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Do you have to specialize in emergency/trauma to become an RN in the ER?

I want to become an ER nurse. #futurenurse #nursing #medicine

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janet’s Answer

I believe that would depend on where you are applying for a position. The hospitals in my area are hiring new grads out of school. The hospitals provide the opportunity for continued education and usually require specific education depending on the ER you work in. The problem is finding the time to study and prepare for testing because they do not allow for time off from work for the education. Most of the hospitals in my area work 12 hours shifts and have currently instituted 1 mandatory extra day per week due to short staffing. I would advise you to talk with nurses who work in the ER from your area facilities. Good luck.
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Vernon’s Answer

Hi Yesenia, some ER's may hire you as a new grad RN or as a seasoned RN with no prior ER experience. Usually this depends on how bad the department needs staffing. Generally, a nurse has to be hired before they can be specialized. All the training you get in nursing school is fundamental, you put it all into play on the job. You will get ER/Trauma specialized with on the job training and experience. Most hospitals will send their ER nurses for initial and continued ER/Trauma training/education.
Thank you comment icon Yesenia, the simple answer is no. We’d all like to hire nurses with some sort of emergency background (EMT, paramedic, ED technician), we do hire some nurses straight out of nursing school with no emergency background. Some larger hospitals are now offering “Nursing Internships”! They will offer nursing internships to graduate nurses or newer nurses looking for a new specialty. These internship programs include critical care, emergency, and operating room nursing. There is a blend of classroom instruction and preceptor training on the units that can last 6 months, in return the employer will often seek a two year commitment from you in exchange for their investment in you. Jac Getzinger
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