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How did you know your career was the right one for you?

How did you know the job you were working was going to be your ultimate career?

Thank you comment icon Good question to start with. You need to search out for joy, peace excitement, calmness, passion and satisfaction within you concerning a chosen career., the greatest of them all is joy. Once you find joy from the inside of you concerning your career,, it means you are on the right path. Patricia Okey-Ohuonu
Thank you comment icon Follow your heart and do what you will always love doing. Alice Mwangi
Thank you comment icon I would say you have to love what you do for your career to be right for you.. sometimes it takes years for someone to know if a career is right for them, but I would say if you love what you do and you are at piece with it.. then thats your answer.... jasmine mcmahan
Thank you comment icon I think you should consider the difference between a career and a profession. A profession is 1) something you enjoy, 2) that you are good at, and 3) that people will pay you for. If you have 1, that's a hobby. If you are 2, you have expertise. If you have 3, it's a job. But if you have all 3, that's a profession. Start with 1 and 2 and figure out a way to get people to pay you for it. Stephen Jenkins

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Subject: Career question for you

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Brandy’s Answer

I wish I could provide an answer that would really tell you how however, it can vary. I can say that after almost 20 years with my career, I still consider a career change periodically. First, I will say that you have to be passionate about the type of work you do. Everyone has there own reason for being passionate about something. Next I will say that being happy with your employer is also important. Mine provides many opportunities and they stand behind a code of ethics that align with my own. Last, if you begin to consider a career change, think about what is driving that thought. Is it no longer challenging, is it a poor work/ life balance or are you unhappy with your coworker/ boss relationships. Many reasons that I have considered the change are not really related to the work itself but the factors of the environment. This may take periodic changes to refresh your passion in what you do but it is a controllable environment if you are aware of the drivers.
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Katlin
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Chirayu’s Answer

You may find it quickly or you may never find it. What you end up doing may be completely different than what you may have studied, that is why getting experience is key or working hands on. You never know what you end up liking. Work towards something you have a passion for and you may just end up finding a career there.
Thank you comment icon I am really grateful you took the time to answer this question. Katlin
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Michel’s Answer

This is a great question.

I believe one of the biggest things to look for is what gives you joy. Create a list of things that make you happy and what you are looking for in life. When I did this a lot time ago I fell on the medical field. The reason I landed in the medical field is because I knew I loved science and I knew that I liked continued education and helping people. Once I found the medical field it came down to what my abilities were. I first started looking into nursing, but after time I realized it didn’t challenge me as much as I wanted so I moved to medicine to challenge myself. I love a challenge and that is what medicine has been for me. Difficult classes, but in things I love and enjoy.

Try multiple things out. I think something that can really help is look into volunteering or being able to shadow people that are in a field that you enjoy. If you are interested in business ask people what they do throughout the day and see if that is something that interests you. If you find something that you truly fall in love with things will feel right. That doesn’t mean that things won’t be difficult at times. But you will be able to look through those difficult times and see the end goal of becoming a business owner or a doctor and that will put things back into perspective.

Thank you comment icon Thank you for giving me advice. Katlin
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Lakita’s Answer

I knew my last semester in college, which had nothing to do with my major. I took a class in Human Resource Management and knew that's what I wanted to do because it peeked my interest more than the things I was studying for my major.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Lakita! Katlin
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Jenny’s Answer

Seek out the job and career that you genuinely are interested in. If it's something that makes you curious and can get you up in the morning, then you're going down the right road. To get a better idea on whether the career is right for you, you have to go out and try different activities in those fields both direct and indirect. For example, if you were interested in potentially becoming a doctor, look for opportunities to shadow or chat with a doctor or medical student. This may even be one of your friend's parents. Within school, you could participate in school clubs or events honing in on this profession such as HOSA. You could even watch videos/blogs of individuals working in those fields giving their testimonials and walking through their day-to-day tasks. If by partaking in these activities you can see yourself doing similar tasks on a daily and still maintaining your enthusiasm for the field, then you found one career path you could potentially pursue. This is only one of many paths you can choose to go down and if you later realize your motivations have shifted, you can change to a different job within the same field or even in a completely different field. Afterall, the average person makes 3-7 career changes throughout their working life.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Jenny. Katlin
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Gina’s Answer

I think that "right for you" is open to interpretation. I tried a few things and did them until I wasn't happy doing it anymore. My goal has always been to be happy with what I do and if I am not, figure out the path to change it so I can be happy. I have not always been happy with my past jobs, but they were a means to an end and that is okay too. Ultimately, I would say there is not right answer here. Just try to do what makes you happy as often as you can and hopefully, you can turn it into a career!!!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. Katlin
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Francne’s Answer

In all honesty, I am not sure we always know what career is right for us and for some choosing a career is something that comes with time. If you are working just for money, you have or are seeking a job. Jobs do have the capacity to turn into careers if you desire. If you are looking to work in and grow in an industry over time, you are seeking a career that just might be right for you. To find the "right career," I recommend you start with really understanding what you are interested in and have a passion to learn or do. I would love to tell you that it is as simple as identifying the ideal job that aligns with your passion, finding it and just doing it. Unfortunately, often times, identifying and creating a career path based on passion alone does not always net the "right career" or joy in doing what you love. You should take the time to identify the type job that would be a good fit for you, learn the industry you are considering and researching career possibilities. From there, understand the steps you need to take to grow your career. Know that it is okay to adjust career goals along the way. Good Luck!
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Katlin
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Cassandra R’s Answer

I discovered my career based on my interest. For example, when I was in high-school, I was interested in Fashion. However, when I was looking at colleges, I wanted to attend a college that offered fashion as a major but also offer sports. I chose to attend NC State University where I was able to major in Textile and Apparel Management and offered sports (track). It gave me more business and technical experience in the industry and I graduated and worked in the industry (Sara Lee Corporation, which owned Coach and other apparel brands). Through my experience at Sara Lee Corporation, I worked a great deal with the marketing which sparked my interest. From there, I explored going back to school to transition to Marketing. I've been in Marketing ever since. So everything started with my initial interests. There is no one path so I encourage you to always do what you enjoy because your passion for that will shine through.
Thank you comment icon I will use this advice as I prepare for my career. Katlin
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Deborah’s Answer

I knew my career was right for me when I felt a deep sense of satisfaction and alignment with my skills, interests, and values.
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Michael’s Answer

Hi Katlin!

Thanks for the question. Finding the right career can be a difficult and a seemingly daunting task. You ask for advice from friends, family, loved ones, all who might give you a different response, much like this thread I suppose. I struggled in high school to decide what I wanted to study for a career. At first I was going to go to school to be a Meteorologist, but after I dug a little deeper and looked at the course work I knew I wouldn't be happy - math was, and still is not, my strong suit. After I decided meteorology wasn't in the cards for me, I needed to do some much needed self-reflecting to figure out what else I had a passion for, which is how I uncovered Hospitality and Tourism. My first piece of advice is to take time, reflect, and be honest with yourself, try and uncover what brings you joy and pursue that.

My second piece of advice is don't think of your career choice as final... ever! You can always change your mind and seek out something different. Along your career path you most likely will find other interests and opportunities that you never thought existed, pursue them without fear.

My final piece of advice, don't forget to have fun and enjoy yourself.

Best of luck to you!
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David’s Answer

Hi!,
Truth be told you don't always know. Some people know from an early age what they want to do and some never really figure it out. The point is it's ok either way. You have to follow your heart in what fulfills you and makes you happy in life. Your career should make you happy and satisfied and that is not always easy to find. Trust yourself and don't worry if you try something out and it's not for you. That's ok. Many people change careers multiple times throughout their lifetime which is perfectly normal. I'm sure you will do great!!

All the Best,

David
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the advice. Katlin
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Patti’s Answer

There isn't necessarily one perfect career. You may find that what feels right at one point in your career evolves as you decide to take on new challenges. And you may find that what you study in school can apply to several careers in which you can be successful. As an example, I studied journalism in college, but found early on my career within journalism that I was a better editor than reporter. Because of that discovery, I spent a large part of my career as a magazine editor. But as the job market changed, I applied my editing skills to other areas like editing marketing materials. Through that exploration into marketing, I found that I enjoyed the creativity of becoming a marketing copywriter. Now I've moved up to become a marketing manager in which I can help mentor younger colleagues on the skills I honed throughout my career. I've always found success when you are working in a job in which you continue to learn and grow from. And, it's always important to find a job in which you enjoy collaborating with your colleagues. If you do that, your work will be rewarding and won't feel so much like "work."
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Katlin
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Jackson’s Answer

Katlin: I recently delivered a talk at our company titled, Career Advice - Follow Your Passion.

Following your passion is one of the de facto pieces of advice for American careers. This is an appealing concept. Figure out what you love and match it to your work/ problem solved.

Steve Jobs talked about Passion at Work in his 2005 Standford University Commencement Speech. (see YouTube link below). He said, “Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.”

It turns out to follow your passion is a piece of bad career advice. There are two issues with this piece of career advice. First, following your passion means we all know what our passion is. Most young people don't have pre-existing passion. Second, matching your work to pre-existing passion will make you satisfied. There is no evidence that this is true or it works.

According to Cal Newport, author of the book - So Good They Can't Ignore You - Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love. The specific of work is not what's important. The specific is less important than the general traits. What we desire at work is autonomy, exercising creativity, making an impact, having respect, power, affluence, etc.. How do you obtain or acquire the desired general traits in what you do?

Workers need to build up rare and valuable skills. Exchange rare and valuable skills to gain roles with autonomy, creativity, impact, etc..

Start with your education. Figure out what rare and valuable skills you can and are willing to develop. Exchange your career capital (rare and valuable skills) for your career of choice. Steve Jobs said, "If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.”

Jackson recommends the following next steps:

Watch Steve Jobs talks about Passion at Work YouTube video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXXwFG3_x2g
Watch Cal Newport talks about his book, So Good They Can't Ignore You, at Google. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwOdU02SE0w
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, Jackson! Katlin
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. There is not a career right for you throughout your life time. You may interest may change or you may find another career you have more interest.
Firstly, I suggest you find a career you have interest and have some short to medium term plan to develop your career.
Below are my suggestions :
1. Think about your hobbies, your favorite subjects, etc. and identify the related careers
2. Explore these careers and find out what you have interest
3. Speak to someone working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 career you would like to pursue
5. Find out the entry criteria of relevant subjects in the college.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for giving me advice. Katlin
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Ellen’s Answer

To be honest, I always wanted to be in law originally. I worked as a Barristers Clerk in the UK, and had done this for two years.

Sadly, I realised the reality of it, how there are lines crossed, and the risks it presented to my mental health.

However, from this, I realised that I wanted to be in a caring role for people, and loved animals. Therefore, I am now training to be an animal behaviourist, whilst doing a veterinary degree.

On the other hand, one of the BEST advice I can give you, is do not put ANY pressure on yourself to choose a career! Life is all about twists and turns, and trying many different roles. Experience and learn from others, but most of all enjoy what you are doing, because that may be something you do for almost all of your life.
Thank you comment icon You rock! This advice is very helpful. Katlin