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Hcan i get rid of fear in order to develop my career ?

How can I get rid of fear to develop my career?

Thank you comment icon Kemi, First of all, know that fear is natural emotion and it's part of human nature to experience. You are already taking the first step to getting rid of your fear, which recognizing that it is there. The next step is to write down what specifically makes you afraid consider which of these fears pose a real harm and what is the harm. Most of the time, there is no real harm, and if that is the case, you need to place yourself in these uncomfortable experiences that make you afraid, even if it seems impossible or painful. After being exposed, you will realize that fear feels real, but it's not a part of your physical world. Best of luck! Carlos

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Subject: Career question for you

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Kelsey’s Answer

Hi Kemi,

This is a great question, and something I continue to work through myself. What I have found is that fear may never go away, but you can grow and develop to be successful despite your fear. Every day that you keep moving forward, you are that much stronger (and small steps still count!).

I agree with Hannah- it is helpful to first acknowledge: what is it that you’re afraid of? The Unknown can be very scary- give yourself some grace if you are starting a new role, joining a new organization, or doing anything unfamiliar for the first time. And think of each little step toward facing your fear as an investment in yourself- anytime you complete a task that causes anxiety, that’s worth celebrating!

Take your career development at your own pace- there is no “Right way” or “One path” that you need to follow. What worked for someone else may not be a good fit for you, and that is OKAY! Take a deep breath, trust that you are absolutely capable of success, and good luck tackling your fears!
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Jeff’s Answer

Seeing some good advice here so far. Brian's answer will be fairly close to mine. Keep note that people traverse different experiences in life. Those experiences can heavily influence fears, at the same time, experience can remove them. To that point, you should learn to respect that fear. Fear is not bad at all, but if you don't ever face your fears, you won't grow. In terms of a career, it's scary for everyone because "you don't know what you don't know." Take a step forward, try something you haven't before. It could be the first step of many to an amazingly successful career. In my 26 years of working, I have faced fear and uncertainty with each new company, each job role, business I started, business I failed, and so on, but I never quit and embraced what I didn't know. Today, I feel more confident in my capabilities than ever, and I give great credit to my experiences. They wouldn't have happened if I never gave myself the chance. I've been able to learn what I don't like, what I shouldn't do, what's important to my community and most importantly, where I wanted my future to go. Overall, if you don't take a risk and be ok with being uncomfortable, you won't ever be able to reap the rewards of your trials. Its ok to not be successful in everything you do, it's not easy, but in the end, you gain success in the fact that you tried, increased your knowledge, gained new skills and now the second step becomes easier. Take your first step, try something you haven't before and learn from the experience. You have so much opportunity in front of you if you just have faith in your ability to improve over time. Just don't expect to walk into a job knowing everything, instead, expect that you will need to learn it all and focus on being a lifelong learner.

Jeff recommends the following next steps:

Apply for a job that can support you currently (local, works with your availability, etc)
Gain experience in something, you may not like it, you may love it, but give yourself the chance
Take your next step, is it a job in the same company, maybe you want to try something else
Keep growing, take on new UNKNOWN challenges, face new fears - careful, it may become addicting!
Keep in mind, you can always go back through education programs to gain new skills
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Andrew’s Answer

Are you a S.T.A.R. storyteller? There are loads of acronyms out there but the one you need to know to be confident in your ability is to be able to tell your own story (and tell it well). Use the framework below and craft 5-10 stories that highlight your contributions (past and present). Run the stories by friends and peers and then you will be even more confident when you have a career discussion with your employer.

Andrew recommends the following next steps:

S stands for Situation: Write 2 sentences about an event in your life (My car broke down on the way to work...)
T stands for Task: Write 2 sentences about your plan to address (I knew I needed to get to work and let the boss know I will be late)
A stands for Action: Write 2-4 sentences about the action taken (Moved to a safe spot. Called my boss to make him/her aware. Called uber)
R stands for Result: Write 2 sentences about the result (My boss thanked me and appreciated the heads up... I caught up on all of my missed work)
So write 10 of these stories. Rehearse in front of friends and peer. Take their feedback constructively. Then share with employer during a 1 on 1 check-in. Good luck!
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Hannah’s Answer

I think the first step is figuring out what is it that you fear? Is it the fear of rejection? Change?

Before I started my current job, I was scared to leave my previous job for a few reasons. One, I was scared that I would not like my new job. I always had a "what if" in the back of my mind. Two, I was scared of the uncertain. I was comfortable where I was at because I knew what to expect every day coming to work. But I finally realized I was not happy about my old job. I thought about what would make me happy, and what would make the most sense for my future.

Choosing a career is an overwhelming process, and the best advice I can give you is turn your fear into excitement. You will encounter rejection, anxiety, nervousness, but you can overcome that. Think of your career as your next chapter in life.
Thank you comment icon Choosing a career can be overwhelming. It is important to choose a career that you have an interest in. Alpesh Patel
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Ky’s Answer

Hi Kemi,

I think it's great you're asking the question, and I really like the answers I've seen here already.
You've hit a popular topic!

I think there is no really wrong or right way of starting to develop your career, or perhaps a better way
of saying it, is that for me, it was a bit of trial and error to find out what career fit best for me. I've tried a lot
of jobs, until eventually, some of them really clicked for me and I moved towards wherever i succeeded most,
and whatever I enjoyed most.

What caused me hesitation and fear was the lack of control I felt when I wasn't an expert at the job.
But my coworkers were kind, and helped me learn, and every job, whether it turned out to be my
career or not, has still been helpful in my job.

Best wishes and congrats on being honest and asking the hard questions.
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Debra’s Answer

Walk through what is often called "the story in my head". What is the internal narrative? Example: I am afraid of applying for a new job because I might not get selected".... then turn that story into one where a friend is asking you for advice -- so if a friend told you that, what would your advice be to them --- then take your advice for yourself!!! We can often diffuse fear by walking through the possible outcomes and explore how those really impact (or not) our long term goals. Best wishes!
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Louella’s Answer

Fear is normal and this probably won't be the first time you feel this. HOWEVER, use that fear as motivation, remember all you have to gain from this next step you are taking. Even the challenges and or setbacks that you may encounter will be worth it. WHY, because you will learn so much from that. Keep moving and going after what speaks to you. As you maneuver you will learn so much about yourself and see the growth that will help you as you continue in your path. Remember: "YOU CAN DO ANYTHING YOU SET YOUR MIND ON DOING!"
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Andrew’s Answer

Great question. My advice would be to take it one day at a time. Small steps lead to big changes. Start by writing down things that interest you. Speak with the people you know. Research potential careers online. Create a vision board, etc. The more small steps you take the easier the big steps become.

Find ways to volunteer. Look for internship opportunities. Explore. You'll learn new things about yourself and new doors will open for you. Good luck!
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Martina’s Answer

Hi Kemi, First and foremost, you have to know yourself -- and I mean really know yourself. Take the time to analyze your likes and dislikes. Take personality and career quizzes. Research companies you want to work for, check out job boards, update your résumé and create your personal marketing plan. Ask for introductions, and connect with people on LinkedIn who can help. As you’re doing all the career-related stuff, you should be devoting some time to getting prepared to make your move. Once you feel confident that you have a cushion, and possibly a career lined up or waiting in the wings, Go for it!
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Kerwin A’s Answer

Great question. We all fear developing our careers because of fear of failure or imposter syndrome (Afraid folks will find out we are not skilled for our job). It is important to be true to yourself and discover what is causing our fear. Once you determine the cause, you can overcome those fears. Such as I don’t have the skills to do the job, and I need to go back to school, get a certification, or go online to sharpen your skills.
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Yhtiyar’s Answer

Fear is a natural human emotion, and it's common to feel fear when taking risks or pursuing new career opportunities. However, fear can also hold you back from achieving your career goals. Here are some strategies to help you overcome fear and develop your career:

Identify the source of your fear: Understanding the root cause of your fear can help you address it directly. Ask yourself: what specifically am I afraid of? Is it failure, rejection, or the unknown? Once you identify the source of your fear, you can take steps to address it.

Reframe your mindset: Instead of focusing on the negative outcomes that could result from taking a career risk, try to reframe your mindset to focus on the potential positive outcomes. For example, think about the new skills you could learn, the connections you could make, or the personal growth you could experience.

Take small steps: Sometimes, taking small steps towards your career goals can help build your confidence and reduce fear. Set small, achievable goals that will help you make progress towards your larger career goals.

Seek support: It can be helpful to seek support from others who have been through similar experiences or who can provide encouragement and guidance. This could include friends, family members, mentors, or career coaches.

Practice self-care: Taking care of your physical and emotional health can help you feel more confident and reduce fear. Make sure to prioritize self-care activities like exercise, healthy eating, and stress-reducing practices like meditation or yoga.

As a career coach, I can provide personalized guidance and support to help you overcome fear and develop your career. If you're interested in learning more about my career coaching services, please contact me. www.getmydreamjob.us
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Brian’s Answer

Each of my recent college grad children felt this very same way. I think they call it imposter syndrome. It is also leaving the safety and comfort that you didn’t have to handle the details of life. My recommendation is to face it head on. I did it when I was a young person and learned. Bumped into many things. What I do know about fear is that it is all in our head. At times it’s good to listen to it. For instance, a hot item will burn you. That doesn’t mean you can’t touch it or move it. You just have to figure out how to do that without getting burned. So there is fear in being burned but you have To Move it. So you perhaps ask for advice or grab a pot holder since you saw somebody do that. You do it and off you go. You still might get burned but you move on. Plus you might have to figure out how to sooth the burn and move on.

My point, you will always have some kind of fear and you do have to overcome it. You do it by taking steps in little ways and start to trust yourself. We all can do many things with taking action, learning, and trying. Just remember, failure is not getting it wrong it is not trying at all.

Best of luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Brian for the advice. Kemi Christianah
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Aisha’s Answer

Hello Kemi,

Redefine your fear. Recognize that although feelings of fear usually misrepresent , they can be productive by encouraging you to take action to prepare for your job search.

Try to redefine your fears as motivators. Redefine fears you can overcome as opportunities for growth and develop strategies to make progress. For instance, if a major fear of yours is interviewing, ask a friend to help you practice or write out the points you would include when answering possible questions.

Describe your fears in writing. Writing out your fears in a journal or elsewhere can help you identify the primary contributors to your worries. Consider listing your sources of fear, how they make you feel, what they prevent you from doing and practical steps you can take to overcome each one. You may gain several useful insights about your fears.

Practice engaging fear. While being comfortable in your routine can reduce certain stresses, it may make adapting to new circumstances more difficult. Many people have both major fears and smaller ones that only cause mild discomfort, such as trying new foods or meeting new people. Research the opportunities that interest you. You can directly resolve some fears about a future work environment with research.

Seek professional advice. There are various professional resources to assist with the challenges of changing jobs. Develop your skills. A common job change fear is that you would struggle to meet expectations in a new role. Most jobs require learning some new skills or information for success.

Best,
Aisha Taylor
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Betsy’s Answer

It really depends on what your fear is or what you are afraid of. When I was a student, I was afraid of picking the wrong major or choosing the wrong job once I graduated. While there are some majors that are better than others for certain fields of study, I found it very reassuring that a degree of any kind would help me learn and grow and that you can go into fields completely different from your undergraduate major. I was a philosophy major in undergrad, worked in adult education, got an MBA, and now work in technology and human resources. Someone also told me that the first job is definitely not going to be my last. Most people have a variety of jobs throughout their career. That took the pressure off of picking just the right job right after graduation. If you are nervous about interviews, I recommend practicing with friends, teachers, counselors, or other adults. If you are afraid your resume isn't strong enough, think about volunteer or community activities that will help you build other skills. Whatever you are afraid of, there is likely a resource or a community that can support you? Identify your fears, voice your needs and seek out support. You are not alone!
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Diane’s Answer

Hi Kemi - such a great, 1st step in acknowledging your fear! Identify what you are afraid of/what it is you fear, don't run from it and don't make excuses for it. Once you have identified it look back and past experiences you've had where this fear crept in and what steps did you take to overcome it. Talk with folks within your circle (friends, family, co-workers. mentors) and discuss your fear and ask them how they handle fear. Set goals, make a game plan and don't be afraid to fail. We all fail, it's part of growth. Best of luck!
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