Skip to main content
15 answers
15
Asked 899 views

Which career is best for me?

Hi, I'm a student that's super lost about jobs. Like, I keep obsessing over jobs ever since summer break started I can't enjoy my vacation. I know that I enjoy writing, animals, art, finding information, and sharing resources. However, Idk what jobs could actually match my skills. I'm fine with sitting at a computer, but want to be useful for society and work in something that's not too stressful. Does anyone have any career suggestions to look into? Also, INFJ if that matters or anything.

Note: this question was asked anonymously by a student

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

15

15 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rebecca’s Answer

Hello there!

It's completely normal to feel a bit overwhelmed when it comes to deciding on a career path. However, it's fantastic that you have identified your areas of interest: writing, animals, art, finding information, and sharing resources. This is a great starting point!

Considering your interests and personality type (INFJ), you might find the following career paths appealing:

Technical Writer or Editor: This could involve writing and editing manuals, user guides, and other technical documents. It's a career that combines your love for writing and information gathering, and it's very much in demand.

Animal Care and Service Workers: This can include a variety of jobs, such as animal shelter manager, animal trainer, or veterinary assistant. If you enjoy working with animals and have a knack for sharing resources and information, this could be a rewarding path.

Librarian or Information Specialist: This role involves organizing, accessing, and disseminating information - perfect for someone who loves finding and sharing information. Plus, in this job, you'd be contributing to your community, which seems to align well with your desire to do meaningful work.

Nonprofit Work: Given your INFJ personality and your desire to contribute to society, you might find working for a nonprofit organization fulfilling. Many roles within nonprofits could leverage your writing skills and your ability to find and share resources.

Social Media Manager/Content Creator: Given your diverse interests, this role would allow you to write, create, and share information about various topics you're passionate about. This can be in a wide range of industries from animal care, art, education, to non-profit organizations.

Remember, it's important to explore different fields and gain practical experiences to understand what you enjoy and what you're good at. Internships, part-time jobs, and volunteering can offer valuable insight.

Lastly, keep in mind that it's okay to not have everything figured out right now. Career paths are often non-linear, and many people end up in careers they never predicted they would enjoy. The key is to stay open and curious, and to see every experience as a chance to learn more about yourself and your professional interests.

Hope this helps! Feel free to ask if you have more questions or need further clarification.
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Hugh’s Answer

A lot of great advice has already been given here, I'd like to add that now may be the best time to begin your networking strategy. Find out which people in your life have what you want, i.e., writers, people who work with animals, etc., and talk to them about their journey - ask them how they got there. Find out what steps they took that led them to the jobs they love. They can provide some valuable insights into how you can do the same as well as introduce you to other people who can help.
You also want to expand your network and reach out to professionals who you may not know at all. LinkedIn is a great tool for that. Search for people who are in the fields you're interested in and engage with them. Ask for 15 minutes of their time to talk about their career paths. You'll find that most people are very willing to help - especially if you begin the conversation by talking about THEM.

Wishing you much success in all your endeavors!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Josh’s Answer

This is a great question that so many students are trying to figure out! There's plenty of advice out there, including on this thread, that provides great answers for clarifying career paths and the decision-making process. To add an additional perspective to this discussion, I'd recommend taking time for yourself to truly understand what energizes you day to day. You mentioned that some activities like writing, animals, and art are interesting to you. This is a fantastic place to start! Build on these experiences and try and identify why these activities energize you. From there you can research potential career paths that allows you to work on these activities! Best of luck.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Alisa’s Answer

One thing I quickly realized as I applied for jobs after college is the sheer volume of jobs out there that I'd never heard of. There were many jobs that aligned with my skills and interests that I never would have thought to search for. It can be very difficult to get a sense of what a job or field entails when you're still in school.

Going to job fairs is a great way to hear more about companies, job opportunities, requirements, and day-in-the-life descriptions. You can also get in contact with someone at a college or university who can provide you with more information about a field and the potential jobs after college. For example, if you think you'd be interested in Humanities, such as English (which involves a lot of writing/editing), you could visit the English department's webpage to find the contact information of someone who could help. You could ask them if there's any faculty or students who'd be able to provide you with information about the schooling and prospective jobs for that field, as well as information about their own experience. If you live near a college or university, you could also get in contact with someone who may be able to connect you with groups of students to meet with in person.

Another great place to start would be looking at job postings of positions you think sound interesting. For example, you could look on Indeed.com for jobs that have the word "Writer" in the job title. You'll quickly see a vast array of different writing jobs and estimated salaries, and you can take a look at what the job responsibilities are and the required experience. Perhaps you've always thought a job like Technical Writer sounds interesting, but then you read about what the job responsibilities and discover that the job no longer sounds interesting to you. A job search will also enable you to see the various fields of writing, such as technical writing, user experience (UX) writing, content writing, copywriting, creative writing, grant writing, etc. You might learn about new fields you'd never considered before. Then you can see all the adjacent jobs that are similar to writing, such as editing, researching, marketing, etc.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Chris’s Answer

Make the most of your initial career opportunities after school to accomplish two key objectives:
1) Continue refining your abilities and/or use your job to discover other talents you may possess
2) Pursue positions that enable you to achieve financial independence, allowing you to concentrate on what truly matters. It's much simpler to work towards a suitable career when your basic needs are met.

As you gain confidence in these two aspects, it becomes easier and more fulfilling to decide where to apply your skills. Remember, most of your first jobs after school won't be your "dream career." Discovering your passion and ideal career requires time! Be patient, and trust that as long as you keep working towards your goals, success will be yours! :)
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Charise’s Answer

Hi there!

The above answers are great. I also wanted to give you another option as many seem to suggest working with animals. I'm a Technical Writer. This could be a good option for you as well. Especially if you found an animal related company to work for. You'd be surrounded by your interest, and get to create content for what you're invested in. I hope this gives you another option/path to think about. Most importantly, enjoy your vacation! Don't stress yourself about it! The fact that you're already thinking about it is a great start.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rose’s Answer

Hey there! No need to stress, you're not the only one in this situation! A lot of people have a hard time figuring out which job to go for and how it connects with their interests. Great job on taking the first step by recognizing your love for writing, animals, art, research, and sharing information. Considering your interests, a few exciting career options could be Animal Writer, Animal Scientist, Pet Content Creator, Research Analyst, or Biologist!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Cinni’s Answer

Dear student,

If I would be you, I would choose a career that I'm passionate about and also reasonably pay my bills. it's very important to feel happy and satisfied about your job and equally important to know that it would match your financial situation now and in the future so try to think of the career which can bring this balance.

Wish you all the best in choosing the right career for yourself.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Blakely A.’s Answer

It sounds like you'd be a great Intake Coordinator at an animal shelter/rescue. You get to write bios for the incoming animals, investigate cases and find information, share resources about animal advocacy/ support, and get creative with how you present animals for adoption. The caveat of this is that it can be stressful. It would be important to look into the shelter management and be picky about where you work because a lot of shelters are underfunded and running out of space, creating a difficult environment. If you're going to college and are interested in this field, I'd encourage you to take a grant writing course and volunteer with a local shelter to write a grant proposal for them to secure funding. You could make a great impact by getting rescues the resources they need to keep up with the ever-growing influx of surrendered and rescued animals.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rosanne’s Answer

Hello,

While it might be currently confusing for you, I would advise you to take a step back and reflect on what it is that you see yourself doing everyday of your adult life, that will bring you joy and closer to your dream life.
For me, it was not a hard decision to study accounting and be in my current field as an Audit analyst. I have seen all the women in my family, embrace and master the role of an Accountant and as a young child, it has been my dream to work as an Accountant and later in life a Businesswoman.
I have not always been confident in myself and whether or not I will be good at it, but because I had the role models in my life to make me believe that I can do it better, it motivated me to work hard and finally get to where I've always wanted to.
Do you have anyone that inspire you? Anyone, your internal voice said, I'd love to be like him or her one day? Choosing a career path should not be a burden but rather something that gives you pure and authentic passion!

I know you mentioned that you enjoy writing, animals, art, finding information, and sharing resources.
Writing- Perhaps pursuing a career as a journalist, editor, author?
Animals- Maybe you see yourself as a veterinarian, caring for animals.
Finding information- Journalist, scientific researcher, business/ financial analyst, forensics investigator
Sharing resources- Marketing, Journalist, Public relations

I am not here to tell you what career you should pursue, but based on your interests Journalist seems to keep popping up a lot, however I must say anything that brings you joy/ passion and doesn't feel like work should be your career choice.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Emily’s Answer

Hello,

I understand that contemplating the future and securing the ideal job to kick off your career can be quite nerve-wracking. One key insight I can share is not to fret too much about the exact nature of the job when you're just starting out, unless you're aiming for a highly specialized profession like a doctor or dentist. Given your diverse skills and interests, I recommend focusing on jobs that offer valuable experiences to pave the way for your future.

In the worst-case scenario, you might land a job that you don't particularly enjoy - but remember, you're not trapped forever, and every experience teaches you something, even if it's about what you don't like or the kind of management style you'd like to adopt.

I must admit that even after 8 years of working since college, I'm still figuring out what I want to do "when I grow up." My approach is to take one day at a time, seek new experiences, connect with new people, and strive for growth each and every day.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Silas’s Answer

Hey there! Make the most of your summer break right now! Don't worry about the future, as life is constantly evolving. It's absolutely normal to be uncertain about the ideal career for you. In reality, a majority of graduates find themselves working in fields entirely different from their initial plans. Tackle life one step at a time, and welcome challenges with open arms.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Emina’s Answer

Hello!

Thank you for being open and honest about your preferences. It's completely fine if you haven't figured out your future career yet – it'll come to you in due time.

My suggestion is to try an internship, a summer job, or volunteering at a place that captures your interest. For instance, my own career is in Human Resources, but during high school and college summer breaks, I worked at various places (serving meals at a retirement home, working at Panera Bread, being a salesperson at a clothing store, nannying/babysitting, and being a student worker on campus). None of those summer jobs were directly related to Human Resources, but they helped me discover my passion for working with people. This eventually led me to my career as I grew older.

I hope this advice is helpful!
Emina
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brandon’s Answer

I'm glad to hear that you've discovered some of your passions and talents! With your love for writing, animals, art, research, and sharing resources, here are a few career options that could match your interests and preferences:

Content Writer or Copywriter: As a talented writer, you might enjoy a career in content writing or copywriting. You could work for businesses, marketing firms, or even as a freelancer, crafting engaging and informative content for websites, blogs, social media, or promotional materials.

Technical Writer: If you're good at explaining complicated information in a simple and clear way, technical writing might be a great fit. Technical writers produce documents, user guides, or instruction manuals for software, products, or scientific processes.

Journalist: If you love researching and sharing information, you might want to consider a career in journalism. Journalists dig into and report news stories for various media outlets, such as newspapers, magazines, online publications, or broadcasting platforms.

Animal Welfare Advocate: Combine your love for animals with a passion for making a positive difference in their lives. You could work for animal rights organizations, wildlife conservation groups, or animal shelters, advocating for animal welfare, promoting adoption, or raising awareness about animal-related issues.

Art Therapist: If you have a strong interest in art and helping others, art therapy could be a rewarding career choice. Art therapists use creative techniques to help individuals express themselves, process emotions, and improve their overall well-being.

Researcher or Librarian: Given your passion for finding information, you might want to explore careers in research or librarianship. You could work in academic institutions, think tanks, or libraries, conducting research, organizing information, and helping others access resources.

Social Media Manager: As someone who's comfortable with digital platforms, you could consider a role as a social media manager. In this position, you would create and manage social media content, engage with online communities, and promote brands or organizations.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Hello there,

Exploring the Differences between Clinical and Counseling Psychology

Clinical and counseling psychology are two fascinating branches of psychology, both dedicated to fostering mental health and well-being. They do, however, differ in their focus, techniques, and the people they serve. To choose the best major for you, it's crucial to grasp the unique aspects of each field.

Clinical psychology is a specialized branch that zeroes in on diagnosing, treating, and preventing mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. Clinical psychologists work with a diverse array of clients, from those grappling with severe mental illnesses and developmental disabilities to those managing chronic medical conditions. They often employ evidence-based practices like cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and psychotherapy. Additionally, they might conduct research to assess the effectiveness of various treatment methods.

On the flip side, counseling psychology is centered around fostering personal and interpersonal adjustment, career development, and overall well-being. Counseling psychologists assist clients facing a range of life hurdles, such as relationship issues, work stress, or adapting to life changes. They utilize a variety of therapeutic approaches, including person-centered therapy, existential therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. They also offer assessment and consultation services to individuals, groups, and organizations.

Assisting Everyday People and Those with Disorders

If your ambition is to aid everyday people and those with disorders, both clinical and counseling psychology can equip you with the necessary skills and knowledge. Clinical psychologists often work with people confronting various life challenges, while counseling psychologists also assist clients dealing with similar issues.

However, clinical psychologists have a wider scope of practice, dealing with more severe mental health issues, whereas counseling psychologists tend to focus more on everyday problems and personal growth. If you're passionate about addressing everyday issues and fostering personal growth, counseling psychology might be your perfect match.

Embarking on a Career as a Therapist

Both clinical and counseling psychology can pave the way to a rewarding career as a therapist. In both fields, you'll acquire a range of therapeutic techniques and strategies to help individuals navigate their mental health challenges. The specific type of therapist you become, however, will hinge on your chosen specialization.

Clinical psychologists can become licensed psychologists, providing therapy for individuals with mental health disorders. They might work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, or private practice. Counseling psychologists, on the other hand, can also become licensed therapists, working in diverse environments like schools, colleges, private practice, and community mental health centers.

Key Reference Titles

American Psychological Association (APA): The APA is a respected scientific and professional organization that represents psychologists in the United States. Their website is a treasure trove of information on various psychology fields, including clinical and counseling psychology.

American Psychological Society (APS): The APS is another esteemed organization dedicated to advancing psychological science and its application for public benefit. They provide valuable information on research, careers, and professional development in psychology, including clinical and counseling psychology.

Society for Counseling Psychology (SCP): The SCP is a division of the APA that represents counseling psychologists. They focus on promoting research, education, and practice in the field of counseling psychology, offering resources, publications, and events related to this field.

In conclusion, both clinical and counseling psychology can equip you with the skills and knowledge to assist people with everyday problems and those with disorders. Your choice between the two fields may hinge on your interests and the specific type of therapist you aspire to become. It's crucial to explore both fields and consult with professionals in the field to make an informed decision about the major that best aligns with your goals and passions.

Don't forget to check out my autobiography for a list of foods that are packed with the nutrients essential for academic work and brain function. Incorporating these foods into your diet can make a significant difference in your life and your ability to handle stress.

May you be abundantly blessed!
James.
0