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What programming languages can you work with? Describe your experience with them.

Answer only if you have past computer-programming experience or are currently a computer-programmer

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Jimil’s Answer

Hi! I have worked with c++, python, Javascript, java, php, css, html, and much more. I have worked at a variety of companies doing C++, Python, and Javascript, as I feel they are the highest paying and in the most demand. Python and C++ are mainly used for backend applications and they tend to pay more, so I have focused most of my time on these languages. Every person is different, and trying a few different languages is sometimes what it takes to understand what type of programming work interests you.


Python: Python is a popular, high-level programming language that is widely used for web development, scientific computing, data analysis, artificial intelligence, and more. It is known for its simplicity and readability, making it a great choice for beginners.

JavaScript: JavaScript is a popular programming language that is widely used for web development. It is primarily used to create interactive, dynamic websites and web applications. It is also supported by many popular web browsers.

Java: Java is a popular, object-oriented programming language that is widely used for developing enterprise-level applications and Android mobile apps.

C++ : C++ is a powerful, high-performance programming language that is widely used for developing operating systems, games, and other performance-critical applications.

C#: C# is a modern, object-oriented programming language developed by Microsoft that is widely used for Windows desktop and web applications.

Go: Go is a modern, open-source programming language that is designed to be simple and easy to use. It is particularly well-suited for building web servers and other networked applications.

R: R is a popular programming language that is widely used for statistical analysis, data visualization, and machine learning.

SQL : SQL is the standard language for managing relational databases. Many applications use SQL to insert, update, retrieve and manage data in a database.

These are some examples of popular programming languages, but there are many others out there. Each language has its own strengths and weaknesses, and is more suited for specific types of tasks and applications.
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Fred’s Answer

Fortran, C, Visual Basic, C++, Pascal, Basic, Perl, Java, Python, TCL, shell scripting...possibly more...

Not sure what you mean by "experience with them".

Programming languages are like tools in a tool box. Each is designed to do different things. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses, but that doesn't make one better or worse. A hammer is no better or worse than a pipe wrench, it's just used for a different purpose. There are some tasks where Perl would be my first choice, and others where it would be my last.
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Melissa’s Answer

In college, I learned Fortran, COBOL, Pascal and Assembler. At my job of almost 30 years, I have done COBOL, javascript and C#. It is very true that every programming language has its benefits and some are better fitted for a given task than others. That being said, working in a large corporation, it is typically true that as a member of the development team supporting a given system, you will design/code with the language(s) being used by that system. The most important thing to learn is how to perform analysis and how to approach coding and how to approach unit testing. Once you get experience in working in software development, you can more easily tackle a new-to-you programming language. There will be a learning curve if switching from a language on the mainframe vs a language in the client/server world, for example. Learn how to 'be a carpenter' and you can more easily learn how to use multiple tools. I have enjoyed working on both COBOL/DB2 and C#. Don't shy away from any language, the more you learn, the more you know and the more confident you shall be.
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Arlene’s Answer

Hi Donovan, I have expertise in Java and Javascript. I do have experience in other languages too -- C, C++, Pascal, Shell, Perl, etc. I've been in the tech industry for about 15 years. While I don't code anymore at work (been managing teams for the last 7 years), I still code once in a while outside work. My full stack background allowed me to work on both backend and frontend which I really enjoyed. Gave me tons of flexibility too in terms of the jobs to apply for.

Different programming languages have their own strengths, weaknesses, and purpose.

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