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In college, can you request courses outside your major that are of interest to you?

I want to be a journalist in the future, but I plan to get a history degree. In my case, would it be possible to request journalism courses/classes?

Thank you comment icon Hi Karolina, In college you will have plenty of options and freedom to choose whatever fits you better. However, it will be of your best interest to focus on an end game goal. A must have class would would be finances.. It's crucial for anyone to know the tips and tricks about how to manage money and start building yourself up. I was a stem major but still took a lot of outside classes which somehow fitted my role at the time and helped guided me into who I am today. Social and psychological studies if there is time and space would be a great start up, and please do not forget to add some hobbies like theater, cooking class, painting, or something that gives your pleasure and keeps you motivated. College can be draining sometimes but take it easy. If I could make it so can you 😀. Fatiana Gonçalves
Thank you comment icon College is a really good opportunity to discover what you do and don't want to do. Depending on the college you go to there will be lots of opportunities to do journalism classes. You can also take journalism classes as an elective to get college credit while learning about something you love. If the classes become too much to handle while you are pursuing your history degree, you can alway take classes at a community college over the summer for journalism. That option is cheaper and allows you to focus on one thing at a time. Something that might be a good idea is joining a specific club that specializes in journalism at your school. The advisors and people in the club might be able to direct you into real life opportunities to get more experience with it. Mia M.
Thank you comment icon Hi Karolina, regarding all the courses you could take to start introducing yourself to journalism, I would advice that you develop a genuine curiosity for reading on different topics, from environment reports to travel guides. Why reading everything? because journalism is very broad and reading on different topics would give you an idea of what you like to investigate and report about. Furthermore, start studying languages and different cultures behavior, as a journalist you will have to develop empathy and probably travel a lot. Blessings, Bertha Mariana Silva Leon
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Subject: Career question for you

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Gabriel’s Answer

That is a brilliant question! And Connor's answer was equally brilliant - and accurate. I only offer a couple extra points because I work in financial aid - and...well, we don't get a lot of glory on campus. But...19 years under my belt. Please know that I'm sincere...

Electives are the easiest way to go. But you may wish to look at the possibility of a minor. Those classes usually can get wrapped up into your degree. But whatever you do - be they electives or one-off classes...check with your financial aid office to see if they are covered. Not all classes on the side are. I don't like surprises...don't know many folks who do.

Whatever direction you go...and please take with a grain of salt...when you start college...don't stop. I took a semester off and...it lasted 9 years. I left because I didn't know "what I wanted to do". I was married to the idea that my college degree was going to define my future career. It wasn't until after that someone from the school told me - and here's the grain of salt bit...you go to college to learn how to learn, not to learn a career. (full-disclosure...trade schools are a different lot...but worthy and valid.)

Just...be strong going in...and get that degree...you got this!
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Lindsay’s Answer

Hello Karolina!

I am echoing many others' sentiments but yes - you absolutely can take classes outside of your major while in college! There are many opportunities for electives. I agree that you should check with the financial aid office and your academic advisor to make sure these additional classes would not impede your graduation or major courses, but most colleges you generally have that additional freedom.

Also, if you would prefer to not be in journalism classes, some universities have open organizations like newspapers or clubs that are open to all majors. You may just need to apply to them, but it would provide you an outlet at college to work on journalism but not have to overexert yourself adding more classes to your schedule.

I hope this helps!
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Connor’s Answer

Hello Karolina!

I also shared this question when I first started pursuing my college degree! When first setting up my degree plan I figured there would be a stringent protocol for exactly what I needed to take. This was not the case. What you will find is there will be plenty of freedom for you in choosing classes that interest you. I found out that not only can you take classes outside your major and minor, but you should! College is truly a unique opportunity to interact with and learn from a plethora of subject matter experts on your quest to make the most out of your learning experiences. For most degrees you will be required to take a number of "elective" courses which will allow you to find a subject that best suits your current and future plans.

Best of luck in all of your endeavors!
-Connor
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RAVI’s Answer

Yes. Absolutely. For majoring in any field, there is a required number of courses that you need to take within the core curriculum and major field. The rest of the courses are your choice. Many use that to do a minor in some field of interest or people use it to learn about different things that interest them and fits their schedules some times. You do have a fair bit of freedom to do other things.

It is best to keep the course selected help you towards the end plan. Advisors/councilors in the college will be able to guide you further. You will have plenty of time to learn all these after you enter the college as the first two semesters are focused on the core curriculum.
Best wishes.!
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