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How hard is it to work a 12 hour shift?

I want to be a nurse but im not sure if id be able to work 12 hours straight

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Raquel’s Answer

Pulling a twelve-hour shift can be grueling, but it's something you grow stronger for over time. As a nursing student, you'll probably spend at least one day a week in the hospital, working alongside an experienced nurse for 12 hours. These training days are crucial in preparing you for the three twelve-hour shifts you'll likely work once you graduate and start your career. However, keep in mind that not all nursing roles require 12-hour shifts. Many outpatient positions offer 8-10 hour shifts, and some hospitals even operate on an 8-hour shift system.

Building endurance for these long hours is key, but there are also practical steps you can take to make the experience more manageable. Wearing compression socks and sturdy shoes can protect your feet and legs over time. Stay hydrated and pack light, easy-to-eat snacks! Your shifts will vary, some will be relaxed, and others will be non-stop busy. On those hectic days, having quick, ready-to-eat snacks can help keep your energy levels up.

Eating small snacks throughout your shift, rather than one large meal, can be particularly helpful if you're working night shifts. Night shifts are generally quieter than day shifts as there's less happening in the hospital, making it a good way to ease into long shifts. However, they come with their own unique challenges.
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Doc’s Answer

Hannah the length of a nurse’s work schedule really depends on the healthcare facility and industry in which you work. If you're a floor nurse in a hospital setting, you'd probably be working 12-hour shifts 3-days a week, which is why many people assume nurses always work 12-hour shifts. However, nurses who work outside a hospital setting usually have different work hours. For instances, a school nurse or a nurse who works in a clinic would more likely work an 8-hour shift Monday-Friday.

It's because nursing careers offer such flexible scheduling is why so many choose to become a nurse. Because hospitals, nursing homes and other health centers operate around the clock, many nurses can choose from a variety of shifts. Many nurses prefer to work overnight and have free time during the day, while others want to work weekends and take weekdays off. To boost recruiting and retention, many healthcare centers offer flexible scheduling as a perk. The ability to choose their hours enables nurses to work part-time or return to school for advanced training.

Here are some other reasons Hannah some nurses like to work 12-hour shifts:

• MORE TIME OFF - Instead of the standard two days off per week, you get four days off. Nurses on 12-hour shifts typically work three days a week, and many prefer to run these days consecutively. This four-day gap allows you to recharge and spend more quality time with family and friends.

• LESS COMMUTING - Fewer scheduled days mean less time on the road. Whether you get to work by car or public transportation, you'll save on gas or fares, especially if you have a long commute.

• BETTER PATIENT CARE - Fewer patient handoffs will occur if your team only requires two shift changes daily. That reduces the potential for miscommunication or misunderstanding among team members and errors that could arise as a result.

Nurses are an integral part of the health-care system. Not only do they deliver outstanding care and support to patients and their families, they also advocate on our behalf every single day. They work to make sure we receive the best possible care today and are committed to improving the quality of care that will be available in the future.

Hope this was helpful Hannah
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