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What are some MDs in the field that don't require being on call?

What are some MDs in the field that don't require being on call? I want to become a doctor, but don't want to be one that's on call because I know I would not have a steady life.

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Michel’s Answer

Depending on field and places you work you can avoid call. A lot of radiologists careers can avoid call, but some will require it depending on where you work. Surgery in most places will require call. Dermatology will not and if you did get called in it would have to be something extremely severe. Other fields like Emergency Medicine typically have consistent schedules but depending where you are at you may need to come in. Short answer a lot of the jobs will not require you to go on call but it is important to look at contracts when you are signing and what options are available to you. Being an MD doesn’t mean you are doomed to call. Great question.
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Kathan’s Answer

If you're dreaming of wearing a white coat but don't fancy the idea of being on call, then pathology could be your calling. In this field, you'll delve into the fascinating world of diseases, studying them in a lab setting. Alternatively, radiology might suit you. This specialty focuses on interpreting medical images and often provides more consistent working hours.

If you're passionate about knowledge sharing or making groundbreaking discoveries, consider venturing into medical research or teaching in medical education. These areas typically offer a more predictable schedule.

Public health is another avenue you might want to explore. This sector usually adheres to regular work hours, making it a great choice if you value a balanced lifestyle. It's crucial to investigate these different medical fields to discover the one that aligns best with your personal needs and aspirations. Remember, the perfect fit is out there waiting for you!
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Aisha’s Answer

Hello. If you are interested in the medical field but prefer not to work directly in patient care or be in a clinical setting, there are several medical-related careers that do not require you to be in the field. Here are a few examples:

1. Medical Writing: Medical writers create content for healthcare publications, medical journals, pharmaceutical companies, or healthcare websites.

2. Medical Transcription: Medical transcriptionists listen to voice recordings dictated by healthcare professionals and convert them into written reports.

4. Healthcare IT: Working in healthcare IT involves managing and maintaining the technology systems and software used in healthcare settings. This can include electronic health records (EHRs), health information management systems, or medical imaging systems.
7. Clinical Research Coordinator: Clinical research coordinators assist in managing research studies, ensuring compliance with protocols, recruiting participants, and collecting data.

These roles allow you to support the medical field indirectly but still contribute to improving healthcare outcomes. It's important to note that some of these positions may require specific certifications or education, so further research and training may be needed to pursue these careers. I hope this helps.
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Audrey’s Answer

Hi N,

Family medicine is a medical field with a lot of flexibility; they usually work regular hours. Most family medicine doctors I work with have a pretty standard 8-5 work day and work 4 or 5 days a week. I think, in general, many primary care providers have flexibility over their schedules depending on where they work, and because primary care is a non-emergent field, being on call isn't necessary. So, family medicine and primary care for pediatrics are the two main ones.

Other specialist fields have much more control over their schedule and aren't expected to be on call for the hospital. A lot of dermatology clinics, rheumatologists, pathologists, podiatrists, orthopedics, oncologists, and hematologists I know have a standard workweek and aren't expected to be on call. Also, physical medicine and rehabilitation doctors.

Basically, many on-call fields are types of internal medicine (cardiology, nephrology, gastroenterology, pulmonology, neurology, critical care), ambulatory medicine, emergency medicine, and ob/gyn.

And I think it depends on where you work and where you are in your training. During medical school and residency, you will have less control over your hours and whether or not you're on call (in medical school, you are guaranteed to be on call during certain rotations; it's mandatory). But once you get past those training years, you'll have more control over your practice of medicine and what you want your schedule to look like.

I hope this answer helps! Best of luck to you.
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