Skip to main content
5 answers
5
Asked 221 views

How do I chose what I might want to major in? I have so many ideas but I’m not sure.

I want to do ceramics, criminal justice, maybe nursing, psychology, or early education. Thanks!

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

5

5 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Danielle (Desso)’s Answer

It sounds like you already have a lot interests which is great! I would do more research on each of the topics that you're interested in. Make a list of what is most important to you in a career path/life. From there, I would then write out a pro/con list of each topic.

A lot of majors in college are very broad and you can apply that major into many different types of careers.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. I am glad to hear that you have a wide range of interest. However, you may need to shortlist a few career related to your interest and the relevant subjects will be your major and minor in the collage.
Below are my suggestion
1. Identify the careers related to your interest
E,g, would you like to be an Primary / Kindergarten teacher, psychologist, solicitor / barrister, artist etc.
2. Find out more on these career and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working these careers, Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 career you would like to pursue
5. Explore the entry criteria of relevant subjects in the college
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jacob’s Answer

Choosing a college major is a significant decision, and it's great that you have a variety of interests to explore. Here's a step-by-step approach to help you make a thoughtful decision:

1. **Self-Assessment:** Start by reflecting on your interests, strengths, and long-term goals. What subjects or activities do you feel passionate about? What are your natural talents and skills?

2. **Research Your Interests:**
- Look into each of your potential majors (ceramics, criminal justice, nursing, psychology, early education) in-depth. Understand the coursework, career prospects, and job opportunities associated with each field.

3. **Consider Your Values:**
- Think about your values and what matters most to you in a career. For example, if making a difference in people's lives is crucial, nursing or early education might align with your values.

4. **Talk to Professionals:**
- Reach out to professionals in each field. Conduct informational interviews or job shadowing to get a firsthand understanding of what each career entails.

5. **Explore Your Interests:**
- Take introductory courses or workshops in some of these areas to get a taste of the subjects. Many colleges allow you to explore different fields before declaring a major.

6. **Assess Long-Term Goals:**
- Consider where you see yourself in 5, 10, or 20 years. Which major aligns best with your long-term career aspirations?

7. **Talk to Academic Advisors:**
- Meet with academic advisors at your college or university. They can provide guidance, discuss major requirements, and help you understand the academic pathways.

8. **Evaluate Job Market:**
- Research the job market for each major. What is the demand for professionals in these fields? What is the earning potential? This can help you make a practical choice.

9. **Balance Passion and Practicality:**
- Balance your passion for a subject with practical considerations like job prospects and income potential. Ideally, you want a major that you enjoy and that leads to a satisfying career.

10. **Consider Double Major or Minors:**
- If you find it difficult to choose just one major, explore the possibility of double majoring or minoring in related fields. This allows you to combine your interests.

11. **Follow Your Heart:**
- Ultimately, choose a major that aligns with your passion and interests. When you love what you study, you're more likely to excel and enjoy your college experience.

12. **Stay Open to Change:**
- Remember that your choice of major doesn't lock you into a single career path forever. Many people change careers or pursue further education after their undergraduate degree.

13. **Seek Guidance:**
- Talk to mentors, parents, or trusted individuals about your decision. They can provide valuable insights and perspectives.

14. **Listen to Your Instincts:**
- Sometimes, your gut feeling can guide you in the right direction. Pay attention to which major feels like the best fit for you.

It's completely normal to have multiple interests, and your career path may evolve over time. Your choice of major is a significant step, but it doesn't define your entire career journey. Take your time, explore your options, and trust that you'll make the right decision based on what feels most fulfilling and aligned with your goals and values.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Justin’s Answer

Take the time to speak to people in what you're looking for, learn about the role, what you would be doing, how it takes to get there, and what pathways you can take in that specific area of study. And really try to picture yourself doing those things later in your life. It's easy to pick the wrong major, so take the time to research your interests. People are always willing to answer questions and help.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sarah’s Answer

Hello Eli! It would be beneficial for you to examine the prerequisites for all the majors you're considering and identify which one includes the most subjects that pique your interest. If feasible, try out various classes related to your potential majors to determine if any of them resonate with you more than others. In addition to this, consider your career aspirations post-college and which majors could best equip you for those. Even if you don't have a specific job in mind, contemplate the type of work you'd like to do, including the daily tasks, working hours, salary, and so on. Then, reverse-engineer from there. This approach could prove useful in your decision-making process.
0