25 answers
Asked Viewed 332 times Translate

I'm a marketing major in my 3rd year - but I loved my accounting class! How do I know which to major in?

I am currently a third year student in marketing. I switched to marketing at the beginning of my third year, so the business classes were knew to me. I will be graduating late. I took accounting 1 this fall and I absolutely loved it - which is weird for me to say. I didn't know anything about accounting before this class, so I thought I was going to dread it. It ended up being really "easy" for me since I enjoyed figuring the problems out and didn't mind studying. This was my first college class that I felt this way about. It is making me want to switch my major to accounting. Although, I haven't taken any marketing classes yet. I enjoy marketing partly because I enjoy the free range of job opportunities after undergrad. I like that it is creative and has endless job opportunities that don't all involve a job in a cubicle. I was looking for advice on this decision I have. I definitely need to shadow people in accounting and in marketing, but was also looking for advice on here from anyone! #major #business #college #advisor #accounting #marketing #career #advice #majors #jobs


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
25
100% of 25 Pros

25 answers


Updated Translate

Josie’s Answer

Hi Grace,

Accounting is such a specialized field that you have to major in it in order to get a job in this field most of the time. It is also not until you get into your second or third class of a topic before you realize that it is something you will want to do for any duration of time.

A marketing degree is a great general business degree that is great if you want to go into marketing or sales within a company. Doing internships and shadowing people or even talking with people that have roles in a field you might be interested in is a great way to best understand if it is right for you.



3
100% of 3 Pros
Updated Translate

Louise’s Answer

To add on to what Malkia Morris said, another profession that combines accounting and marketing skills is marketing analytics, where you evaluate the effectiveness of marketing, pricing, etc. by collecting data, analyzing it and then making recommendations.

3
100% of 3 Pros
Updated Translate

Kelli’s Answer

Hi Grace!!

You said "I enjoy the free range of job opportunities after undergrad. I like that it is creative and has endless job opportunities that don't all involve a job in a cubicle." To me, it seems you have intuitively identified what kind of culture or job environment that you would enjoy working in and what you wouldn't (being in a cubicle). You should go to Linkedin.com and search for accounting jobs and see if the day-to-day job duties are something you think you would love 8 hours a day (which is what I would suggest for marketing as well).

No matter what major you choose, there likely will be areas of weaknesses and that doesn't mean the profession isn't for you, but that you should not find a job that focuses on that area a majority of the time (if possible). If you are able, keep taking both marketing and accounting until one becomes the winner (you said you were graduating late already). It may take you a bit longer, but it will be worth it so that you do not have any regrets. (Some people need to go through doors and shut them in order to move on without regrets while others can observe and research and close those doors without regrets. You have to know which type of person you are by looking back at your past behavior.)

All of us have skills and talent: some of us have more than others and some of us have less. Be a continuous learner, which is something that will help you in life and on the job. In the long-run, a few more classes (or YouTube videos explaining what accountants/marketing agents do) won't seem like it was a bad investment of time, imo.

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

John’s Answer

Grace the options for individuals with a marketing degree are diferent than for those with an accounting degree. Each degree has benefits, but determining which provides more opportunities depends on a number of factors, including career goals. Each field requires different skills to be successful. Jobs opportunities for someone with a marketing degree include sales, marketing, public relations and advertising. The options for someone with an accounting degree include bookkeeping, accounting and auditing. More companies hire accounting degree graduates than marketing degree graduates, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

CAREER OUTLOOKS AND SALRY INFORMATION
MARKETING SPECIALIST – The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts growth of jobs in both these degree fields. Marketing jobs are expected to grow 13% through the year 2028, while accounting jobs should expand 22%. Some 279,000 accounting jobs will be available, especially for those with professional certification such as certified public accountants (CPA), compared to 80,000 new marketing jobs. The average Marketing Specialist salary in the United States is $70,500 as of November 25, 2020, but the range typically falls between $60,000 and $80,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS – For public accountants, you can start work in the field and then take the CPA exam and earn your licensure. You may also work as an auditor. Once your foot is in the door, your accounting experience will open many new career opportunities to you. Whether you want to work in a public or private accounting firm, you'll be able to explore ways to advance your career based on the sector you work in, any specialization you have, and your interests. From there, you are more likely to qualify for managerial and senior positions, which will come with more responsibilities and a higher paycheck. Career advancement for accountants in the private sector starts off much like those in the public sector, since you'll find positions early on as a general accountant or auditor. The average Accountant salary in the United States is $82,900 as of November 25, 2020, but the range typically falls between $76,000 and $90,500. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS – Becoming a CPA will take time. The steps to becoming a CPA involves a 4-year undergraduate degree, as well as getting 30 additional credit hours over the course of one year. Most states also require two years of work experience. All this adds up to a 7-year process if you do it full time. Part-time it will take you longer. Certified public accountants in public practice provide compliance, consulting, and advisory services to clients in various industries, helping individuals and organizations with their financial planning and reporting, taxes, investments, and mergers and acquisitions. A CPA in the corporate world is part of the corporation's management team, usually taking responsibility for financial management or internal auditing. The average salary for someone with a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) in the United States is between $112,500 and $461,000 as of November 25, 2020,

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Tania’s Answer

I don't know much about marketing but I know a lot about bookkeeping/accounting. This industry has changed drastically compared to what is being taught in school. With the advance of cloud accounting there are a lot of fun apps to discover so you increase automation as well as turn more into a trusted advisor for your clients. There are a lot of opportunities for accounting in a non-traditional way. Someone else mentioned you could also combine the 2 and help a firm who wants to move toward cloud how to market and what offerings they could provide. Also, remember that what you decide isn't a lifetime commitment. I started in law, went to administration, then bookkeeping (running my own firm) and now into corporate sales. Sometimes the journey getting to your final destination can be quite amazing :).

0
Updated Translate

Simeon’s Answer

I'd say that you need to take other accounting classes, especially more advanced ones, to get a better sense for if it's a good fit. Most introductory accounting classes are going to be fairly fun and approachable because it is a required course for most business degrees. Also, if you decide to go down the accounting path, there are grueling exams (especially CPA) to study for post-graduation if you want to continue on in accounting. I'd recommend looking up the CPA requirements to get the quickest sense for if you want to do accounting. Plus, if you don't want to be in a cubicle all day, accounting is not the best way to avoid that. There are a lot of opportunities down the accounting path, but it's important to know the cost you'll have to pay to get there.

0
Updated Translate

Kristina’s Answer

Hi, I know that many people struggle with determining a major, so I wanted to give some general advice. I think the biggest focus when picking a major should be the job opportunities in the field. It is important to take a look at the potential jobs you can get after college and throughout your career in each field and determine what you think will fit you best. I recommend speaking with as many people in the fields as possible, doing research, job shadowing, applying for internships, etc. Ultimately it is important to look for a career that will make you happy and help you meet your personal and professional goals. From there, I would make sure the education required for the degree is also something interesting enough to keep you focused and motivated. Best of luck!

0
Updated Translate

Krishna’s Answer

Hi Grace!

Great questions! There are many pros to both marketing and accounting majors. It is very true that marketing will give you more of a broad range of options in terms of businesses and types of work you can get involved in, including more analytical roles that include fundamentals of accounting. This could include a marketing analytics position or data analytics position. Accounting is a very technical field and will require proper education undergrad and a master's to get enough credits for a CPA. I suggest you take a few more accounting classes and marketing classes to better understand the fields. If the accounting classes truly are interesting to you, you can switch your major or maybe even try to double major. College is the time to learn and figure out what you are passionate about. Use this opportunity to learn your inner strengths.

Hope this helps!

0
Updated Translate

Lea’s Answer

I was a business major and ended up working for an accounting firm and becoming a CPA. I also was interested in marketing before getting an internship with a big accounting firm. What drew me to accounting in the end was actually the flexibility in job options! I ended up being a tax consultant, traveling about 25% of the time to client sites and advising clients on tax issues to help them reinvest in R&D and get tax benefits for that.

Follow your interest and the jobs will be there - whether in marketing or accounting. Both are great options. Shadowing or interning is a great way to get a real feel for the job itself, and like others have said, looking on LinkedIn for jobs in the field can give you a sense of what is out there.

0
Updated Translate

Kenny’s Answer

Hi Grace,

I was in a similar position while I was in undergrad. I initially went to school for real estate since my university had a great program. However, when I started to take the general accounting classes I felt the same way you did. I liked what I was doing, I didn't mind studying for the class, and things came "easy" to me. I would say to compare how you feel when taking both classes and see which you prefer. As well as getting some sort of experience from both professions to see what that is like. If you start to notice that you like one more than the other, go with what you prefer.

I ended up getting my degree in accounting and I'm currently working at a firm. I'm also starting my masters and plan to become a CPA after that.
Good luck!

0
Updated Translate

Yasemin’s Answer

Hi Grace! I don't have too much information on both majors, but the answers provided are definitely points to think about. I would also like to add in addition to shadowing to take maybe a couple more classes in accounting to be sure of it! Sometimes one or two classes can seem fun and easy but with any major/career choice there are bound to be some difficulties. So just to be sure become more immersed in it to see if you would maybe like to switch over.

I wish you the best!

0
Updated Translate

Tammy’s Answer

Hi Grace!

A lot of great advice from everyone on here so far. When I was in college, I also thought about switching my major from Corporate Finance & Accounting to Actuarial in my 3rd year. I had taken several accounting classes by this time and a couple of math courses that were meant to prepare actuarial majors for their actuarial exams. In addition to the advice given to you already, here is some advice I would like to pass on to you that ultimately helped me make my decision:

1. Meet with an academic advisor at your school and express your interest in both majors. I was a peer academic advisor at my college and my role was to help students figure out which major may suit them based on their interests and goals for a career. An academic advisor will ask you some thought provoking questions to help you think through your options. They will also be able to give you some insight into what topics your future accounting or marketing classes will cover. This can help you determine which major sparks your interests more.

2. Meet with a career services advisor at your school. A career services advisor will be able to share some insight into what career opportunities there are in both accounting and marketing. There are definitely careers in accounting that will allow you to tap into your creativity side especially with advancements in technology that are changing the way we work (i.e. artificial intelligence, robotic process automation, etc). They will also be able to share some companies that recruit from your college and companies that students from your school have started their career with after graduation. From this, you will be able to do some individual research on these companies and find job descriptions posted on their website to determine which field may interest you more.

Feel free to reach out to me directly if you have any questions about an accounting career! I am currently working at a big 4 public accounting firm and have had the opportunity to explore various services that our firm provides to our clients that allowed me to tap into both my analytical and creative side. My contact information is on my profile and I would be happy to answer any additional questions you may have.

Be well,
Tammy


0
Updated Translate

Andrea’s Answer

Hello! A class in accounting and a profession solely in accounting are two different things. I work for PwC in their Marketing & Sales Department. So I do marketing/sales/account management, but I work with accounting teams. To me, this is the best of both worlds! If you like marketing but also have an interest in accounting, it may be beneficial to look into a hybrid position. This way you are working with accounting folks, but are also using the core marketing skills you learned in your major. Hope this helps!

0
Updated Translate

Alison’s Answer

Hi Grace!

It's great that you've found areas that you love in both marketing and accounting! I actually thought I wanted to major in accounting but switched to focusing on marketing later on. I would agree with other advice here on exploring these subjects more in-depth through classes and meeting with an advisor.

I would recommend you reaching out to alumni or others you may know in the industry. They can help give you a first-hand look into what they do and help guide you when making your decision. It's also a great way to build your network when looking for jobs/internships.

I'd also say that there's elements of accounting/finance I use in marketing, especially when planning & managing budgets throughout the year. If you enjoyed the problem-solving aspect of accounting, there's definitely areas to apply those skills in marketing. Good luck!

0
Updated Translate

Cameron’s Answer

Hi Grace. I had a similar issue deciding which major to pursue in college and ultimately went with accounting.

I would suggest you continue to take both accounting and marketing courses to identify which you think is the better option for you. Typically these classes will both count toward your business school requirements so they shouldn't be wasted time when you choose a specific business major or double major.

I would also potentially suggest taking extra classes next semester in accounting and marketing instead of general education classes in order to more quickly identify the major you think you would prefer.

Best of luck with your decision-- either way you can't go wrong! Happy holidays!

Cameron recommends the following next steps:

Enroll in additional marketing and accounting courses as soon as possible

0
Updated Translate

Brittany’s Answer

Hey Grace! It's so great that you've found a passion in multiple fields within business! Marketing is such a great major with a lot of career mobility and transferrable skills associated with it. Depending on what you want your job to be post-graduation, your major doesn't necessarily define your career path. My suggestion would be to take an additional accounting class or two (perhaps an upper-level class) to see if this is something you are truly passionate about before switching majors. Even if you don't switch your major, you can still take those accounting classes and draw upon your experience in said classes to pursue a career that incorporates elements of both majors. There are plenty of opportunities within the marketing field where you can incorporate your passion for numbers.

0
Updated Translate

Blake’s Answer

You are still young. If accounting has your heart, maybe sign up for another accounting course and modify your schedule so your electives will count as accounting courses as well. If after the semester you choose to switch then go for it. Don't settle for a path just because you chose it while being younger. Part of college is seeing where you want to go with life and its rare people figure it out first try. If you have to give up another year to finish your college degree in accounting, then so be it. Do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life.

0
Updated Translate

Diksha’s Answer

Hi, Grace!

I graduated from my university as an Accounting major with a Marketing minor so I understand where you are coming from. I suggest getting a LinkedIn and networking with professionals in both the accounting and marketing fields and analyze whether you would want to pursue that path.

I would also suggest taking a couple more classes in both marketing and accounting to see which one you would prefer. I would also suggest speaking to your Academic Advisor and seeking their advise if you were thinking of switching majors or adding minors.

Wishing you the best of luck!

0
Updated Translate

Jennifer’s Answer

I would take a few more accounting classes and see if you are still interested. In addition, if you have the opportunity to do so at your school, attend any virtual presentations by potential employers (in this case, accounting firms), so that you can hear what they have to say about working at their firms and what type of opportunities there are for accounting majors. Also, if you know anyone who works in an accounting firm right now, or your school has a career day type of event where you can speak to alumni who are working as accountants, it would be good to talk to them about any specific questions you have.

0
Updated Translate

Malkia’s Answer

Hi,

There are opportunities in accounting where you can combine both marketing and accounting. For example, Purchasing and Inventory Control. Also you, could work as a project manager or content manager that will allow you to apply both disciplines. Accounting is great supplement to almost any field that you have an interest.

Malkia recommends the following next steps:

Definitely check out the occupational handbook for additional ideas and information.

0
Updated Translate

Sunny’s Answer

Hi Grace,

It is great that you found your interest in accounting. I also enjoyed my first accounting class and it helped me come this far.

It might be a good idea to take two or more classes next semester while you are studying for marketing. Accounting 1 usually includes journal entries and financial statements in the course and that is a small part of accountant's jobs. Accounting field is very broad. You can become an auditor, tax accountant, tax attorney, government officer, international accountants, corporate accountants, CFO, etc. Auditors have more travel opportunities, so if you do not like to work in a cubicle, that can be one of your options.

I hope this helps.

Happy Holidays!

0
Updated Translate

Alekxis’s Answer

Hi Grace!
To echo a lot of the other responses above it is great that you have found interest in multiple fields. I wonder if it is possible at your school to try other business classes? If so I would recommend doing so to see if you like any others just as much. Perhaps in taking more marketing and accounting classes you may also find you like one more than the other as they become more niche. I also wonder if perhaps your school offers a general business degree or a management degree that may touch various parts of the business world - always something to consider!

Accounting is also a much more specific degree which generally requires more courses if you are going to become a CPA and may also less room for exploring other business areas depending on your school requirements. When I make decisions similar to this I tend to make an old fashion pros/cons list and physically seeing my thoughts written down tends to help me.

Goodluck!

0
Updated Translate

Alina’s Answer

Hi Grace! I can relate to your reaction in the first accounting class as I had a similar experience when I was a Finance major. I took Intro to Financial Accounting as a freshman and was surprised that it came so naturally to me. I ended up adding Accounting as a dual major and that was the career path I ultimately chose, in part because I graduated college during the 2008 financial crisis and finance jobs took a huge hit while demand for accounting remained strong. Depending on the requirements at your college, it may be feasible to major in both if you are still unsure after taking additional accounting classes and starting your marketing curriculum.

Though accounting is a much more technical field than marketing, there are tons of opportunities that can be very different within the profession. For example, would you want to work in public accounting (at a firm and pursuing a CPA license) or at a specific company (commonly referred to as "going into industry" or "going private" in the accounting world)? The answer to this question is largely driven by your career aspirations, as many new job entrants get several years of experience in public accounting before moving into the private sphere as the public experience tends to broaden your options. Alternatively (and much less commonly), people stay in public accounting to make partner at a firm, where they essentially own a part of the business and are responsible for its operations, especially business development and marketing additional services to new and existing clients. The more experience you have and the more you move up the career ladder, the more likely it is that your role will require broader business skills.

The accounting profession has changed drastically in the last several years through digital automation and even starting to incorporate Artificial Intelligence. I find that many of the new joiners at my firm are able to use data automation and visualization tools to avoid much of the notorious "grunt work" that so often used to plague new associates in public accounting. There are also many different technical options within accounting itself. Most commonly in public accounting this is a choice between audit and tax, but there are many, many specializations beyond that as well as other fields such as risk assurance that may require data analytics or other specialized skills.

You are definitely on the right track to shadow professionals in both accounting and marketing to help you decide what these types of jobs realistically entail on a day-to-day basis. A class in college is not always representative of what that field is like in the workplace. Best of luck!

0
Updated Translate

Michelle’s Answer

Hi Grace!

You've gotten some good advice so far! I would echo this point from others very strongly: take classes in both accounting and marketing before you make any decisions. I actually had a pretty similar experience to what you're describing. I was a marketing and strategy concentration, but I was shocked to discover that I LOVED my first accounting class. Then I took another... Accounting is a language. My introductory class was learning basic vocabulary, maybe stringing some sentences together. (Yours may be similar, maybe not.) Then I took the next level, and suddenly it was like reading novels in a foreign language with all these grammatical rules that I couldn't make heads or tails of, and I realized I did not, in fact, like accounting very much at all.

You may have a very different experience. Your introductory accounting class may be more advanced than mine was; you may continue to love accounting. Like all new things, we don't have a very good grasp about what a field of study is all about when we're just getting started. As a marketing major, your time wouldn't be wasted by taking another accounting class or two before you make a decision (check with your academic advisor to make sure this will keep you on track with your overall plan). If you choose to stick with marketing, you'll probably have times when you have to manage a budget, track expenses or--especially if you go the product management or marketing analytics route as Louise suggested--do financial analysis for a product or opportunity. If you go the accounting route, having a few marketing classes will help you understand business strategy that will give you good perspective as an accountant. Either way, take some time to decide and you'll come to the right decision.

0
Updated Translate

Victoria’s Answer

Hi,

Great question! I also majored in accounting and marketing - there is a lot of potential here but you will need to do some due diligence to figure out what exactly you'd narrow your career search to.

Life is a journey where you try things out, evaluate if it is for you and then make decisions based on your experience. Another added level of complexity is that you yourself will also change and what your interests and values are at one point may change and the job that you thought was meant for you no longer is. The bottom line is the idea of something being meant for you is a goal that is unrealistic. Instead reserve time for introspection to figure out what you want in life, career, etc and figure out what your strengths and weaknesses are, tie those together and figure out what careers align with such - this will set you up with more alignment in what you want that may not be something you are conscious of and tie it to a career.

Figure out what your life goals are (ie. work to fund your hobbies, work as your hobby)
Figure out what you want to learn from a job, what you value in a job
Figure out what your strengths and weaknesses are
Figure out what jobs align with your personal abilities and your personal & professional goals
Figure out what opportunities are closely available to you (ie. school network, campus recruiting, personal connections, etc)

0