Skip to main content
3 answers
4
Asked 934 views

Is a pre-pharmacy major in college a lot of work?

I understand that all college majors are a lot of work but i am a senior that will be going to a Division I school for athletics and I am very interested in doing something in the pharmacy field. But, I am a tad bit worried about the work load. #pharmacy #pre-pharmacy #college-major

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

4

3 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Palak’s Answer

I agree with Jaclyn - it's about time management. By no means is it difficult. It's great that you are considering a career in pharmacy. Pre-pharmacy isn't a degree, but rather a cluster of classes (e.g., biology, chemistry, anatomy, calculus) that are required by the pharmacy school to gain admission. Each pharmacy school has its own sets of requirements and some require you have a bachelor's degree so I would look into specific pharmacy schools for more guidance. Your counselor in the college you will be attending will be able to provide guidance as well.

I hope this helps - but I would be too worried about the workload as long you manage your time and prioritize, you will be fine. It's about figuring out the right balance of personal time, studies, and engagements (e.g., sports, clubs).
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Desiree’s Answer

Hey Peyton! I was a All-American NCAA Div 2 athlete and did a double science major (with all those labs!).

There was one semester that one of my labs conflicted in part with my afternoon training session a couple times a week, but the coaching staff worked with me so that I ended up with an alternative training that semester (On those afternoons, I'd come late to practice and train part with the team, then stay late to do part on my own). In my experience, the coaches know that with college-athletes, the college part comes first. (NCAA tries to reinforce this, too.) But also, if you picked one science major - instead of 2! - this would be less likely to happen. That was my only schedule conflict.

For away competitions, team travel would occasionally require me to miss a class and, with advance notice, all my professors worked with me. (I had a friend's notes, make-up time in the lab, etc - today it's likely even easier with so much on-line and recorded!) That said - you need to maintain your credibility with both your coaches and your professors. You cannot ditch/disrupt class and then expect the professor to accommodate your sport schedule. Be upstanding and focused when in class, so that your professors know you are serious about your studies. The first class every semester, I'd explain my athletic schedule to the professors, so that they'd know and so that I wouldn't be in any last-minute situations.

My sport occurred all fall semester and about 1/2 of spring semester (depending on performance!), so I wasn't able to schedule classes around my season. Also, many science classes required 2-semesters (e.g., Organic Chem1 offered only in Fall and Organic Chem 2 offered only in Spring). You should think strategically about your sports/academic schedule, but I wanted to share my real-world experience. (I did not take summer classes, but that might be an option for certain 1-semester courses to free up your schedule for your 2-semester science/lab courses.)

I encourage you to follow your academic interests. As much as I loved being a college athlete -- and continued to participate in "Masters" teams and competition after college -- it was unrealistic for me to make a career out of that. I am very happy to have a solid education that got me started on my career path. I could have done an "easy" major or taken only one science major, but looking back I wouldn't change a thing. My education and the work ethic demonstrated by being a college athlete opened many doors. If you can graduate with strong grades as a college-athlete, it's a testament to your time management, ability to focus, and prioritization skills -- and potential employers will take note of all that!

Desiree recommends the following next steps:

Talk to your Div 1 coaching staff about your academic goals and concerns about workload management. Some teams can help coordinated with professors and/or offer tutors.
Research the courses required for admission to pharma school.
Look over the course schedule at your university and plot out a sample for your years at college - when you'd take what requied classes at least (you can fill in electives later), with that you can better assess potential conflicts.
Consult with academic advisor or dean about how to best manage your desired course load and balance it with your sport schedule.
Don't wait until the last minute: develop a game plan, get the help you need from coaches and academic advisors. You don't have to do this alone and you may not know all the resources available to you until you ask for (proactive) help.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jaclyn’s Answer

Hi Peyton,

A pre-pharmacy major, while playing sports, will be difficult but you absolutely can manage it. Based on the type of sport you're playing and the season, you will likely want to schedule more difficult or time consuming classes in the off-season. I would also recommend taking some classes in the summer when you have more time to focus on your studies. You will also need to communicate with your coach to schedule classes around your practices, lifting, and game/meet schedules.

Additionally, you will have to make studying for your classes a priority. I would recommend getting a group of people together to study for tests in your classes, and preferably, people who do not play sports so that if you ever have to miss a class, you can get their notes. I would also recommend setting up times to speak with your professors well in advance of any scheduled exams if you are confused by anything. Finally, if your school offers tutors in your class subjects, I highly recommend you meet with them frequently if for no other reason than to hold you accountable for studying. I majored in chemistry while running track and some of these are hard lessons I learned or resources I utilized that worked out for me. The work will be worth it in the long run though, so good luck and find a plan that works for you!
0