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Updated 583 views Translated from Spanish .

Cuanto tiempo le llevó tanto pagar como completar su carrera?

How long did it take you to both pay and complete your degree?

work while you were studying? How to save to pay for your career? when he exercised his career had he already finished paying?

Thank you comment icon Hi Shecid! I translated your question from Spanish. Please be sure to select the correct language you are posting in when you create a new question! Hope you get some great advice soon 🙂 Alexandra Carpenter, Admin

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Caitlin’s Answer

I thought I would touch on another point on this subject. There are many ways to pay for school. Apply for FAFSA. Apply for grants. Schools have many many scholarships. If you are native to the country in which you live, sometimes you qualify for scholarships that can pay for your schooling. I had a few friends who paid nothing for school and received stipends(monthly living expenses but were not allowed to work during school). They also helped her find a job once she graduated. This was for an Associates Degree but it is a great way to great started! If you look at your states job site (for NJ we have https://nj.gov/nj/employ/ )it can have great resources. Talk to someone at your local college. School is only getting more expensive but they are also more ways to have it paid for or at least have some of it taken care of for you.
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Shiri’s Answer

Hi Shecid,

I finished my undergraduate degree with $20,000 worth of student debt. I had small scholarships that only covered part of my tuition, so I needed to take out small loans to make up for the difference. Eventually I got a campus job, which paid for housing, and I started my job just a couple of months after graduating. I started off paying large chunks of the debt because I had very few expenses otherwise. But since my expenses increased, I've been paying the debt off regularly, in smaller increments, and I'm set to pay it off next year, 2023. Considering I graduated in 2020, that's not that bad.

I think that everyone should do what's needed to pay for their education. If you need to work, part time to make tuition payments, do it. If you need to go to school part time to afford tuition payments, do it. Apply for as many scholarships as you can, whether through your school, your state officials, or even online scholarships being offered by various groups.
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M’s Answer

Hi Shecid! I went to a state school and received some financial aid. I graduated within 4 years with $10,000 in loans back in May of 2021. Due to the pandemic, interest on loans have been postponed to August of 2022. Thus far, I have not paid anything out of my pocket towards my loans. However, the company I work for has a student loan paydown where they are paying $100 a month towards my loans. Additionally, I worked throughout college and was able to save up to pay off my loans, which I would recommend doing. I did this by saving more than I spent. I would highly recommend applying for financial aid every year, looking and applying to scholarships, and also look at any other resources your school may have by talking to your university's financial aid office. Good luck, wishing you all the best!
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Dexter’s Answer

Hi Shecid,

Great question! For me, I finished my bachelor's degree at a public college over 4 years. I accrued about $20,000 dollars of debt and I paid that off over 4 years.

I worked part-time during the last two years of college (I believe I was paid $13/hr), and I was able to find work almost immediately after graduation. I'm pretty good at saving money, so even though my starting salary was $55k/year, I was able to make larger than expected payments against my debt.

I hope this data point helps you in your college decisions.
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Karen A.’s Answer

After completing one year of college, which I paid for by working two jobs and taking two student loans ($5,000 total), I was fortunate to go to work for a company that offered a tuition assistance program for full time employees. It covered tuition, and books and other fees. I had to maintain at least a C average to qualify for the tuition reimbursement. Since I could only attend school part time, it did take longer than if I were able to attend full time, but after six years, I graduated with zero education debt. I paid the initial two student loans off even before I graduated. Many large companies offer this benefit. Good luck!
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