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What GPA do I need to get into a good medical school??

What GPA do I need to get into a good premed school? I really am interested in being a neurosurgeon but am unsure what college to go to and how long?

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Michel’s Answer

Great question.

The higher the GPA you have the better your chances, and schools will be important, but will not be a deciding factor. I am currently attending a really good school and a lot of my classmates ended up doing undergrad at Ivy league colleges, UCLA, Stanford, and other really big name schools. I ended up attending a very mediocre school that no one has ever heard of. I was able to distinguish myself against other classmates and that is what is going to be extremely important. To get into medical school I had a 3.99 GPA and i had a 514 MCAT which put me in the top 11 percent of applicants in that cycle. There are a lot of components that go into a medical school applicant. The admissions is looking for MCAT, GPA, extra activities like volunteering, shadowing experience, experience in general, leadership, and personal statement. These all make up your application and depending on what you are strong in can be extremely helpful. So I would shoot for the best GPA that you can, but that wont be the only thing the schools are looking at. Make sure you stay competitive and also do activities that you enjoy so you can talk about them during interview season so you can shine above the other applicants.

I hope this is helpful and I hope you absolutely rock it. Keep up the hard work and I know you will do great things.
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Cuong’s Answer

As you are from the USA, it is understandable that a variety of universities in the nation require at least 3.0 for your field. Moreover, with some top-ranked universities, a 3.8 GPA and above can also be seen as the standard for them to pick. Apart from the GPA, you also need to have extra work outside your school, and earn a certificate that can help you with your CV so you can get a place at some of the universities.
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Sakthi’s Answer

Hello Minuet,
U need to get 3.46 or higher on 4.0 grading scale.but ,most med school has 3.60
Neurosurgeon takes 14 to 16year to complete ur course including pre - med,medical school , internship and residency
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Adrian’s Answer

Excellent question.

The GPA required for admission to a good medical school varies depending on the school, but generally speaking, a strong academic record is important for gaining admission to a competitive medical school program. While there is no specific minimum GPA required for medical school, the average GPA for accepted applicants to top-tier medical schools is typically around 3.7 or higher on a 4.0 scale.

However, it's important to note that medical school admissions committees consider many factors in addition to GPA, such as standardized test scores, clinical and research experience, extracurricular activities, and personal qualities such as leadership and interpersonal skills. A lower GPA can be offset by strong performance in other areas, and some medical schools have a more holistic approach to admissions, which takes into account a wider range of factors beyond academic performance.

In addition, it's worth noting that different medical schools have different admissions criteria, so it's important to research individual programs and their requirements. Some medical schools may have a lower average GPA requirement, while others may require a higher GPA. Ultimately, the best way to improve your chances of being accepted to a good medical school is to strive for academic excellence while also building a strong resume with relevant experience and achievements in other areas.
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Katherine’s Answer

Hello Minuet:

I was accepted to medical school with a 2.8 GPA. I had a 2.5 science GPA during the four years of my undergraduate studies. In medical school, I was a 2.0 student and I passed ALL of my USLMLE I, II, and III examinations throughout medical school; not without difficulty. Did I fail a class or two. YEP. Did I have to repeat the classes? YEP. Did I graduate in 4 yrs? NOPE. I graduated in 5 yrs. But I graduated.

YES, typically the schools want the top academic achievers, but there are ALSO those candidates in the middle or even at the bottom of their undergraduate class, that can get into medical school and succeed.

My undergraduate counselor told me that I would "never get into medical school" with my low GPA. I had others in academia tell me that I would never get into medical school. In spite of their DISCOURGEMENTS, I got into medical school. Medical school was not without a struggle BUT I had tutors and other support to help me along the way.

I applied for a Med/Peds residency, in 1995 which at that time was a very competitive residency. The dean of my medical school informed me that I would never match because the programs were so competitive; the program I listed only accepted 2 people. My medical school class was 108 (approx) and I believe I was 98........I MATCHED!!!! and successfully completed the 4yr RIGOROUS program. I SUCCESSFULLY passed my ABIM (Internal Medicine). I chose not to take my ped boards because I already knew by this time, it would be a waste of money and preparation process, adding nothing to what I wanted to do with the Med/Peds career.

In the end, I do not regret my Med/Peds residency because I have the flexibility to work as a hospitalist, Critical Care, emergency medicine, Urgent Care AND primary care. Getting my peds board certification wasn't going to add more money to my salary, but I appreciated the training and it has helped me with a number of adult diagnoses that were missed when they were younger.

I have been working in Emergency medicine for over 20yrs, I have NEVER been sued or sanctioned. I know how to treat pediatrics and have maintained my educational CMEs for peds as well.

During the covid pandemic, I worked on several critical care projects, worked as a hospitalist, and worked in the ER.

I'm not going to lie and say that passing the USMLE and my ABIM was easy. I had to take my USLME I, II, and III, each twice before I finally passed. But I passed.

My initial, ABIM, I had to take 3 times before I finally passed. But I passed.
I have recertified again for my ABIM passing in 2019 after failing twice before. But I passed.

For my standardized tests, I enrolled in a variety of "study technique" programs. I don't know if those exact programs are still in existence today. I enrolled in board review courses. When I graduated from medical school in 1996, we were still testing on paper. Paper testing for boards etc...

So when everyone switched to computer-based testing, that was intimidating for me. I enrolled in a program to teach me how to do test taking on the computer and not on paper.

I persevered and was determined to prove everyone who told me "I couldn't" or "I wouldn't ...." be a doctor. They were wrong.

I had to apply to medical school 5 times before I was finally accepted AND I was awarded the Dean's scholarship. I don't remember my MCAT scores but they were not impressive. Every time I applied to medical school, I was told that my statement was very impressive. Additionally, I always interviewed well. One question that I would ask at my interview was "What can you tell me that I need to do, that would prove to you that I will make it as a doctor?" there were a variety of answers. "Do research". "Get a Master's in Public Health" "Get a Master's Degree in.... to prove you can handle the volume of work..."

I did not get a Master's degree in anything. I did some research on getting into medical school. Medical schools have to fill their classes. Yes they want the top candidates but I found out, ---- during my times of application------- the average GPA for many medical school applicants one year maybe 3.8, or 3.5, etc... or even 3.2.........????
however, what if one year a particular school's average GPA for their applicants was only 3.2? and that particular school didn't have enough applicants to fill their class........then the applicant with a GPA of 2.8, along with an excellent written statement----- gets invited for an interview
and the interview is deemed "impressive" that applicant gets selected for medical school. BINGO!!! I'm in. "Accepted with contingencies"

That particular year that I was accepted (I think), the applicants (GPA) to medical school had taken a dip, and the numbers were low, and I was accepted to 3 medical schools, after interviewing at 5.

What do you call the medical student who graduates last in their class? A doctor
Persistence, tenacity, determination, and creativity. That's me in a nutshell.
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