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What is the path I need to take post-secondary for a career in hematology ?

There’s really no obvious path because, at least to my knowledge, getting on the specific track comes after graduate school in either residency or something else.

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Rosemarie’s Answer

Hello Dani
Another pathway could be through obtaining a BS in Medical Laboratory Scientist, after which you can get into a masters degree program in hematology. If you choose not to go the medical school route.
Being a Medical Laboratory Scientist you go through a clinical internship where Hematology is a part of the rotation and you will also get exposure to all areas of the laboratory and learn theory and practical.
Hope this helps!
Rosemarie
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Kimberly’s Answer

Hi Dani,
If you choose not to go to Med School, then alternatively you can still work in Hematology as a Physician Assistant (PA), Nurse Practitioner (NP), or Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN). These positions require graduate school which would be an additional 2-3 years beyond a Bachelor's Degree. In our hospital system, these providers are very independent and are able to sign orders for blood products, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy for some malignant hematology patients with Leukemia, Lymphoma, and bone marrow failure. Specifically, this field is known as Hematology/Oncology.

You will need to check licensing in your state for the scope of practice for PAs and NPs for working in specialized medicine such as Hematology.
For example, at our clinic, a Physician Assistant (PA) can work in Hematology without any additional certifications. However, Nurse Practitioners have to be certified in Hematology to practice. I hope this helps! ---Kimberly S, RN

Kimberly recommends the following next steps:

https://medicalboard.georgia.gov
https://www.physicianassistantedu.org/georgia
https://www.graduatenursingedu.org/georgia
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Emma’s Answer

Hello Dani,

If you're interested in pursuing a career in hematology, the medical field that deals with blood-related disorders, there's a clear, though comprehensive, educational and training journey you'll need to embark on after high school.

Start off by earning a bachelor's degree in a field like biology, biochemistry, or biomedical sciences. Make sure to focus on classes that cover cellular and molecular biology, genetics, and physiology. It's also a great idea to get involved in hematology-related research projects during your undergraduate years to get some hands-on experience.

Next up is medical school, which is a four-year program that covers a wide range of medical topics. You'll learn about everything from anatomy and pharmacology to pathology, and you'll also get to experience clinical rotations in various specialties. This will lay the groundwork for your future specialization in hematology.

After medical school, you'll need to complete a three-year residency in internal medicine. This will give you a solid understanding of internal medicine and patient care. After that, you'll move on to a two to three-year fellowship in hematology/oncology. Here, you'll receive advanced training in diagnosing and treating blood disorders, as well as conducting research in the field.

Once you've completed your fellowship, you can apply for board certification in hematology through the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM). This certification will officially recognize your expertise in the field.

To stay up-to-date in this fast-paced field, it's important to continue learning throughout your career. This can be done by attending conferences, participating in research, and engaging in ongoing medical education.

Yes, this path does require a lot of dedication and extensive training, but the rewards are immense. You'll have the chance to make a huge difference in patients' lives and contribute to the advancement of medical knowledge in hematology. I hope this gives you a clearer picture!
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