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How can I build a good career as a software engineer?

With so many programming languages out there, choosing the right one for your domain is vital. This is asked to shed some light on the pros and cons of some of them.

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Purva’s Answer

Often new developers hesitate before picking up a programming language, fearing they’ll waste time and energy learning something they’ll never use. But the truth is, there’s really no such thing as the "right" or “wrong” programming language. Regardless which language you choose, you’ll still be learning valuable skills. Programming languages may seem different on the surface, but they have a lot in common. They share similar patterns and structures, and by learning one language, you’ll be introduced to key coding concepts that’ll help you learn other languages in the future. Once you pick up your first programming language then no matter which you choose, it’ll be easier to pick others up. Plus, it’s common for developers to move between different languages throughout their careers as they’re asked to solve different sorts of problems. You’re definitely not locked into using the first programming language you choose. So don’t worry too much about focusing on whether you’re learning the “best” programming language. Instead, focus on gaining that foundational knowledge with whatever language you choose.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. I am glad to hear that you are interested in programming.
There are different kinds of developer, e.g. Web, Apps, ERP, System, etc. Different applications/platform may use different programming languages and have specific domain knowledge. I recommend you to take the Computer Science course in the college to give an overview before you decide which sector you would like to develop your career.
Having said that, you can start doing programming first. Below are my suggestions:
1. Identify an easy programming language, e.g. Python, Scratch, etc.
2. Learn the language structure and syntax. There are plenty resources online.
3. Start doing some simple programming and can do some small projects, e.g. control a toy car, robots, etc. Practice makes perfect!
4 After you have familiar one programming, you can start learning another one.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Arantza’s Answer

Resources to start exploring different programming languages:
https://www.hackerrank.com/
https://leetcode.com/
w3schools.com

YouTube Channels:
Alex Lee
AmigosCode

Starter Languages:
Java, Python, JavaScript

Start your own portfolio:
GitHub
https://github.com/
-you can showcase all the projects you have worked on
-get experience with git version control
-search other public projects
-add this to your resume and future internship/job applications
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Pooja’s Answer

Depending on your interest/passion in languages you can learn Python, C/C++ or Java. This are helpful when working in Software engineer space. If you would like to be Front end engineer you can learn Python, HTML, javascript.
Hands on experience with coding, participate in lot of coding challenges would give additional advantage.
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David’s Answer

There is no one answer here. Software developers work in websites, servers, production applications, PC software and others. You will want to have some familiarity with many, depending on where you want to be. For example, web developers need strong knowledge of HTM, CSS, javascript, PHP, server administration, some PHP, and other languages. As you begin to discover your area of interest, the languages in which to specialize will become visible. You will get more information on this as you continue studying in a computer science curriculum. All the best to you.
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Olivia’s Answer

Some of the programming languages that are required for Big companies are:
Java with Spring is a good option
JavaScript, react, Mongo Express, Node
.net developer
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Nathan’s Answer

It's less about learning a language and more about learning how to think outside the box and create novel solutions to problems.

Pick a language (any popular language) like others said and make something, a little script, a small program, whatever. You will learn a lot by trial and error. Then rinse and repeat with another language and you will notice patterns in how things are structured. This is especially true in languages that share the same syntax heritage. Most of all have fun learning and don't stop learning. The most successful people are those that don't stop learning and have a growth mindset.
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Vickie’s Answer

Software engineering jobs are very high in demand. The good news is that there are more jobs than talent. To get started in an entry level software engineering job, start with getting any kind of experience you get, whether it's an internship, or you volunteered to build a website for your neighbor's side business, they all count. In addition to what you've learned in the classroom, employers want to see what practical experience you've applied to the real world.
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Andrew’s Answer

I learned Fortran in the late 1980's, and Fortran was already obsolete. But you will find the problem-solving approach to programming is the same in all of the programming languages. The main difference is the commands, and in many cases they are the same or similar to what was used in the 1980's. Develop the discipline of organizing the framework of the approach and solution to project. The programming languages are like a video game, you can learn the basics in a few hours and spend a lifetime picking up new tips. But the objectives are always the same - grind to win!
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Shanin’s Answer

Apart from the programming languages that are vital and mentioned from previous answers, having hands on experience early on is a great way to ignite your career as a SDE! Applying for internships and/or apprenticeships as soon as you can and as many as you can before being able to start working full-time are great starting points. Recruiters and Hiring Managers always look to see if a SDE has had internships after or in conjunction with their schooling/education.
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