Skip to main content
72 answers
76
Asked 1139 views Translate

What is being a remote worker like?

For those you of doing remote work, what is is like overall?

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
4. What is the earning potential of your work?
5. Do you enjoy it?

Feel free to add more beyond the questions I've posted. Thank you.
#career #money #online #job #jobs #remotework #internet #experience #technology #professional

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

76

72 answers


4
Updated Translate

Sajal’s Answer

Hello,
I feel I am a suitable candidate to answer this. I have worked in an office, in the field, and remotely from home. All in computer-related jobs. For the last 5 years, I am working remotely as I am part of a global team for which location does not matter. I am a full-time employee of VMware Inc. and I work regular hours. Beyond my regular 8 am to 5 pm, I am not expected to be available. Though exceptions occur when handling urgent matters. But, overall, in general, I work 40 hour weeks. In terms of compensation, there is no change for me. I get paid as much as someone in the office (actually all my team members work from home :) ). So, that is not a problem.
Now comes the experience. I always worked from home but not the customers. Since the pandemic, the majority of us work from home, leading to more zoom meetings than ever. Not necessarily all of them are useful meetings.
In terms of getting work done, I get more work done working from home than being in the office. I have more time for study or personal betterment as well.
The best part for me though I can see my daughter (coincidently she is five and half years old) grow up in front of my eyes. While going to the office we spend the entire day outside and we hardly get to see them. While working from home, I can spend more time with her. I see her grow up. That is something I value a lot.
So, do I spend more time at work? Yes and no. Yes, because my relaxation and passion both are related to computers. So, if I am not working, I am working on my personal projects or reading something. Screen time increased a lot. Work time is reduced, as I do not spend time with "socializing", "traveling to and fro from office" etc. I spend that time at work and hence finish my work way early. This frees up time for other things and I am more flexible now. I do not mind working a bit odd hours as I am still at home.
Overall, also, it depends on what type of person you are. If you like socializing, you will miss physical office attendance. I will feel isolated and lonely (workforce-wise). But if you are somewhat reserved, then it is absolutely fine. I do have an amazing relationship with co-workers. Still, sometimes wish I can visit the office though.
All in all, it has positives and negatives. But for me, it has more positives than negatives. I am accustomed to working this way and enjoy it.
At the end of the day, I can spend more time with family and that matters.
Hope this is helpful.
4
4
Updated Translate

Alexandra’s Answer, CareerVillage.org Team

Hi Julie!

This is a really great question. I see you have several great answers already, but I’m adding my perspective as somebody who has ALWAYS been remote (not forced remote by COVID.) I’ve been remote in various capacities ranging from volunteer to part-time employee, but for about 6 years now!

1. I’m a part-time employee, though have been here several years, so my projects are similar to full-timers but on a more flexible hourly basis. I get to do a lot of different things since we’re a startup, so there’s always something interesting for me to do. Remote HAS NOT meant boring or repetitive!

2. Inherently yes it is. However, those who used to be on-site had flexibility as well (for example, had remote days or control over when they were in the office.) It was not a strict “9 AM must be in seat” situation. 😊

3. Being part-time, I’m paid hourly (generously, though!) Being remote also eliminates expenses and lost time from transportation. I lived in a city for a while and this could REALLY add up. Plus, I don’t think it’s reasonable to expect people to be productive on public transit. So that’s a huge weight off my shoulders and I’m fortunate because many people are at the mercy of transit systems that are expensive, never on time, and sometimes even unsafe.

4. This is hard to say since part-time employment is legally capped in some ways (once you hit a certain # of hours, there are additional requirements for employers like offering more benefits and such.) However, even if I worked just under that cap, hourly earnings would still be more than enough for my current situation. For the full-timers here, I’ve always gotten the impression everyone was well accommodated — CareerVillage is a very supportive team of staff and things like FMLA & parental leave are not things you have to fight for (nor should you!) Notable that a nonprofit by nature is not a place where earning potential is infinite, regardless of remote/in-office. It’s definitely a sector for those motivated by the work they do, not so much for those motivated by attaining higher earnings over time (which, to be fair, still mobilizes people to do amazing work. It’s just different.)

5. I absolutely enjoy it, and always have! There’s some extra effort on my part to remain disciplined (and I don’t always succeed at that), because I’ve otherwise always had watchful eyes nearby or a boss who could breathe down my neck if they felt they needed to. It’s taken time to find the right resources to help me stay organized, find a cadence for my lifestyle that works for the position, and stay abreast of important information without overwhelming myself with notifications during my off-hours. Remote workers should budget time early on to establish routines and self-organize, and if you aren’t your own worst critic, remote work is going to be hard in general. It’s hard to compete with the benefits of being remote, though. In COVID times, I can see it being more challenging for some people than it is helpful — especially those without a choice but to be remote. So the temptation to work remote is something to consider, I think. It’s not a good fit for everyone, but it really works for me!

Another thing I’ll add that goes beyond your questions: I underestimated how beneficial remote work would be for my quality of life as someone with a disability. That’s a huge part of what makes remote work overall suited for me. It’s hard for me to believe that I spent so long as a student with such a rigid structure and still remained sane (barely, some days!) Being remote has helped me learn a lot about myself and what my needs are, and has helped me “reset” in some ways. Knowing how much more productive I’m capable of being working remote has been a shock, because I used to struggle so much to do much less. It’s 4 AM right now and not unusual for me to be working at this hour — my disability means that I’m naturally a bit nocturnal and also sleep periodically during the typical workday. If I was working in the vast majority of non-remote situations, I’d be trapped in the typical 9-5 (and really no reasonable way I’d expect my employer to accommodate me differently.) For me, being awake & productive might be moments from falling into deep sleep. So too is being “at work” versus “out of office”, and that’s why remoting is a good fit for me. It’s not a good fit for everyone, though, and will depend dramatically on both the requirements of the job & the person performing it. If you are considering a remote position, it’s a good time to make sure you know yourself well enough to make an educated decision. I would not advise someone to take a chance on remote work thinking that it will just be “easier” or “more lax.” Your social compass is also important to consider: in the wake of COVID, I realized I had very few social connections with people I could see in person. Since I live with family, I’m still around others on a normal day, but loneliness is something that is a really serious hindrance for some, both for work performance and for wellbeing overall. Many full-timers here at CareerVillage take advantage of public locations with internet access (coffee shops, common spaces in apartments, etc.) to do their work, which I highly recommend. The workplace is a social hub we take for granted, so realize this will be something you risk losing in a remote position.

I hope this is all informative to you & others! Definitely take the advice you get together as one — all of these different perspectives offer something different and give you a broader view of remote work in general.

Alexandra, CareerVillage.org Team recommends the following next steps:

As you read the advice you receive, ask yourself which Professionals you feel you align with the most. Remote work is very individual, and you might find people like yourself having a better/worse experience.
Assess your wants and needs, and how remote work will affect them.
Know thyself! Do some soul-searching and be honest with yourself about the kind of worker you are. What motivates you? What hinders you? What will these things mean for you if you are remoting?
If you start remote work, prioritize self-organizing and building a schedule that works for everyone. If you feel you are strained, even with small things, ask others for advice or talk to your employer. They might get you into habits or introduce you to tools that you may not have found yourself.
You already have independent contractor experience, which is fantastic! For those who don’t, this is a safer way to explore remoting if you’re not sure it will work for you. Don’t commit to a position on a hunch that it will be low-stakes.
4
1
Updated Translate

Jacqueline’s Answer

1. I work full-time in Business Operations Support, which is project based working on iniatives to support the field organizations. The position is hybrid meaning I am in the office a couple of days a week.
2. Yes, I would say it is flexible however being a remote working means having a distinctive work space in your home. It is important to have an office and carve out space and time for working that is separate from your personal space/family. Sometimes remote workers can work longer hours because it is convenient to continue to work or to go back to your desk after dinner. Work/Life balance is important to maintain when working remotely.
3. We are compensated the same as those working in the office doing similar work. I am salaried but we do have hourly employees that are working remotely and they are paid for the work that they do.
4. I have been with my company for almost 30 years and am compensated fairly. Earning potential is based on education and experience. Continued learning will increase your earning potential in any position you seek in the business field.
5. I do enjoy my work very much, although a lot of my team building is done on video conferencing I still feel I have had the opportunity to get the know the people on my team well. However, I do also enjoy the times we are able to be face-to-face.
1
1
Updated Translate

Gregory’s Answer

There are pros and cons to being a remote worker and it really comes down to the individual. I have been in the workforce for the last 25 years and have never been remote until the pandemic. However the last 2 years we have been remote and I have really enjoyed the experience and find the quality of my life has improved in many ways. I have spent more time with my family, found it easier to exercise and gotten much more sleep as a result of being home. The personal connection with my peers and employees is something I do miss though. Zoom and other forms of live meetings have helped but that is not quite the same.

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) management employee
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? Absolutely
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) Salary
4. What is the earning potential of your work? Excellent and has not changed since moving to remote.
5. Do you enjoy it? I really do enjoy it. I have been able to be much more involved with family activities and doing things outside. I miss the personal connection with my collogues and that is the one thing I dislike about being fully remote. For me personally a hybrid model would work best. However the flexibility of being home has been great for me and I would not want to go back to the office fulltime.
1
1
Updated Translate

John’s Answer

Julie lot of the work that can be done remotely nowadays can also be done on a flexible schedule. For example, if content creator, you can most likely do your writing whenever it suits you as long as you meet your deadlines. So, night owls, rejoice! You can still put in your eight hours without starting at 8 AM. If you do need to work specific hours, you’re sure to still have some break time—time you can use however you’d like! Even if you have just 10 minutes, you can do something that just wouldn’t be possible in a traditional office: take a refreshing power nap. You’re guaranteed to come back feeling more refreshed than you would after 10 minutes at your desk surfing Facebook. With some willpower and a steady routine, you’ll soon learn to avoid being distracted by the TV or your next load of laundry. And, in fact, you should find yourself getting more done when you work remotely. That’s because you can control your working situation much more—you don’t have to worry about co-workers stopping by to “just ask a quick question” (and 20 minutes later...), obligatory socializing when you grab more coffee, or offending someone by shutting the door to your office. Being able to set your own hours is the most obvious benefit of working from home. As mentioned, it can be tricky finding that healthy balance between your home life and your work responsibilities. Once you do find a good balance, however, the flexibility and freedom that comes with working remotely can be liberating and empowering.

Think about how many interruptions and distractions you get at work. There’s the constant operational noise of the office, co-workers dropping by your desk to chat or ask a question, water cooler conversations, and meetings to attend. Some adjustments to your work schedule may need to be made to accommodate phone or video conference calls or occasional visits to the office. But for the most part, you can dictate when your work gets done. If you’re able to work from a home office, you’ll also have a little more flexibility with where you can live. You won’t be as tied down to being located within a short commute to your office…because your office is just a few steps away from where you woke up. Designing your home office space for maximum productivity is one key part of developing and maintaining a productive home working routine. One of the great benefits of telecommuting is you can shape your own workspace design any way you want. Most shared office spaces are sterile and have lousy artificial lighting. That type of working environment can make it harder to focus and get the most out of your workday.

As attractive as working from home may seem, it’s admittedly not for everybody. There are challenges, such as maintaining a productive balance between home and work. Less social contact and not being able to network in person with co-workers may also prove to be a difficult adjustment for some. For most of us, however, the idea of working remotely from a home office is very appealing. Whether you’re working remotely or self-employed and working from home, there are definite benefits to having your workspace where you live.

Hope this is helpful Julie
1
1
Updated Translate

Zahid’s Answer

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
Full time employee, office/computer based job.

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
In this field, it's usually pretty flexible regardless of being onsite or remote.

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
The pay is the same, it's usually not affected by the where you work. Some companies do offer compensation to off set the expense of working from home, such as paying your internet.

4. What is the earning potential of your work?
The earning potential depends on the industry and field you are in more so then where you are working from. This software development has a pretty good earning potential.

5. Do you enjoy it?
Yes. Remote work is possibly the best work arrangement if you want to manage your personal life better while staying productive at your work

What is is like overall?

Most people you will find to be quiet happy with working remotely. They are able to concentrate/focus better on their jobs, don't have to worry about traveling, getting up early to get ready, or rushing home to make dinner. It's also lot better for mental health.

People who are working remotely tend to be more productive as compared to their in-office counterparts. Several reasons account for the enhanced productivity of remote workers. One such reason is lesser distractions. Moreover, many remote jobs allow you to work outside the regular 9-5 office hours. You can work at different times of the day when you are more productive. Even employers won’t mind your flexible work schedule as long as you are completing your tasks on time.

It offers better work-life balance. Not commuting to work means that you can save a significant amount of time. Thus, you can utilize these saved hours to have some quality time with your family. Also, by getting some extra time daily to manage personal life, remote workers can be more happy and satisfied with their jobs.

It helps lead a healthier lifestyle. Since you are not commuting back and forth, with all the extra time you can cook and eat nutritious food and even involve yourself in multiple exercise sessions throughout the day.

Another key advantage of working remotely is that you can save more money each year. Just imagine, all the bills that you pay for your transportation, parking tickets, vehicle maintenance, eating lunch in a fancy restaurant, etc. cease to exist. All these savings become a reality when you are working remotely. Some of my co-workers are spending $200-$500 on transportation alone with gas prices and taking the toll road coming from so far away.

So over all it's a pretty good, especially for introverts. Extroverts may have a harder time as they feel there is a communication gap without that in person communication. They also find it hard to stay motivated and the lack of social interaction makes them feel lonely. It can also be difficult for those who do not know how to manage their time, who get distracted easily and those who do not have a home environment and space that allows them to work remote peacefully.
1
1
Updated Translate

Kelly’s Answer

Great question!

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) - I am a full time employee in the insurance industry.
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? - I find it to be comparable - and if anything, we work more hours. There is no commute time, no need to make/go pick up lunch. One has to set good personal boundaries to ensure that work does not consume all of their time. Our core work hours have not and will not change as a result of remote work.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) - Salary
4. What is the earning potential of your work? - Great earning potential for those who have clear performance goals and achieve them.
5. Do you enjoy it? - Yes! Why? I have the ability to work from different locations (assuming I ensure proper internet connection; a quiet/private environment in which to conduct virtual meetings).
1
1
Updated Translate

dave’s Answer

Personally I have been working remotely for more than 12 years and Love the flexibility

If you are Lucky enough to have a boss that does NOT micromanage you!

Commissions are obviously also a big plus-I have worked on straight salary and salary plus commissions....

Also now remote is more the Norm so there should be many more job opportunities

good luck!
1
1
Updated Translate

YC’s Answer

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
Full time employee. Work as Regulatory Engineer.

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
It is more flexible to work remotely. For examples if the office hour ends at 5pm, after 5pm you are immediately at home. Sound great right?

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
Remain the same due to my job nature is not commission based. The company does provide a one-time stipend to help employees set up a home office.

4. What is the earning potential of your work?
Pretty good 😊

5. Do you enjoy it?
Yes, I can start and end the day as I choose, as long as the work is completed and attend necessary meetings. Another benefit is reduced commute stress and fees. Occasionally public transport might break down due to certain reasons, once might get panic due to can’t reach office in time. Transportation fees and travel time can totally be eliminated as well. And the most important thing is less exposure to illness.
There are always pros and cons depending on the individual and circumstances. Personally prefer work remotely.

1
1
Updated Translate

Susan’s Answer

Hi, I am a remote worker due to COVID. Before that I had been an 'in office worker' for 33 years so this has been a change. I beleive you need to be self disciplined and organized to be a successful remote worker. You need to make sure to communicate effectively with people on your team and others in your organization. In addition, you need to make sure your leadership knows you are available and completing your work. I beleive it also helps to have a good at home set up (desk, good chair, quite space).

I am a full time salary employee as a Project Manager. I love this work! It is fast paced and there is always somthing new so I am never board. Earning potential as a Project Manager can vary depending on industry, responsibilites and education. Getting a PMP Certification will help.

My company has flexible start hours but we have core hours we need to be available (9AM - 4PM) and need to work 8 hrs per day. I still feel like remote work does provide more flexiblity. I can talk a walk around my neighborhood when I have a break and when I am done working I don't have to commute! But I also find myself working more hours at times because my 'office' is in my home.

Hope this information helps!
1
1
Updated Translate

Robert’s Answer

I am an employee. I had worked from home for over 10 years. The company had decided to reduce cost by closing some real estate (offices and call centers). Working from home has its advantages and disadvantages.

Advantages:
No commute - In the morning - wake up, shower, get dressed, breakfast and you're set for work. After work - lock up and walk away.
Greener earth - because of no driving; saves gas too.
Conveniences of home - comforts of home and items you need are within your home.
Quieter environment - I am an empty-nester, wife works; so I am all alone during working hours. No office noise, no office chatter, no distraction.
More productive - as the environment is quieter, it is more conducive for work, ramping up productivity.
Lower vehicle insurance - as one doesnt need to commute for work 5x a week, insurance would drop by a bit -- make sure to inform your insurance agent of this arrangement/change.
Continuity of work - as one need not power down the computer, work continuity the following day is much smoother. When on-call, one can quickly react to pages/alerts.
A bit of flexibility in working hours

Disadvantages:
Tend to eat more - as it offers convenience of home, food and snack is readily available
Harder to walk away after work - "just have to finish this work before I walk away" - more often, one works a bit longer because one need not worry about the commute back home.
Easier to skip lunch on busy days - too preoccupied with work, tend to skip lunch - because it is within easy reach - need not commute to eat lunch
Occasional interruptions - though not as bad as office noise and as often as office distractions (when a colleague drops in for a friendly chat); on rare occasion, door-to-door salesmen or solicitors come knocking.
A bit extra on the cooling and heating bills - but it far better than commuting and cost of gas.
Social skills suffer a bit - as there is virtually no person-to-person interactions. Compensate this with meeting friends or co-workers out of office hours (eg lunch out)

Pre-pandemic, most remote work are done by IT employees - programmers, architects, etc. These are mostly salaried positions - for hourly positions, over time pay is paid - else compensatory leaves maybe granted. Earning potential can be quite varied depending on length of experience, skill level, and scope of work.

Working from home can be tough for others to adjust after the initial thrill wears off. But with time, one can learn to enjoy it. It is important to take breaks to stretch, do relaxation exercises, eat lunch, hydrate -- all these are easier said than done, but depends on one's will-power.

I hope I have given you my unbiased insights. Good luck.
1
1
Updated Translate

Stacia’s Answer

1. What kind of work do you do? I lead a team responsible for providing technical support for video, data and voice. My job is to create strategy on how this team resolves the issue and provide the best possible customer service.
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? The flexibility comes in to play because there is no commute which provides me additional time in the morning and evening to do things like exercise, family functions, errands etc.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) Salaried
4. What is the earning potential of your work? It varies depending on the level - entry, mid, executive
5. Do you enjoy it? Absoutely. I love working on large teams.
1
0
Updated Translate

Carl’s Answer

Hi Paajcha. For knowledge workers, working remotely is the norm. My current role is a Project Manager for Verizon. I manage projects designed to implement various components of 5G. There is a core team in my same location but the majority of the people I work with are in various locations around the world. My day is spent coordinating with stakeholders via Bluejeans Meetings, Slack, and of course phone calls. Communications is key. Everyone doesn't work in the same time zone so we have to consider that when scheduling meetings and making phone calls. Also determining the mechanism of communications. Quick answers may only require a Slack message, team efforts may required a Bluejeans Meeting, and an more in-dept answer from an individual may require a phone call. We are often on video during our interactions. Working remotely, it's very important to connect with those you are working with. Visual, non-verbal communications is even more heigtened in a remote work environment.
0
0
Updated Translate

Heather’s Answer

I have been working remote for about 9 years now and love it! Prior to my working completely remote, I did go into the office 2-3 per week; however things changed within my company and my supervisor relocated to a different state. Being in the office was no longer a requirement so I simply transitioned to working permanently from home.

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) - I am currently a project manager within a chief of staff team; however I have previous experience as an Executive Assistant along with retail and property management skills.
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? Working remotely does provide more flexibility schedule wise, but it would probably depend on the employer and core hours of the business.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) - I am compensated through annual salary along with a bonus dependent upon specific business metrics that must be met within my organization.
4. What is the earning potential of your work? My company has a salary range for my specific title along with others; however project managers could potentially earn from approximately $50,000 to $150,000 pending level of experience and geographic location. Certain certifications may earn you even more pending the field.
5. Do you enjoy it? I have always loved working from home and the flexibility it has afforded me over the years. The one piece of advice I would offer someone looking to work remote if they have not done so before is to be organized, dedicated and have excellent time management skills.

0
0
Updated Translate

Lisa Bond’s Answer

Hi Julie,
I did not start out as a remote worker. I had an office in an office building but due to the pandemic, my team and I are remote and will remain as remote workers even when other departments return. Overall, I like remote work. Most of my colleagues are located in other parts of the country, so the ability to be remote works, because I would not be having face-to-face meetings anyway.

I am a full-time, salaried employee. Remote work has allowed me flexibility because I am not necessarily strapped to my desk as long as I have my laptop, wifi, and my phone I can work from anywhere. Though my commute is 15 seconds versus 1.5 hours, I probably work more hours now than I did as an office worker. The key to remote work is work-life balance. I structure my day, just like I did when I worked in an office. We are generally on camera in my organization, so I get up and dress like I'm leaving my home. It puts me in the mindset of an office. I don't have the television going but may listen to music as I work. I miss seeing co-workers and the "water cooler" discussions that naturally occur as a result of being near each other, but I make sure I carve out the time to check in with members of my team and my colleagues.

There are positives and negatives to all situations, but for me remote work is a positive experience.
0
0
Updated Translate

Dave’s Answer

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
I've been a remote worker for around 6 years as a full-time employee. I've been both a Software Engineer and an Engineering manager in that time.

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
For hours, it can be more flexible. It can vary a lot depending on company culture and policy. In general I've tried to stay around 40 hours a week. I have struggled at times to not pick up my laptop at night and start doing more work while watching TV. It's important to have a good culture around limiting the amount you work as it would be really easy to work a bunch of hours, without any extra compensation.

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
I'm paid salary.

4. What is the earning potential of your work?
There's quite a range in technology field, but that can vary by the country you live in.

5. Do you enjoy it?
I really enjoy working remotely. I appreciate being able to stand up and take a break whenever you need. Places I've worked have allowed me to flex hours around appointments or other life events without having to use my time off.
0
0
Updated Translate

Antonio’s Answer

Hey Julie,
I've been working as a remote for a year and a half; and this will continue for a long time, so...

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) I'm employee, Sales Operations Analyst
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? It depends, you need to be more strict to yourself because there is no one to tell you is time to leave, and there is no feeling of "I need to leave now because of the time it takes to return home"; but when you acknowledge that you are still working, that there is really no difference and that those "Five more minutes because I'm already at my house and i can finish this so that tomorrow i can leave earlier" thoughts are irrelevant because you would still find more work, then you can stablish a really nice and balanced day.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) Every company is different, but for my case, I was compensated so that I can pay some electric and internet bills, and also to set my own home office.
4. What is the earning potential of your work? Depends on the company and the career path, but trust me when I say that you can save more on a remote work.
5. Do you enjoy it? Yeah, obviously I miss my team and being at the office at some moments, but i can sleep more, do more things in the day and still be productive. Also, I save more money because I don't have to pay for gas, food or other things.

Hope this helps,
Good luck!
0
0
Updated Translate

Jodi’s Answer

I have been working at home for several years now. There are a lot of pros: I save money on gas and food and am able to work from the comfort of my own home. The hardest part I would say is lack of face to face interaction with my coworkers. While there is always Zoom or other video conferencing available, it definitely is different and takes some time to get used to. While it did take some getting used to, I enjoy working from home. It allows me the flexibility I need as a working mom of 3 young children. I work in the health insurance industry and am able to do my job successfully exclusively from home. In my case, the compensation is comparable and fair and I see no difference in that aspect as if I were going into the office daily. I do feel that since I moved to working remotely I actually am more productive because there are fewer distractions, but I also find myself working more hours as I do not take a very long lunch break, if I take one at all. Overall, I would recommend working from home. While it is not the best fit for everyone, it is for me and my family.
0
0
Updated Translate

Jeff’s Answer

I love working from home because it is an environment that is comfortable and at the same time I'm able to be productive in the hours that are meaningful to me as well as the company of which I work.

It is important to manage expectations by minimizing distractions and setting up a place where you can comfortably work and be on conference calls/virtual meetings. The two biggest obstacles I find is that I don't get up and move as much as I should and don't take as many breaks as are afforded to me. I am working to get better in those areas.

But I will say that the thinking from companies is changing. Prior to Covid, the idea was that it was absolutely necessary to be in a brick and mortar to do your work. But in my job, I interact with people from various countries and my manager and director live across the US from my location. A brick and mortar would not add any value to the work I do. Working remotely is a privilege and shouldn't be abused but is also rewarding in so many ways.
0
0
Updated Translate

Robyn’s Answer

What is being a remote worker like? I find it very rewarding. I can get more work done by eliminating the commute time, as I live in a very populated area, where a 16 mile commute takes 45 min. on average.
For those you of doing remote work, what is is like overall? Overall, it is good, but I am at the end of my working career and I have built relationships already, throughout the 20 years of in person/in office work. I think it is important to have some in person, in office time if possible.

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) employee (21 years at the same company)
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? much more flexible and without the commute and interruptions from employees near by, I can get more work done.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) salary
4. What is the earning potential of your work?
5. Do you enjoy it? yes, very much
0
0
Updated Translate

Stephen’s Answer

Working remotely has plusses and minuses.
Plusses:
More actual hours available to work
No commuting time to work
Convenient access to kitchen and bathrooms
Minuses:
Face to face interaction
Inability to just "stop by their desk"

All in all, remote working is not a way of working that suits everyone. It works well for me, I am at the end of my working career and spent 25+ years of that career at the executive level, during which I was able to coach, teach and mentor many talented people, several of who surpassed me all the way up to the CEO level. To do this required face to face interaction and open door policy. I encouraged my team to walk into my office every day and ask questions or share ideas or share their challenges and mistakes. This is harder to do remotely.
Younger associates benefit from that type of interaction and regretfully , working from home does not benefit them. I would encourage younger, ambitious and passionate people to make an effort to get back into the workplace and interact with leadership to learn why they are successful so you can follow.
So in conclusion, I am saying is that remote working can be good for some but not for many others - it is dependent upon age and job function.

Good luck in this challenging time and let me know how I can help you to grow (remotely!!)
0
0
Updated Translate

Don’s Answer

This is a great question. The world's changed, and remote work, or some in-office/at home hybrid arrangement, is here to stay. One of the ripple effects of the pandemic has been a sea change in how, where and when organizations get stuff done, and offering increased flexibility in working arrangements is now part of the table stakes companies must offer to attract and retain talent.

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) -- Full time employee
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? -- It's largely the same, though as others have said you often end up working longer days without the commute, just with more flexibility to answer the door, make your lunch, etc.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) -- Salaried.
4. What is the earning potential of your work? -- My organization offers a very generous compensation and benefits package.
5. Do you enjoy it? -- As an introvert by nature, I was built for remote work, which offers enough interaction virtually through meetings without the interruptions and distractions of the office environment. It really depends on personal preference and personality, though.

0
0
Updated Translate

Geri’s Answer

I've spent most of my career in an office until 2020. I found it easy to move from the office to home but at times miss the in-office interaction. I'm later in my career and tend to think if I was newer to the workforce I'd want to be in the office on a hybrid basis. I think it is easier to network in the office and meet people outside of your team. I work in Investor Relations and since investors are all over the world it's an easy job to do remotely.
I eliminated a long commute which added a lot of time to my day and focusing is a lot easier b/c people are not "stopping by your office". So, I think there is more flexibility b/c I tend to be more productive with my day. You definitely need to have strong time management skills and be a self-starter. I do miss the water cooler talk and being able to just drop in someone's office to get an update on the business.

Geri recommends the following next steps:

Lots of leaders are talking about the benefits of each - hybrid, in-office, and fully remote so it may also help to do a search on this in the news or on linkedin and see what stance companies are taking on this topic.
0
0
Updated Translate

Sharhonda’s Answer

Hi Julie!

1. I work full time in internal audit for a private, multinational company.

2. It’s more flexible to my personal life but I work the same, if not more, hours daily just because work is home and home is work. COVID forced us to remote work but we are now permanently remote. Prior to COVID I had the ability to work remote occasionally.

3. I’m salary and am still salary.

4. Above average for my market and includes a bonus structure.

5. I enjoy it quite a bit, it allows me to actually have that unicorn called life/work balance but I second Naomi’s answer regarding setting boundaries.
0
0
Updated Translate

Angela’s Answer

Hello! Working from home has been great. I've always been an in office employee but have been working from home since the pandemic started. I was promoted into a new position that is fully remote, regardless of when my company decides to send employees back in. I really enjoy it. My work/life balance has changed completely. I now have time to rest a bit more and to exercise or walk my dog in the middle of the day. My stress level has decreased dramatically.
I recommend you think about your strengths, communication style and where you are at in your career. I do feel that being in the office with my peers when I first started my career was great and I wouldn't have changed that. Now that I'm more experienced, I am happy to be home and don't feel the need to be amongst peers.
I hope this helps!
0
0
Updated Translate

Sharon’s Answer

I have been working from home since I started my job at Verizon. Prior to joining , I worked from home about 3 days a week at another company. The good things about working from home is flexibility -- no commute in the traffic- and Verizon has been excellent about suppling the support equipment I need. I have to be more focused on providing agenda, creating meeting notes and ensuring the we do follow-ups.

I do miss talking to my fellow team members -- getting out about around the office and feeding off their energy. A conference call do not replace the human interaction. But working remote allows me interact with people across the world which is great.

You do need to shut off work. --pick a place where you can work, set a time when will not be working --and take some breaks -- working from home allows me to walk around the neighborhood.

Challenges occur when internet goes down or you hear your husband conference calls. This issue could happen in the office.

But the positives still out weigh the negatives. I love it.

0
0
Updated Translate

Jeff’s Answer

I love working from home. I'm in a comfortable environment and find that I'm more productive than when I had to commute. The downside is that I tend to overwork and not take the breaks I need to take through out the day and week.
0
0
Updated Translate

M’s Answer

Hi Paajcha! This is a great question!
1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) I am an employee at a big four accounting firm and I work as a consultant.
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? I would say yes. Not having to work on site, means I do not have to worry about commuting so I save time there. Also, previously my job required traveling, but now it rarely requires travel.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) I am compensated by salary.
4. What is the earning potential of your work? There is so much room for growth working in a big four, from learning technical skills and specific job related items, you learn professionalism and how to work most efficiently which is something every strong company needs.
5. Do you enjoy it? I do enjoy it. What I find most enjoyable is being able to work on several different projects with different people, it never gets boring.
0
0
Updated Translate

Gary’s Answer

Great question. Overall I love being a remote worker, I am introverted so remote work is good for me. I am more comfortable dealing with people on the phone, on video chat, email and messenger. I love my home office, I have it set up just the way I like it. I can take time during the day to be with my dog and my wife who also works remote. The only downside is that sometimes I would like to visit with my coworkers but they are all very far away and we dont see each other often.

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
I am a Recruiter for a technical college in Texas

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
Yes, the standard hours are Monday-Friday, 800a-500p but I do work later or earlier sometimes.

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
I am compensated by salary only since I work for the State of Texas

4. What is the earning potential of your work?
Recruiters can make $40-80,000 per year.

5. Do you enjoy it?
Yes, I do enjoy my work very much. I get to help Managers hire people for their teams and I get to work with people that want to work for our college.
0
0
Updated Translate

Robin’s Answer

For those you of doing remote work, what is is like overall?
Overall, working remotely is not bad. It has it's pros (can jump out of bed and get started if you want) and cons (lack of face-to-face contact).

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
I am a full-time communications manager for a health insurance provider.

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
Before the pandemic, our company had flexible starting hours (a two-hour window) and our division allowed some work-from-home days at the department director's discretion. But there are still times you are expected to be working. You can't start at noon or in the evening and work until past midnight as a work day. You have to be available during business hours. If you choose to work earlier or later, that's optional but you don't get overtime as a salaried worker.
Most of my team was already working from home four days a week when the pandemic hit. It is easier to get your workday started if you don't have to find clothes, prepare a lunch and work your way through traffic. Depending on what type of work you do, it's also easy to work longer hours when you should be calling it a day (if you're a salaried worker).

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
I'm compensated via a straight salary.

4. What is the earning potential of your work?
My work has very good earning potential. I started with this company as a contractor 11 years ago making $30/hour. I make much more than that now as a manager.

5. Do you enjoy it?
Yes, I enjoy my job (even though it is quite stressful at times) and the people I work with. However, I do miss the camaraderie of being in the office with my team and those from other teams. There is something lost when you work 100% remote; team building and bonding is much more of a challenge. New people coming in don't get meaningful opportunities to get to know everyone on the team, only those they work with directly. So there are disadvantages to working remotely all the time.
0
0
Updated Translate

Marlissa’s Answer

1. What kind of work do you do?
I work for a health insurance company in Michigan, where I am an operations manager. I oversee a small help desk, and have responsibility for two vendor programs.

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? There is more flexibility, as I am not traveling to an office and have the ability the step out here and there, but this is similar to how I would perform within an office setting as well. We are still required to keep standard business hours, but often feel that we work more being remote. Additionally I have a corporate cell with instant messaging and online meeting resource, this makes me available at all times of the day.

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) Salary

4. What is the earning potential of your work? Good earning potential based on promotions and advancements.

5. Do you enjoy it? Yes I do, however prior to the pandemic we were set to move from 60% remote to 100% remote, the transition has been easy for myself as I am a very versatile mobile worker. Some of the downsides resides with direct reports and phone systems that we depend on. At times a face to face meeting would really benefit some employees due to possible retraining needs. Working fully remote makes this process difficult at times, however we work through this with the tools we have like online meeting resources, instant massaging etc.

Lastly - I think to make the remote work life work efficiently you need a plan, lots of boundaries and a personality that can be a self-starter or at least a person that reaches out to others.
0
0
Updated Translate

Jon’s Answer

For those you of doing remote work, what is is like overall? On the plus side, I do not have to commute! This saves me literally hours per week that I don't have to sit in traffic, which is sometimes bumper-to-bumper. On the other hand though, I really do like working side-by-side with my teams and peers, and in-person is the best way to do that. Trying to do that type remotely is certainly possible, but you miss out on the human elements and the "connection" that comes with working onsite.

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) I am a Product Director in healthcare IT and I am an employee.
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? It is more flexible, but I do find myself working longer hours.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) I am salaried.
4. What is the earning potential of your work? Given Product Management has many tiers (i.e. Analyst, Product Owner, Product Manager, Product Director, Managing Director of Product), there is substantial opportunity for career pathing and earnings potential.
5. Do you enjoy it? I very much like my work! Solving healthcare IT/technical and business problems is very challenging and rewarding at the same time. I work with health plans, providers and internal stakeholders; each group presents their unique scenarios but ultimately their needs are all related and intermingled. You learn a fair amount of healthcare jargon and vocabulary, so that is an initial hurdle, but once you get over that hump and it is much easier to navigate conversations.
0
0
Updated Translate

Antonio’s Answer

Hey Julie,
I've been working as a remote for a year and a half; and this will continue for a long time, so...

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) I'm employee, Sales Operations Analyst
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? It depends, you need to be more strict to yourself because there is no one to tell you is time to leave, and there is no feeling of "I need to leave now because of the time it takes to return home"; but when you acknowledge that you are still working, that there is really no difference and that those "Five more minutes because I'm already at my house and i can finish this so that tomorrow i can leave earlier" thoughts are irrelevant because you would still find more work, then you can stablish a really nice and balanced day.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) Every company is different, but for my case, I was compensated so that I can pay some electric and internet bills, and also to set my own home office.
4. What is the earning potential of your work? Depends on the company and the career path, but trust me when I say that you can save more on a remote work.
5. Do you enjoy it? Yeah, obviously I miss my team and being at the office at some moments, but i can sleep more, do more things in the day and still be productive. Also, I save more money because I don't have to pay for gas, food or other things.

Hope this helps,
Good luck!
0
0
Updated Translate

Brendon’s Answer

I am a full-time employee that works from home from time to time. It's extremely flexible, more so than being in the office for an 8 hour shift. I get compensated the same. The earning potential of my line of work is fair. I love it because I can be comfortable, have my own custom setup and it's more peaceful.
0
0
Updated Translate

Karuna’s Answer

I've been doing remote work since the pandemic began, and will likely be hybrid after. There are definitely pros and cons, and I think I'd prefer to be hybrid with some days in an office, and some at home. My best scenario would be picking and choosing when to come in so that if something comes up I can deal with it from home, or if I want to travel I can do so without using PTO.

1. I'm an employee, working in business intelligence/data analytics
2. It's more flexible, but that's a double-edged sword because while it means we can work whenever, it also usually means we end up working late (and as an exempt employee we're not paid overtime for it)
3. Salaried with an annual performance bonus
4. Depends on the career path, but starting salaries for entry-level is probably in the 60-90k range depending on location
5.I do enjoy it, but will also be grateful to return for 1-2 days per week
0
0
Updated Translate

Frank’s Answer

1. I was a contract employee for a company for almost 9 years that worked for multiple lines of business. (This was all before the pandemic)

2. Hours were flexible which was nice since life events can happen and working from home made it easier to make up hours if needed.

3. I was an hourly employee.

4. The earning potential was based on how much you wanted to put into the work. If you work hard, you will move up the ladder and get a Team that work under you.

5. It was a different type of experience. I have some great memories from working remotely with co workers but you do miss out on that in person social interactions that instant messaging or emails do not always convey. It all depends on the type of personality you have.
0
0
Updated Translate

Bernadette’s Answer

What a terrific question!!

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
I am a full time employee working in telecommunications
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
I really enjoy the flexibility it provides. While I have an expected online time, being at home allows more scheduling options for appointments without concerns for missing meetings or commuting delays.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
I am salaried so whether my day is 8 hours or more I receive the same pay.
4. What is the earning potential of your work?
Earning potential in the telecommunication industry varies based on job skills. I started in customer care and have advanced to Managing a team of product development managers. I feel it is always great to understand how to support customers and learn about the company you work for. This baseline understanding will help you grow with the company you choose.
5. Do you enjoy it?
I LOVE MY JOB! I have enjoyed learning and growing with each position I have held, it is never the same day and there are challenges around every corner.
0
0
Updated Translate

Jaya kishan’s Answer

Remote work is for self-sufficient and independent workers

Remote workers feel empowered more often than in-office workers because they:
Create and stick to their own schedule and get their work done without constant supervision.
Have the discipline to ignore distractions without being told to get back to work.
Make decisions alone since they’re working on their own, in possibly a different time zone where they can’t ask anyone questions.
0
0
Updated Translate

Joshua’s Answer

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
Full-time

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
Yes and no. You can flex your time as needed but usually are always expected to be available.

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
70% base & 30% commission split.

4. What is the earning potential of your work?
Relatively high, although I work in business-to-business sales within the technology industry, so that is mostly normal in this field.

5. Do you enjoy it?
Absolutely! I love working from home. I do miss the water-cooler chat, no doubt about it, but I'm often more productive and spend less time on unimportant things like commuting or distractions in the office.
0
0
Updated Translate

Shiri’s Answer

Paajcha,

I work for Verizon in the Leadership Development Program. It's a 3.5 year program where I rotate through various positions for a year each, and it is a salaried position. It gives me advancement position because the whole purpose of the program is to develop leaders for the company. Because I started in 2020, I was never relocated, and instead work remotely. I'm not sure about the flexibility of work hours on site, since I have neverworked in the office. What I like about remote working is not having a commute. It allows me to stay close to family and friends instead of having to relocate to another state. And I spend less money on gas, and on food by not buying lunch during work.
0
0
Updated Translate

Luis’s Answer

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
- Employee and I work in Human Resources.
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
- A little more, you save time on commute time which allows you to use that time for other things such as working out, making coffee, etc. Biggest issue would be being able to know when to stop working and when to rest since now your work area is also your living area.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
Salary
4. What is the earning potential of your work?
It is the same as if you were in an office.
5. Do you enjoy it?
I love it, you have more time to spend time with your family during breaks, etc.
0
0
Updated Translate

Marini’s Answer

I am a full-time employee. Prior to COVID, I worked from home 3 days per week. Since COVID, I have worked from 5 days per week.

In my particular position, the hours were flexible onsite and remote. We're asked to start work between 7am and 9am, and work our 8 hour shift from that point. I actually find myself more productive at home than onsite because there are less distractions.

I am salaried, but there are hourly workers in my company that work remote. The earning potential is based on your position, experience, and department.

I enjoy what I do because I get to help people. I do not work with customers directly, but a lot of the work my team does impact our company's customers from behind the scenes. I also get to help my employees grow in their careers, to help them help our customers and our company. I look forward to growing with my company and taking on more responsibilities.
0
0
Updated Translate

Naomi’s Answer

Before the pandemic, I worked from home three days a week so going to five days didn't take long to adjust to. I do miss seeing people in person and when our office opens up, I could see going in periodically to see people and catch up.

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
Full time employee working in technology

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
I work the same hours I did when I was in a physical office

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
Pay structure didn't change when going remote. I remained salary.

4. What is the earning potential of your work?
Really good. Each pay level has a large range to ensure people are compensated appropriately based upon experience/performance, etc.

5. Do you enjoy it?
I do enjoy it. I enjoy not having a commute and having my dogs be my office mates. Although they sleep most of the day, they also give me a reason to get up and move during the day (quick walks/outside trips).

One of the things you have to be aware of is that you will now be working where you live. This means that sometimes you'll spend more time trying to finish something up because you don't have a commute. You will need to set boundaries with yourself such as still logging off a certain time, stepping away for lunch, not checking email after a certain time. This will allow you to be present at home with your family and friends.
0
0
Updated Translate

Sahil’s Answer

Hello,

I wanted to give my experience as someone who graduated college in December 2020 and had 1 Internship fully remote as well as being part of 2 full time jobs being completely remote in the techsales space. Working remote definitely comes with its pros and cons, the largest for me being all the time saved working from home that you can allocate in other areas as well as the con of not being around people in person and having a mental zoom fog from the meetings. Being in the sales space, working in person is a really undervalued trait since you learn so much by collaborating with your peers and colleagues on a daily basis. I have had to find ways to overcome that like using Slack huddle calls and various informal chats to discuss and still be as transparent as I can be. Whatever industry you are in, learning to adapt is a very vital trait that has helped me! For context, I am a BDR at a tech company in the sales space - based off base salary and commission earned. The hours are flexible and yes I truly enjoy my job!
Hope this helps, good luck!
0
0
Updated Translate

Joseph’s Answer

My role often requires me to be on site working with equipment, but a significant proportion is desk-based - analysis, reporting, and that sort of thing. For those tasks, my employer is fairly flexible and supportive of hybrid working, so I will often do the desk-based part of my job remotely.

In terms of work hours, we do have a degree of flexibility with on-site hours, but often the nature of remote work means we can be more flexible beyond those hours. We're still expected to be contactable during the core hours, but if I take some time out during the day and make up the time in the evening, that tends to be fine.

With regards to remuneration, it's salaried work, with fairly average pay - I'm probably a little underpaid compared to other similarly specialist industries, but it's not the worst. It's certainly something I chose because I enjoy it rather than for the pay. Comparing with similar roles in other companies that perhaps don't have remote working, I don't think we're particularly losing out on pay for the privilege of having hybrid work flexibility though.
0
0
Updated Translate

Ulysses’s Answer

1. Employee for Telecommunications company doing finance.
2. The hours are very flexible, as the role is not necessarily contingent on being on at certain times of the day but more of just having your work completed.
3. Compensation is salary which helped with the flexibility of the time worked.
4. Earning potential is based on the salary that is negotiated along with the potential bonus compensation that is tied to the performance of the company.
5. I love being a remote worker. I currently work from home and the flexibility and work life balance is very beneficial. I have been a remote worker working on different sites before and the ability to have a new work environment definitely keeps the job interesting. The downside to being a remote worker though is it can be time consuming as the travel time going from the different sites can eat away into your work life balance and keep you away at large intervals of time from being home.
0
0
Updated Translate

Patrick’s Answer

Having worked a 5 State Territory mostly by myself, worked with Large Groups in an office, Small Groups of Professionals all over the USA and parts of Europe, China, South Africa and adjoining countries, and Corporate retreats, outings, and events for Professionals of all levels, working remotely has its Pro's and Con's . You must be flexible, organized, a true self starter, and willing to work hard all by yourself. If you need camaraderie and office chat, it can be difficult, however you can call your office team mates and still get a little of this as well. team meetings on a BlueJeans or Zoom can resolve some of these issues as well. Sure saves you lost drivetime, gas, parking fees (if applicable) outside Breakfast/Lunch cost, and other stress as well. However being alone can be stressful too. Over all do what you would have done at the office if someone was watching you and you will be very successful . Good Luck
0
0
Updated Translate

Edie’s Answer

Hello: I have worked as both a full time in office employee, a hybrid worker and a remote worker. All have advantages. A flexible hybrid position is ideal in my mind but I know so many people that LOVE remote work and do an excellent job. The flexibility of remote work is amazing. It allows time to introduce exercise into your day, be home when the kids get home from school, let the dog out etc. The key is organization and self-discipline. You have to stay focused on staying dedicated to work. I establish a list of things I want to complete each day and hold myself accountable to them. The other thing about remote work is that it allows you to apply for position across the US without having to relocate. With organization, remote work is a fantastic option. Make sure however, that we have an outlet for human contact. It can be lonely. Best of luck.
0
0
Updated Translate

Allen’s Answer

Great questions! I blended question 2 and 5 together in my response.

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
Fulltime employee working in Emerging Technologies.

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
In 2007, I had the opportunity to work from home for 2 weeks, followed by two weeks on a client site in another state, rinse and repeat. I was a contractor at the time, paid hourly and single. I thought there would be flexibility but the hours of work and personal quickly blurred. I would login before I even brushed my teeth and the next time I'd look at the clock it would be the early afternoon. I did not want to rock the boat with my billing hours, so I'd often work 12+ hour days and bill the client 8 hours. It was almost a relief to be on site, where others would take breaks for coffee, lunch and remind you when it was time to go home. I enjoyed being in an office vs. working from home, I felt like I had a better work/life balance.

Fast forward to 2020 now married with 3 young kids. I was working in an office call it 8am - 5pm M-F, then Covid hit. Our team became 100% remote. Now being a salaried employee (and using my lessons learned from 2007), I TRY my best to treat working from home like working from the office. Before I even check my mobile (though I often break this rule and check my work phone for emails before I get up) I brush my teeth, workout, give kids breakfast, etc.. and then 'go to work'. It did take some time for my team to adjust since some folks were working from home for the first time and began to schedule 5pm meetings (because hey, no one is commuting) but after about 6 months, folks understood that working from home does not equate working extra hours you would have spent commuting. On that topic, my prior commute was at least an hour each way, meaning I was not able to help my wife with the kids in the morning and often I had to work late missing dinner time and helping my wife put the kids to bed. I am really enjoying the work/life balance and spending time with my family that was lost in transit. My answer is not quite exact on 'flexibility' but the lack of commute really gives back valuable time my family needs + saves on gas/tolls/wear & tear on vehicle. I'd like to think that's helping the environment!

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) - Salary

4. What is the earning potential of your work? - I'll answer this question in a different way since earning potential is usually tied to how quickly you can climb the corporate ladder which is tied to not only what you know (your core skills) but alaso who you know (your network and brand). In 2008 when I entered the world of consulting, we would be on a client site M-TH with the option to work from home Friday or go into the local office. After flying home late Thursdays with a suitcase full of dirty clothes that needed to be dry cleaned for the following week's travels, the last thing I wanted to do was to wake up and go into an office. I was told several times that I should do this for 'facetime with leaders' to 'advance my career' and was almost shamed for the times I did not show up. The good news is that this is 2022 and I think the 'facetime to advance your career' may be more of a myth. I've seen several folks during Covid get promoted, find new leadership positions externally, etc.. The ease and enablement of virtual meetings means YOU can build your brand without needing the 5 day a week physical facetime with folks (though don't get me wrong, there is value in some facetime). I do think going forward, many companies will adopt the hybrid working model (some home, some office) making a goldilocks scenario for folks who had to choose between office or remote. 2007 me is probably cringing at this statement but I put high value in the ability to choose to work from home, the office or both.

I had a great time responding to your questions, I do not think we take enough time to reflect on the pros/cons of being remote. Best of luck in your career journey!
0
0
Updated Translate

Nathan’s Answer

I work in revenue operations remotely and it is for sure flexible in hours compared to working on site but I do work my normal hours I would work in the office because that is what I am used to doing. I feel more relaxed working remote and actually more productive.
0
0
Updated Translate

Anup’s Answer

Hello - I work in a healthcare industry as a Supervisor/Data Analyst. I am currently working for a company for Michigan from California. Worst part of the time difference is having to get up early and prepare for the work day. We went fully remote after COVID and it took a while to get used to working fully remote but now I would say I've gotten used to it. One significant change is the extra time that I now have since I don't need to get ready and commute anymore. However, I would say there are cons as well. I do miss going to the office and socializing with co-workers. Other con is finding it hard to disassociate yourself with work. Previously, after leaving office, I felt like my work was done but it doesn't feel the same while working remotely.

Thanks,
Anup
0
0
Updated Translate

Vidya’s Answer

Remote work has its pros and cons- I am an employee at an MNC with team members across the world. In that sense remote work has allowed me to get into meetings at fairly odd hours without the worry of getting to a physical office location. However, it has also invaded my evening time.

For the most part, remote work has added a lot of flexibility to my life and hasn't changed much in terms of compensation and other factors. All of this of course depends on the kind of job you do, the company you work for, among other things.
0
0
Updated Translate

Scott’s Answer

1. Big4 Consulting
2. Work hours generally remain the same but sometimes I feel like I work more because I spend most of my time at home
3. Salary and Annual Bonus
4. Limited compared to industry due to the lack of equity in big4...however that changes if you make Partner
5. A majority of the time, yes. Time saved not having to commute is amazing. However, I do miss the social interaction at the office. Being in-person is a major advantage for networking and establishing relationships. I am comfortable working from home because I have been with my current employer for almost 10 years. If I started with a new company, I would prefer to be in office a couple days a week.
0
0
Updated Translate

Mairon’s Answer

1. I'm a full time employee working as a Product Manager for a Technology company.
2. For my routine, with two kids at home during mornings, it is a much more flexible option as I can plan my day to take care of both professional and personal activities in a much better way.
3. I have the same compensation as an on site employee.
4. Technology industry requires multiple skills, not only technical ones.
5. I do enjoy what I do in my current career and remote position.
0
0
Updated Translate

Hang’s Answer

Hi Julie,

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
A. I'm currently working as a full time software engineer
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site?
A. The hours are generally more flexible but have to work with teams across the world. It's important to establish core working hours with your team, it helps you and the team to feel stay connected.
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
A. Salary
4. What is the earning potential of your work?
A. Software development has a pretty big range depending on the company you are working with, websites such as glassdoor can serve as a good reference.
5. Do you enjoy it?
A. I really do enjoy my job. For software developers, we also need to spend a lot of time studying ever-changing technologies. It's important to enjoy and continuous be interested.

0
0
Updated Translate

Anastasia’s Answer

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) I am a full-time management employee

2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? Yes, more flexible in my experience. My work was previously 9-5 in the office, but now there is more flexibility around mid-day appointments. On the flip-side, I feel less stressed about working earlier/later hours because I don't have to worry about a commute. There is much more acknowledgement that the goal is to get the work done rather than having to be sitting at a desk for certain number of hours each week, which feels healthier to me, but it does mean that you have to take the initiative to seek out more work/challenges if you are flying through things because that's not always going to be as obvious to your manager in a remote environment

3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) Salary

4. What is the earning potential of your work? No change in compensation

5. Do you enjoy it? I do. My down-time feels so much more productive because I'm able to take care of the house or do quick workout rather than just surfing the internet or chatting with co-workers. However, keeping a good relationship with co-workers is something to actively address, especially if you are interacting with new team members
0
0
Updated Translate

Tariq’s Answer

Hello, Paachja!

Working from home has its pro and cons that are based on the individual. I find that pros to be greater, but there are some secondary effects of working from home that you should be aware of. As a leader for a Fortune 15 company, we've seen increases in mental health concerns, domestic disruptions, and work avoidance. On the positive side, employee experience has improved due to no commute, minimal dress code, savings on gas and food. There are many other impacts of WFH that I would recommend you continue researching.

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.)
- I work in the communications industry as a leader for a sales and customer service organization. My team consists of around 480 employees that including individual contributors and leaders at different levels.
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on-site?
- I find the hours to be the same in terms of an actual schedule. One obstacle that some employees face is working extensive hours. The WFH space can make it difficult to separate the work environment from your personal environment. Some people have a hard time "leaving the office" and/or cutting off the laptop. TIPS: 1.) Create working hours and stick to them 2.) Do not take your laptop into rooms in your home that are not your regular workspace 3.) Make sure you have a designated workspace in your home
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.)
- I am compensated by salary plus bonuses and stock distributions
4. What is the earning potential of your work?
- My organization offers industry-leading compensation packages. We get Base Pay Increases (BPI) yearly that are around 3% on average. BPI's can be higher or lower based on end-of-year ratings.
5. Do you enjoy it?
- I LOVE WHAT I DO! Specifically, leading, serving, and coaching others is what fulfills me. I get to do this daily in my role. I've also been with my organization for 15 years.
0
0
Updated Translate

Krista’s Answer

1. What kind of work do you do? (contractor, employee, etc.) Employee
2. In regards to work hours, is it more flexible compared to working on site? Yes
3. How are you compensated? (salary, commission, etc.) Salary
4. What is the earning potential of your work? Very good
5. Do you enjoy it? Yes

I'm in a hybrid situation so I've been able to enjoy the benefits of in-person networking and remote flexibility. Find a work situation which fits your lifestyle and career pathway.
0
0
Updated Translate

Gene’s Answer

Hi Julie,

I work in the Property & Casualty Insurance industry, so think about insurance for cars, homes, businesses, people (workers compensation). I don't work from home on a regular basis, but most of my team does and has for a long time (even before Covid).

The insurance industry is very broad and encompasses many disciplines you might be considering; underwriting, claims, actuarial science, predictive modeling, finance/investment, marketing, sales, legal, etc. Most people that work for insurance companies are salaried, and the work hours are generally Monday through Friday... 8-5. There is more focus on getting the work done vs. working strictly during those hours, so there's generally good flexibility in schedules, particularly depending on what you do (and who your 'customer' is).

For example, my career started as a commercial underwriter, which means I evaluate businesses for their insurance needs and determine what insurance to offer them and at what price. In this role your availability is fairly tightly tied to normal business hours Monday - Friday because you're engaging with others outside the company and need to be available when they are. Other roles can be more project driven in nature (such as an actuary or predictive modeling), where you aren't as tied to normal business hours, so there might be greater flexibility.

Insurance has significant earning potential, both on the insurance company side where I work, or on the sales side such as an insurance agent (their compensation will generally be commission driven, so the more you sell the more you make). Within the company side where I am, there are lots of career growth opportunities to move into roles of greater responsibility and leadership that increase compensation. There are also specialized areas (such as an actuary or attorney) within the industry that have good earning potential due to the advanced educational requirements (this is true outside of insurance as well).

And to your last question, I do enjoy it! Ultimately insurance is about taking care of people when something's gone wrong (car accident, house fire, employee got injured at work, etc.), so every role plays a part in delivering that promise. As an underwriter, I get to work with insurance agents for sales and negotiation, learn a lot about all different kinds of businesses, work with actuaries to understand pricing and profitability, work with attorneys to understand contract language, claims adjusters as they work directly with the business owner or injured worker to get things back on track.

Hopefully this opens up another possible avenue for you to consider, and regardless of what you think you want to do, insurance can likely provide avenues for you to consider. Perhaps a good starting place is to go to work for a local insurance agency where you live and get a sense for the many directions you can go.

Good luck!

Gene
0
0
Updated Translate

dave’s Answer

I LOVE working from home and have been doing it for about 15 years

It offers great independence and flexibility

I hope that you are good at time management as that is key!

good luck
0
0
Updated Translate

Ruquayyah’s Answer


Hello, I have worked remotely for just over 3 years as an Executive Assistant in both the insurance and IT industries. It is a very flexible as most remote employers allow you to work at your own discretion with certain timeframes. I am a salaried employee and depending on the position and the company the compensation varies. Your earning potential is similar as if you would work in the office but with less expenses (travel, gas, lunches, etc) you could end up with the potential to save more. I really enjoy working remotely and hope that more people get the option to experience it.
0
0
Updated Translate

Kate Sowinski’s Answer

Hi Julie,

Having previously worked in an office environment for 8 years, I am now hitting my 2 year mark from working from home. We will be returning to the office a few times a month in the April 2022 timeframe.

I am a full time employee who is in the digital marketing department of a technology company. Due to the nature of my job, I collaborate with individuals across the United States. There is very little difference between taking a phone call from an office desk vs. my home desk, but I miss the comradery of peers and leaders.

When we initially transitioned from the office to working from home, I ended up working more hours. Given that we did not need to commute, teams would schedule early and later meetings. As many other responses stated, there is no one advising you when to start/leave. It takes discipline to know when to walk away for the day, even if your home life is only a couple of meet away from your desk. That is something I struggled with for several months, but adjusted to overtime.

Compensation wise, I am a salaried employee. My company provided equipment (ex: standing desk) so we could be as comfortable as possible. I did see cost savings by not having to pay for gas or the regular morning coffee.

Potential earning of work is contingent upon multiple factors, including years of experience, job title and skillset required.

I enjoy my job today because I am part of an organization that is defining 'real time marketing' for our company. It is a forward thinking approach that has required me to develop more a more strategic skillset, which is important as you climb up the ladder.

Hope this helps!
0
0
Updated Translate

Gerald’s Answer


What's being working remote like?
Hi! Working remote has be fun. There are many advantages working remotely.
For starters, working remote offers a nice work life balance which is good for you and the company you work for. That allows you to be more productive.
Another great thing is, there is no need commute. That commute can now be used more efficiently and you're no longer exhausted at the end of the week from all your commutes.
You also save money is so many different ways plus you tend to work a little more and provide more and better results remotely since you're not thinking about your commute etc..