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how did your career start?

what were your overall grades in college and how much work did you do in college.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Susan’s Answer

In college, I excelled academically, earning top marks while double majoring in international relations and government. However, for over a quarter of a century, my professional journey has taken me into the realm of technology. This experience taught me that your college major doesn't necessarily have to match your future career. After all, it's quite common to be unsure about your career path upon graduation, and it's also normal for your interests to evolve over time.

So, my advice to you is to concentrate on studying what you truly enjoy in college, rather than fretting over how your major will translate into a career or income. When you're passionate about your studies, you're likely to perform better academically. Plus, following your passion can often guide you towards the career path that's right for you after graduation.
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Jasmin’s Answer

When I was young I knew for sure I wanted to be a lawyer. Then I joined the Army Cadets and was sure I wanted to be in the Army. I didn't go to university when I left school, I went into the Army and worked as a logistics operator. I soon realized I would get bored in that role and applied to become an officer in the Army. It took a lot of determination and fighting against bureaucracy, but my application was accepted and I went and did the officer training in the Royal Military College.
As an officer cadet, you put in preferences and are then allocated your career, I got my second choice of Signals. This put me in the technology field, learning about networking, combat net radios, satellite and other bearer systems. I then went and was posted into a bunch of roles. Everything from leading soldiers who specialise in radio communications to telecommunications planning for large multinational exercises to an executive assistant to a General.
As I progressed in my career, I decided to change stream to Intelligence, and after another long bureaucratic process, I transferred to Intelligence and undertook the officer basic course. It was the most difficult thing I have done in my life that made me completely question my worth, value and intelligence as a person. But I came out the other side and gained a whole other level of resilience. I was posted into a cyber security operations role and played a huge role in protecting people on operations overseas which was incredibly rewarding. I then deployed in another role as the security operations 2IC in charge of force protection in Egypt to monitor the peace treaty in the Sinai between Israel and Egypt.
After 12 years in the Army, a lot of different experiences in all sorts of roles from operations, project management, logistics, telecommunications planning, I left the Army to become a consultant. I did that for three years and then applied for a Security Operations role in Microsoft. I'm currently a program manager working on implementing a global data management and business intelligence system for an area of the business.
I still don't "know what I want to be when I grow up." I didn't study originally after leaving school, but ended up completing my

BUT, my point is if you are curious, determined, keen to learn new skills and prepared to take on new opportunities then your career can take you in so many directions you would have never expected.

Jasmin recommends the following next steps:

Think about what problems you enjoy solving
Work out what qualifications or experience you need to work on the problems you like solving
Be curious and willing to put in the work, fail fast and learn from it
Repeat!
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. Many students have similar question. Have your thought about what career you have interest?
Below are my suggestions :
1. Think about what you have interest, e.g. your hobbies, favourite subjects, etc. and identify the related careers
E.g. If you like music, would you like to be a singer, music producer, musician, music composer, musical artist, etc.
If you have interest in maths, would you like to be an accountant, engineer, financial analyst, banker, maths teacher, etc.
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. See k guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 careers you would like to pursue
5. Explore the ensure criteria of relevant subjects in the college
6. After you gradate from the college and start working in the industry, you can prepare long term career plan. You can breakdown into some short term milestones and review the progress on regularly.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Nicole’s Answer

When I was in university, I started working as an intern in my favorite industry. That period did good to my career development and helped me to adapt to the society and determined the general orientation. So do cherish each opportunity of internship.
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Chuqi’s Answer

I'm truly thankful for opting for numerous project-based classes alongside the mandatory ones during college as a computer science major. The projects I undertook in these classes significantly helped my transition from being a programming student to a proficient programmer. These projects imparted valuable lessons on successful project planning and effective collaboration with team members, both of which were instrumental in kick-starting my career as a software engineer. Therefore, I firmly believe that gaining some hands-on project experience and possessing the ability to articulate it can substantially help your career start.
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Cristian’s Answer

Throughout my school years, I consistently topped my class until I ventured into college. It was here that I discovered life extends beyond the mere digits on a report card. The most crucial task is to focus on your own growth and build a life that brings you joy and fulfillment.

As time passes, I guarantee that your grades will lose their significance. Instead, people will value and remember you for your actions and how you made them feel. If you are a person filled with kindness and empathy, I can confidently say that you'll experience immense personal and professional growth, far more than if you were just a bookworm lacking social skills. Thus, I urge you to step out and live the most enriching life you can. Stay grounded, select your friends thoughtfully as you will inevitably mirror the traits of your closest five friends.
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Helen’s Answer

As I was studying Finance and Economics for my Masters degree, I knew I wanted to work in the Finance/Banking industry or a Finance role in a global commercial organisation. I started looking for graduate programs during my last year of studying and applied for as many as possible that would give me an interview opportunity. Fortunately I managed to land a graduate role in Finance at IBM and that's how my career started.
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