their junior and senior years of high school. There is a fee to register, and tests are administered in the spring. Scores are reported to students and colleges the following summer. You are allowed to retake an exam the following year. All scores are reported unless the you cancel the score or withhold the score from being reported to college(s) of your choice.

Hope this help Samantha
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Samantha
Thank you comment icon Thank You Dan. If our hopes of building a better and safer world are to become more than wishful thinking, we will need the engagement of volunteers more than ever. Doc Frick
2
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Dana’s Answer

I would say definitely English and Math! It's great to have a strong foundation in those subjects :)
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brianna’s Answer

Hi! You definitely have a lot of time when it comes to thinking about college. I would suggest looking at all the AP classes your school has to offer, and try for the ones that are interesting to you! Some stable ones would probably be related to literature and mathematics, but it's most important to see what you want to focus on! Even if its a class that does not relate to your career in the future, it can still be fun to take as a hobby and an added bonus for applying to college!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ashley’s Answer

I agree with Dan. Since we don’t know the college you are attending and major, definitely stick with English and Math. All majors require this at the 4 year schools. Other options would be Psychology or Sociology, American Government or US History. I would suggest doing one from each group, not both for the other options. If you do a language that’s fine but make sure the college offers it as well. Do some small research and see what are the general education requirements(first two years) and that will help as well. Something to think about Dual Enrollment your Junior & Senior year in high school. You will take college courses that will transfer back to your high school and give you credit as well. By the time you graduate high school, you could have at least 12-15 hrs of college work or even an Associate’s degree. Good luck and I wish you the very best!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Erin’s Answer

Samantha, I highly encourage you to take AP classes so you feel as prepared as possible for college-level courses. Many colleges/universities will accept AP courses as college credit which can accelerate the amount of time you need to complete an undergraduate degree, while reducing your foundational course workload. Each school is different, but I would suggest starting with English/literature or math and then taking on additional as you see fit in the future.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Dan’s Answer

I believe almost every college degree requires one or two classes in English and math so taking AP classes in them could allow you to start your college classes at a higher level and maybe even provide you actual college credits. If you are 100% undecided then start with English and math which are the most likely subjects for most degrees.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Lalita’s Answer

I am a retired teacher. These are the courses you need take for undeclared major in high school. These are AP courses that will help you prepare for higher studies.

English and math
Biology and chemistry if you are heading for a science major
American History

Other courses that would give you a little edge over in college are....
communication skills-spoken and written
computer skills- research, word process and spreadsheets

I hope this helps.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Stephen’s Answer

Hey, Samantha! That is a good question. Personally, courses you take in high school (math, history, English, science) help you prepare for any major, regardless of which you choose. If you don't plan to take all AP courses, I would recommend taking AP in courses you enjoy. For instance, I really enjoyed chemistry so AP Chem was a great fit. English on the other hand wasn't so great, so my junior and senior year decided to opt into normal English.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Gloria’s Answer

Hi Samantha,

You have gotten some great answers here. I would say that you should be selective about what classes you take as AP. The courses are designed to prepare you for college level work. As you move through high school, you are going to start seeing where your nature talent and skills lie. I would say that you should think of AP classes as taking advanced classes in a subject that 1) interests you and 2) you have a skill or nature affinity for. So why am I being so specific about this answer? When I was in high school, I got it into my head that to be considered smart, I had to take harder classes in Math than were required by my school. My ease with English and History made me think that because it was too easy, I was not really smart so I had to challenge myself in other ways. I know now that I am just not suited to advanced mathematics and was never going to be. You are going to do best in school and life in subjects that you like or come easy to you (hopefully both!). Your challenge with AP classes is knowing yourself. Looking back, I wish that I had focused on those subjects that I loved and pushed myself in those areas. I took AP Government and opted out of AP English for Journalism. I took Math all four years when I only needed two years. I signed up for the harder levels of math as well. I added to my stress and hurt my GPA for extra work that was not necessary and I have rarely used in my professional life.

Gloria
0