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How should i prepare for becoming a registered nurse?

i am currently studying to get a certification to starting to become a regsitred nurse and would like to know more information

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Liz’s Answer

Hi Kayla,

It is nice to hear that you are an inspiring RN. Great choice :)

Before I begin to answer this question, may I ask how far along you are in your journey?

Liz A.
Thank you comment icon Hi Liz, Thank you for answering. Right now i am in a program to start off by getting technical training & certifications in rehabilitation Kayla
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Liz’s Answer

Hi Kayla-
Big Congratulations on getting into a program.

SO there are a few things that come to mind:

Join a SMALL support/study group-this is essential to not only study but to have others whom understand the current struggles of the program.

2nd- Ask someone you know - a Registered Nurse if they can be your mentor? Even if it is during off time from school.

3rd-Organize your notes, and learn one concept at a time. Once that concept is learned and understood move to the next part of your studies.

Lastly, my method of studying was my savior….I used a big huge white board and acted like I was teaching the concept to my family. Also one more side note: before a test, write all the hardest things down on a paper, then begin the test. Brain dump! Keep your mind clear.

I hope this helps some :)
Best of Luck and Let me know if I can help out in any way

LA (Liz Anderson)
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much i will keep your advice in mind:) Kayla
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Kathy’s Answer

Good morning Kayla,
Liz's advice is excellent. I would add the advice to learn what you are taught when you are taught it. Do not say to yourself, "I'll learn this later" because you are building a foundation of knowledge on which all future instruction will be based. You will not have time in the future to go back and learn what you did not understand or skipped over and your future instructors will build their course content on what they expect you to already know. If you skip over information you were expected to learn, holes start to develop in your knowledge and they only get bigger with time. Your choices when you graduate (if you graduate) become limited to only what you think you have learned enough to do.
I would also suggest, as odd as this sounds, to learn what your school considers cheating. What I mean by this is that many students cheat (knowingly or unknowingly) and can be flunked out of a course or the program. Here are two common examples: A student will cut and paste information found on the Internet into his/her paper without crediting the source (Most institutions consider this plagiarism). Another example is that a student's scholarship/grant/loan is based on the student getting a certain GPA and the student is so worried about getting a low grade on a test or paper that s/he "just cheats a little bit" to make sure to get a good grade.
What you don't know not only affects your career, it directly affects the health and safety of the patients entrusted into your care so please set your standards for personal integrity high and take the time to learn what you are taught as you proceed through your program.
Best wishes for every success,
Kathy
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Shannon’s Answer

You'll learn more if you actively go out & look for answers. Go to a lot of websites to learn from different sources, for example nursing journals, physician journals, first-person narratives about illness & about working in health care, textbooks... the list is very long. it does take practice to learn how to do this but it will help you a lot in school & in life. instructors want to teach people who show that they are eager to learn. the very best thing you can do is to think of questions while you study. maybe you're studying the respiratory system. so you not only do your assigned anatomy reading, but also find a journal article (or an anatomy fact) about the same subject & ask about it. 'i was reading about this case & i don't understand how/why _____ happens' or something like that. of course you shouldn't be a pest but if you ask this kind of question, you'll get a reputation for being eager to learn. and for being smart.
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