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what would be the most difficult part of being a funeral manager?

I don't know anyone who is a funeral manger so i was wondering what would be the cons of being a funeral manager.

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Karin’s Answer

Hi Brandon,

I think that would depend on your temperament and sensibilities.

For some if would be dealing with dead bodies where some might not look/smell so nice any more. Having to prepare people who died in accidents or other violent ways or victims of drowning who have been in the water for a while.

For others it might be comforting grieving family members and all their emotions and the sudden complications they face now.

The worst, I think, would always be children, children who lost a parent and their whole world, children who died and whose whole life was stolen. The parents who have to do what no parent should have to do: bury a child.

It will be difficult to maintainn boundaries (for your own sanity) so you don't take this emotional load home. But if you can do that, and can take comfort in the fact that you were able to give some comfort to a family during a difficult time, it can certainly be a rewarding career.

Good luck!

KP
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Brandon !

This is a very thoughtful question and I would like to offer some advice based on having five funeral directors in my family plus knowing some friends that had that career.

To begin with, the position is Funeral Director. All of the Funeral Directors I knew never have complained about their job or had vicarious trauma from their duties. The position actually gets better as times goes on as when you start out, you will do a variety of things and as you work up to decades of experience, you can do mostly the administrative part and the pay is still great.

Seeing that the field of work is centered around dead bodies, Funeral Directing School will certainly let you know if you could handle it or not, but you should be sure before you go to the expense of school. I would suggest highly to attend any wake or service of a relative or friend. Become familiar with the visuals and various cultural customs. Also, ask a local funeral director if you may shadow him or her for a day. This would give you insight for both the job as well as if you feel called towards doing this. It's helpful to read about it, but getting the real experience will help you make your decision to go into this most needed and appreciated field of work.

If I have to ponder about what would be the most difficult part of funeral directing . . . it would have to be if you own a funeral home and have financial problems. I just have never seen any professional funeral director uncomfortable or intimidated by their work. I admit, I have no idea what inspires one to go into the career, but they all seem to be confident, caring, understanding and compassionate and superb at the business end of it. I've known most of them personally so I can attest that most of them have a keen sense of humor and have lived satisfying lives.

Also, what segment of funeral directing is hard or not liked so much by one funeral director may be the thing you like most, so it's hard to say what would be the most difficult. I can say that it is a very important career and a very thankful career.

I hope this has helped a bit and I wish you all the best in whatever career you choose.
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