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How can I manage life and work?

How do I have a successful life, while getting to do what I love with who I love?How can I work long shifts, raise my future kids, and keep my friendships, and have a happy wife with the long hours?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Viv’s Answer

I think it's important to try to work with companies who have great work-life balance to begin with, but there are definitely some careers where long-hours are unavoidable. It's good to establish boundaries with work where you can. For example, not answering emails after hours, making sure to take off work to go to special events or on vacation, and having dedicated weekly time to spend with your family. You'll have to do your best to plan and communicate how to balance your life to prioritize your time with friends and family.
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Abigail’s Answer

Work-life balance is a challenge that I'll feel that I've mastered, but then it returns every couple of years. I find it helpful to focus on keeping my work hours as focused and productive as possible, rather than adding more work hours.
Working with music can keep me engaged if I'm doing something repetitive, but if I'm doing more creative work, I tend to focus best by keeping my environment quiet. I also love keeping a checklist to prioritize urgent tasks.
To keep work hours from running over, I like to leave at the same time every day. My coworkers know to expect my departure at that time, which allows for wrapping up conversations quickly.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. It really depends on how do you view on success. Different people have different view on success. Perhaps you can consider to find a career you have interest first. Work in a career you have interest you may have a more chance to success.
Below are my suggestions:
1. Think about what you have interest, eg your hobbies, favourite subjects, etc and identify the related careers
Eg if you have interest in maths, would you like to be an accountant, engineer, banker, financial analyst, maths teacher, etc
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counselor, your parents, etc
4. Shortlist 1-2 career you would like to pursue
5. Explore the entry criteria of relevant subjects in the college
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Ganesh’s Answer

It's truly heartening to see you pondering over the million-dollar question that has been the center of attention for many corporations and organizations, their employees, and engagement advocates. I am glad that you're contemplating this early in your career rather than later, when the impact might already be felt. Drawing from my own experiences, I will try to provide some insights in two key areas - managing work and maintaining balance. I won't presume to advise you on managing your life :)

When it comes to managing work, time management stands as a cornerstone. By simply planning your day ahead, utilizing tools as basic as calendars and task trackers in Outlook, and adhering to your work plan, you're already halfway to success.

Another crucial aspect is managing expectations. It's vital to set accurate expectations with your employers regarding work allocation. Be transparent about your capabilities and boundaries, and ensure that your commitments are realistic and achievable. Often, in the initial stages of a job, we tend to overcommit in an attempt to impress, which can backfire once the initial enthusiasm fades. Committing to feasible timelines and delivering on them is key in setting the right expectations. Equally important is learning to professionally decline tasks that infringe on your personal time.

Selecting a career path that engages you and offers constant learning opportunities can greatly support work-life balance by significantly reducing work-related stress.

When it comes to maintaining balance, some people pride themselves on not taking any paid time off, but I view this as a fast track to burnout. Labor agreements exist for a reason. Even if organizations offer to pay you for unused vacation time, I firmly believe it's healthier to take the vacation than to end up spending that money on medical bills. In my experience, work efficiency often improves after a break, enabling you to complete tasks more quickly upon return. Don't feel as though the entire organization's weight is on your shoulders, regardless of what your superiors might suggest. Everyone is replaceable and work will continue in your absence, albeit with a slight delay. Don't feel compelled to work during your personal time or bring work into your bedroom. Once you clock out, leave work behind and don't let it consume the rest of your day.

Lastly, find a non-work-related activity that you're truly passionate about, such as traveling, reading, or music. There's nothing quite like the joy of spending time on something you love. Wishing you a successful career and a fulfilling life!

Reference:
Time Management: https://timeular.com/blog/time-management-matrix/
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