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How often do patients fail to comply to the necessary needs of their health provided from the Registered Nurse?

How often do patients fail to comply to the necessary needs of their health provided by the Registered Nurse?

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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Jajuane,

Patients’ Compliance with the Necessary Needs of Health Provided by Registered Nurses

The frequency of patients failing to comply with the necessary health needs provided by Registered Nurses can vary significantly depending on various factors. Some studies suggest that non-adherence to medical advice or prescribed treatments ranges from 30% to 50% of patients. However, this number can be higher or lower depending on the specific population, condition, and treatment regimen.

Several reasons contribute to patients not adhering to their prescribed health needs:

Lack of understanding: Patients may not fully comprehend the importance or instructions related to their treatment, leading to non-compliance.
Side effects: Some medications or treatments may cause unpleasant side effects, causing patients to discontinue them without consulting their healthcare provider.
Cost: Affordability of medications and treatments can be a significant barrier to adherence, especially for those without insurance or with high out-of-pocket expenses.
Complex treatment regimens: Patients may struggle to manage multiple medications, appointments, or therapies, leading to non-compliance.
Lifestyle factors: Busy schedules, lack of support from family or friends, and personal beliefs can all impact a patient’s ability to follow through with their prescribed care.

To address this issue, healthcare providers, including Registered Nurses, often employ various strategies to improve patient adherence, such as:

Clear communication: Ensuring patients understand their treatment plan, including the reasons for it and any potential side effects.
Patient education: Providing resources and support to help patients better manage their condition and treatment.
Simplifying treatment regimens: When possible, consolidating medications or appointments to make them more manageable for the patient.
Monitoring and follow-up: Regularly checking in with patients to assess their progress, address concerns, and make necessary adjustments to their care plan.
Collaborative care: Involving other healthcare professionals, such as pharmacists, social workers, and therapists, to address various aspects of a patient’s care and support their adherence.

In conclusion, the frequency of patients failing to comply with the necessary health needs provided by Registered Nurses can vary widely, but it is a common issue in healthcare. Healthcare providers continually work to improve patient adherence through various strategies and interventions.

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James Constantine Frangos.
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Hwal’s Answer

Jajuanae,

I see you tagged medicine and doctor. I'm a family medicine PA and, as a licensed medical professional who diagnoses and treats health conditions for patients of all ages, I can share that patient non-adherence to treatment plan, including medication and non-medication therapies and counselling, is quite common. In fact, it's common enough that I've learned to be well prepared to address non-adherence in a way that best supports each patient's autonomy and dignity, as well as their health and safety. Believe it or not, this is one of the things that makes medicine interesting and stimulating for me, because often, if not always, the patient and I get to deepen our trust in each other in the course of the conversation about the reasons for non-adherence.

I hope this is helpful. Let me know if you have any specific questions I can help with.

Hwal
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Jajuanae !

You have asked such an insightful question and even though I have never been a nurse, I would like to shed some insight for you based on my experience as an intensive social service Case Manager, for many, many years, working with heavy medical clients.

To begin with, I worked in various venues: community based social service organizations, nursing homes, transitional housing as well as homeless services. As a whole, about 98% of my clients had physical or mental health disabilities and/or rehabbed and/or active substance abuse at varying levels. I also have ten years training in Deaf Services as a hearing case manager and provided services to the deaf. I was interacting with nurses, medical doctors, physician assistants, social workers, drug rehab professionals as part of my responsibilities. As a Case Manager for these clients, I closely would oversee their compliance with their medical plans. I would say that about 90% of my particular clients over my career were compliant. It's an individual thing for the patient and also depends on your organizations' guidelines for the specific case management program. But nursing is different and I hope an RN can contribute advice here.

Most of the scenarios that I have observed with patients not being in agreement with their medical or psychiatric plan of care were part of the patient's right to choose. Most of the programs I worked with continued to work with the client regardless and sometimes, through the provision of counseling, clients will change their minds. But they have to be ready to change their mind and well informed. At times it would be difficult and I'd have to regretfully discharge clients from community based specific programs if their disagreement was harmful to others or themselves and they were not self-directing or logical. But I do have to say, most of my clients followed medical recommendations from their medical team.

I think it depends on a person's circumstances, trust level, knowledge of health and how ready they are to accept change through advancement. When they do not agree, it is clearly documented in detail. It also depends on what the illness is, too. And hospitals have very clear guidelines around if a patient refuses something so you would be trained in the hospital as an RN on what the protocol is for that particular hospital.

To conclude, it was my experience that most of what I observed is that most people want to get better so they follow the instructions from their nurse and doctor. You will definitely be trained in how to manage non-compliance as a nurse and it is great that you are thinking about this now as it is one of the things you will encounter.

I hope this sheds some light on things and I wish you all the best with your studies and career !
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the help. jajuanae
Thank you comment icon You're welcome, Jajuanae ! I am glad to help ! Michelle M.
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