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What are things i should look at and learn before pursuing teaching?

What are things i should look at and learn before pursuing teaching?

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James Constantine’s Answer

Hi Lillie!

Before you dive headfirst into the world of teaching, there are some key things you should know and learn. First and foremost, it's super important to really know your stuff. This means not only understanding the subject you're going to teach but also being able to break down tricky concepts so your students can grasp them. Plus, getting a handle on the ins and outs of educational psychology and teaching methods is a must. This covers understanding different ways students learn, how to manage a classroom, and the best strategies for teaching. It's also a good idea to get to know the tech tools that can make your lessons even better. Besides, getting some real-world experience through internships or volunteering in schools can give you a sneak peek into what teaching is really like.

On top of that, honing your communication and people skills is key for teachers. You'll need to be able to chat effectively with students, their parents, and your fellow teachers. Plus, being empathetic, patient, and able to connect with a diverse bunch of students is crucial for making your classroom a welcoming place for everyone.

It's also important to get your head around the behind-the-scenes stuff in education. This includes understanding curriculum standards, how to assess students, and the legal stuff teachers need to know. Make sure you're familiar with the rules and regulations of the school or district where you're planning to work.

Staying in the loop with the latest trends and issues in education is also a good move. This means keeping an eye on new teaching methods, educational research, and any policy changes that could affect teaching.

Lastly, take some time to think about why you want to be a teacher and whether you've got the passion and commitment this job requires. Teaching can be both super rewarding and challenging, so it's important to know what you're getting into.

Here are the top 3 go-to resources for all things education:

National Education Association (NEA) - nea.org
American Educational Research Association (AERA) - aera.net
The Chronicle of Higher Education - chronicle.com

May your teaching journey be filled with blessings and success!
James.
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Noopur’s Answer

You can develop your communication skills. You also should pat attention to how you interact with people younger than you. Based on your temperament and subject knowledge you can decide on the age group you want to teach. Professional life also involves many other things for example your connection to your colleagues and some management. For any profession you have to have trust in yourself in your ability to learn and improve and become better and better.
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Harmony’s Answer

If you are planning to teach primary school, I recommend some reading about the specific age range you will be working with and their developmental progress at at that age. You may find some great second hand text books on child psychology. This may help especially working with very young children by shedding light on the depth of ideas they can grasp at their age, and can give you insight into how you approach describing concepts to them.
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Aditi’s Answer

Hey Lillie, LOVE that you're interested in teaching. I think a good first step is to pinpoint WHO you'd like to teach - nursery, pre-k, kindergarten, elementary, middle, high school, college and out-of-school tutoring programs are all vastly different, and demand varied needs. I'm sure you can find content online from teachers at each of these levels, or maybe talk to teachers you personally know to ask (a) what skills have helped them the most (b) what skills they DIDN'T have when they started, that they wish they'd developed. Goof luck!
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