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What can make a resume Interesting or Impressive to become a Psychiatrist?

What can I do to impress my Psychiatrist interviewer with my resume?

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Desiree’s Answer

I cannot answer specifically for Psychiatrist; however, I've done a lot of interviews. Here's my general advice (presuming you can keep the resume to 1 page in your first 3 years of professional experience, and up to 2 pages thereafter):

First - be honest. Don't add "fluff" to your resume hoping to impress.

Second -- do find a way to highlight your accomplishments/successes. Avoid simply re-writing your former job descriptions , but instead focus on the specifics of what you actual DID in the role! If you can include details (without exposing any confidential information), all the better --"oversaw operations at 4 tri-state locations", "managed a team of 3 professionals", "used peer influence in cross-functional project for better patient scheduling", "established mentoring program pairing new professionals with more experienced colleagues", etc.

Third -- use jargon. Each profession has its own "language" and you want to ensure that you're using it. Many resumes are scanned by software programs for key words, so know and use them in your resume. Ideally, you'd read the job description carefully and pull the key phrases and words from that into your resume. (Yes, it takes time to customize each resume to each job description. ) Depending on the employer, you may need to make it thru the artificial intelligence software processing resumes before you'll get to a human, so you have to play the game...

Fourth -- don't dwell on the mundane. Yes, we all had to make copies at some point in our career. But that's not a skill that speaks to your professional expertise or unique qualifications so skip statements like "made copies of the quarterly report for senior executives". Your ability to stand next to a copier probably won't be a deciding factor in your next role. Now, if you WROTE sections of the quarterly report, then definitely add that - as that speaks to a material skill set!

Fifth -- Think broadly about what reflects your skills beyond just your current / last job. Are you a volunteer fireman? Do you co-ordinate an alumni event every year? Did you tutor your school-aged cousins in something during COVID? In your "personal" non-professional activities you may exhibit important skills - performance under stressful situations, project management, mentoring/coaching, etc. Add them to your resume! Also, these sorts of things make you stand out as a person.

Sixth -- list your speaking and publications. This may be a short list early in your career, but it will grow. If you've done any speaking (in academia, at professional conferences, to local community groups, as expert on local TV news, whatever - think broadly!) consider adding it. Similarly with publications -- academic journals, professional website sites/blogs, client newsletters, newspaper articles/op-ed.

Seventh -- If room allows, add skills/interests (even those that may seem irrelevant if they're interesting). Speak another language? Can you code?? Definitely add those (literally MAKE room to include those!). But also -- do you scuba dive?? are you training your dog to be a hospital service dog?? working to visit all 50 states?? All pretty random, but may help start conversations and will make your resume stand out.

Desiree recommends the following next steps:

Don't lie but DO emphasis your accomplishments
USE the jargon and "buzz words" from the job description in your resume
Skip anything that doesn't show skill/accomplishment/leadership, but DO think outside your last job for areas in your life where you exhibit such traits!
INCLUDE speaking/publications
INCLUDE skills/interests/activities that make you stand out from the crowd.
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Sami’s Answer

To be a psychiatrist, you have to have a college undergraduate, degree, then graduate from a 4-year accredited medical school, and then complete a 4-year psychiatric residency program. Given this exceptional and difficult level of training, a psychiatrist usually presents a "CV" (Curriculum Vitae) and not a resume to a prospective employer. Graduating from a highly-rate psychiatric residency program and listing this on your CV, will greatly help in securing the best psychiatric jobs.
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