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psychologist

What has been the hardest and best part of becoming a psychologist.

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Ivanova’s Answer

Hi Valeria,

I am an Industrial and Organizational Psychologist and currently work as an "HR Consultant". Basically, I am the person that team members in the company can trust with sensitive, complex, and confidential matters, and the person that listens to them, identifies the key issues, guides them to finding solutions, and provides them with the available resources that the company offers. The matters that I look into are either related to a team member's work environment, relationships with managers and co-workers, or even personal such as anxiety, depression, and/or burnout.

1) To me, the hardest part of developing as an Industrial and Organizational Psychologist was being able to find a "meaningful" job in the market. Before my current role, I worked as an activity leader in an after-school program, as an IT recruiter, and as a Learning & Development support specialist. I came to the realization that I wanted to do something more "meaningful" when I worked as a recruiter because I knew that I wasn't doing something that I enjoyed. During this time, I even questioned myself if I should've chosen a degree in technology/computer science, or maybe if I should've gone for a degree in Clinical Psychology… And then I understood that we all have different life perspectives.

What "meaningful" means to me is very different from what it means to everybody else. To me, "meaningful" means creating an impact on other people's well-being; inspiring change in terms of mental and emotional health; being seen as a mediator, and as the person that will listen to you when you are experiencing a difficult situation. And once I was able to determine what I wanted, and what "meaningful" is to me, I stopped questioning myself.

I do want to point out that there is absolutely nothing wrong with recruiting; I actually know a number of psychologists that developed their careers in recruiting and they are happy, accomplished, and well-paid. But in my case, I knew that another role in the corporate world would make me feel achieved. Today, I can tell you that working as an "HR Consultant" is only the start of a great career ahead. I know my skills, I know what I am good at, and where I want to go. It's all easy now.

2) The best of being a psychologist is that I have become the person that I always wanted to be. I am the person that people go to for advice (in both my work and in my personal life); I don't judge people; I influence others into becoming more inclusive and eliminating the stigma of mental illnesses; I teach people how to think outside the box; I know how to choose my words and ask questions; I am a mediator; I can handle difficult conversations; and I am a wellness advocate.

And if you're wondering, yes, it can get overwhelming sometimes to listen to other people's problems over and over, but that is another beautiful thing that being a psychologist has given me; I have my own methods and techniques to maintain a healthy state of mind.
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Daria’s Answer

The hardest part of becoming a psychologist can vary depending on the individual's personal experiences and circumstances, but some common challenges include:

1. Education and training: Becoming a psychologist requires extensive education and training, which can be challenging and time-consuming.

2. Dealing with emotional and challenging situations: Psychologists often work with clients who are dealing with emotional or challenging situations, such as trauma, mental illness, or relationship issues. This can be emotionally taxing and require a high level of empathy and resilience.

3. Navigating ethical dilemmas: Psychologists must navigate ethical dilemmas, such as maintaining confidentiality, avoiding dual relationships, and ensuring that their interventions are evidence-based and effective.

4. Building a practice or career: Starting a practice or building a career as a psychologist can be challenging, requiring marketing skills, networking, and business acumen.

The best part of becoming a psychologist can also vary depending on the individual's personal experiences and circumstances, but some common rewards include:

1. Helping others: Psychologists have the opportunity to make a significant positive impact on the lives of their clients, helping them to overcome challenges, build resilience, and improve their mental health.

2. Intellectual challenge: Psychology is a complex and fascinating field, providing intellectual challenge and opportunities for lifelong learning and growth.

3. Meaningful work: Many psychologists find their work to be deeply meaningful, as they are able to help others and make a positive difference in the world.

4. Flexibility and autonomy: Psychologists often have the flexibility and autonomy to set their own schedules, work with a variety of clients, and pursue their own research interests.

Overall, becoming a psychologist can be a challenging but rewarding journey, providing opportunities for personal growth, intellectual challenge, and meaningful work.
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Kyle’s Answer

Hello Valeria!

Psychology is an incredibly vast and fascinating field, and the most challenging part for me was figuring out which particular area I was most passionate about! Often, when people consider a career in psychology, they envision therapists or counselors, but the reality is, there are countless unique paths you can take as a psychologist! Some of the most intriguing branches include social psychology (exploring human behavior), cognitive psychology (delving into mental processes), biopsychology (understanding the link between biology and behavior), developmental psychology (examining human growth and development), and personality psychology (analyzing personality traits), among many others! If you opt to take an introductory psychology course in high school or college, you'll get a taste of each of these facets of psychology. And if you choose to major in psychology, you'll have the thrilling chance to dive deeper into each of these fields through semester-long courses. It's such an exhilarating journey!

One of the most rewarding aspects of being a psychologist is the constant opportunity for learning and discovery! The majority of our understanding of contemporary psychology has been uncovered in the past half-century, thanks to dedicated psychologists conducting groundbreaking research and gaining fresh perspectives! For instance, in clinical psychology, the DSM (the manual of mental disorders) is regularly updated as we continue to learn more about mental health. Researchers across all fields of psychology are perpetually striving to uncover and comprehend new elements of human behavior to better understand why we are the way we are. It's incredibly thrilling to be at the forefront of these novel developments in the field, with fresh and exciting insights emerging every day!
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