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How do I get a remote job?

I graduated college in December 2021. I want advice on how to get a job without worrying about being perfect. Yes, I am 24 and do not have a driver's license.

Given life's new challenges, I should have opportunities for remote work. I need a good network and tips on how to detect scammers.

Thank you comment icon Hi, Here are some freelance remote and online job opportunities that could be explored: 1. TranscribeMe (Transcription, Translation, Annotation, etc.]) - https://workhub.transcribeme.com/Account/Register 2. Freelance Editor at PaperTrue - https://blog.papertrue.com/hiring-freelance-editors/?_ga=2.103495360.1919610458.1637679794-1277255074.1637679793 3. CACTUS (Academic Editing, Translation, etc.) - https://jobs.cactusglobal.com/jobs 4. Rev Freelance Jobs (Transcriptionist/Captioner) - https://www.rev.com/freelancers 5. DataForce Community - https://www.transperfect.com/dataforce/community 6. Chegg Subject Matter Expert - https://www.cheggindia.com/qa-experts/sign-up/ 7. Smartling Translator - https://www.smartling.com/translator_information/ 8. Appen Part-time Jobs - https://appen.com/join-our-crowd/#part_time Hope this helps. Karina B

+25 Karma if successful
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To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Anna’s Answer

A very good start is Indeed.com and LinkedIn. Two very good websites to search for jobs. Job searching on Craigslist or social media platforms is where you will find a lot of scammers. When you build your profile, build it towards wanting to remote work. After Covid, a lot of large corporations see that working remote has its benefits and are offering it more to employees. When you do get an interview, be upfront with your interviewer and stress the importance of your needs, but also making it seem that it's a benefit for them. Good luck on your job search!
Thank you comment icon Anna, I want to thank you very much for the advice. I had no idea where to start. Now I can move on to the next step of creating a resume. Deja
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Bridget’s Answer

Hi Deja! I definitely agree with others on this thread to start a LinkedIn profile and send out those connection requests. Before that though, I would take some time to think about what sorts of industries/companies/positions you're interested in to calibrate your job search before diving in and getting overwhelmed. Make a list of "Needs" for the role you're looking for (ex. must be fully remote), and think about what is going to be a dealbreaker for you. This will give you something to anchor to throughout the job search and also help you filter jobs out.

Once you feel more centered in your search, use LinkedIn to find people working in similar positions to ones you might be interested in or at companies you might want to work at. Don't be afraid to reach out to people and ask for an informational interview to learn more about what their day-to-day looks like! It'll definitely give you a better idea of what sounds appealing to you and what doesn't.

I would also suggest cross-checking any job listings you find on LinkedIn or Indeed with the company's website. I've found that a lot of times listings are out of date or the position has already been filled, so better to double-check than be disappointed later. Best of luck in your job search, you've got this!
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Erin’s Answer

I work remotely and I love it! However, it has its additional challenges. I agree with Noah's answer that it will be helpful to build your network of connections. Start working on this network early, before you need the job, so that those connections are already there when you need them. Be genuine about who are and what you are looking for. When you are meeting people for the first time, approach it as a good learning opportunity to see what their job and career path has been like, because you may learn some things about what might work and not work for you in the future. Also, if you are able to establish report on a personal level, they will be more likely to think of you when they know someone who is hiring and has a job that fits your skill-set. Also, in general just talk to your friends, family, and anyone you know about how excited you are to be looking for your next career opportunity. You never know who might know who, who is hiring!
Thank you comment icon I’m thankful for your answer Erin, thank you. Maybe talking to some people will help me get an idea for my career. I don’t have a clear plan for what I’m doing so hopefully they can help me as well as everyone here. Deja
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Noah’s Answer

If you don't have much experience, reaching out to recruiters directly or someone else who has power over the hiring process can be more effective. It's even better if you can find people to refer you to others. Basically just try to build connections and provide value without asking for things in return. Finding decent remote work can be tough and in my experience simply applying to jobs like on Linkedin or Indeed has been less effective.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, I appreciate your advice, Noah. I will try to make some connections. Deja
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Gregory’s Answer

If you are a psychologist I would look into companies like Headspace and Ginger to see if they have opportunities for you. Quite a few companies are facilitating remote care type roles.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Gregory I’m very grateful for your advice. I have no idea how to start but I’m hopeful. Deja
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Mike’s Answer

Hi Deja! I would recommend when applying for jobs to keep a Google Sheet/Excel file as a tracker for the positions you applied for, helping track hearing back from recruiters and quick notes.

A lot of the other comments are really great, building a local network, and using LinkedIn and Indeed with the companies job page. If there is a specific type of job or area that you are looking for a job, there might be a job board that matches that; i.e. non-profits, or greater Seattle start ups ("Built In", that has local networking and career events). I've found that if you are able to tailor your resume or cover letter for the specific job, your odds of getting a response and interviews are better. LinkedIn is good, but it's more of a research tool since everyone is on there and applying from the LinkedIn job post.

During the interview process, I would express interest for remote work positions. They will probably ask about your flexibility of travel and coming onsite to the office (how frequently would you want to do that or be entirely remote?), the travel % should be included in the companies job description. Good luck!
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