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How different are classes in college compared to high school and in what ways?

Are college classes truly harder and are the teachers less focused on individual students?

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Rebecca’s Answer

In the college, the most important is your self learning and training your critical thinking. In the postgraduate courses, there are still instructor led classes. This only takes about 30-40% of your learning. The professors / lecturers would give you ideas on the subjects and inspire. You would learn most when doing your assignments and projects.
On the other hand, there is tutorials in colleges. Usually, the lectures would be conducted in a lecture hall with a large number of students. Though you could ask questions in the lecture, it is encouraged and interactive with the tutors in the tutorials.
Your self learning motivation is very important. It also focuses to train your analyze skills. You may need to do a lot of research via different means including online, library, experiment (subject to your major), etc. to complete your assignments / projects in the college.
These are major differences I can think of.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Ryan’s Answer

In college, no one will be there to hold your hand and make sure you're getting your assignments and studying done. If you go to a big state university, there will be 100-200 students (or even more) per class and there's little one on one time with the professor unless you go to their office hours. Some classes are "harder" in the sense that they are new topics you will be unfamiliar with, while some may be things you're already exposed to.

A lot of college/university is on you, the student, but that doesn't make mean you can't ask for help from professors/tutors/classmates. It just means you have to be more proactive.
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Jesse’s Answer

Along with the additional answers provided above, one thing I found was the importance of connecting with your professor or TA (Teacher's Aide or Teaching Assistant). Many classes in college will have a TA or multiple TAs depending on the program or course. If your schedule allows and you are able, spending a few minutes before or after class connecting with the TA or professor and attending office hours are really great ways to get to connect with them. Especially if you are concerned with the attention and focus you would receive. In my experience, classes did tend to be harder as I was learning subjects I previously had not studied before and there was a larger need for self-studying and completing assignments outside of the classroom. Depending on where you go to school, there will be other great, motivated students as well. Building connections through study groups and attending office hours with your TA or professor will go a long way in getting the assistance you need while managing new changes. Best of luck!
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Madisyn’s Answer

College classes are different from high school classes because you have more responsibility. For example, if you aren't doing well in a particular subject in high school, the teacher may reach out to you to offer assistance. In college, it would be your responsibility to reach out the professor, seek tutoring or learn how to self-study if you aren't doing well in a particular subject. That is why most people find college classes to be harder; you are essentially in charge of your own education and grades.

I don't think this is something to be afraid of. It can be very rewarding when you pass college classes knowing that you took responsibility and put in the effort to pass your classes. Additionally, most professors are willing to help you if you seek out their assistance in passing their class.
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