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What are some jobs someone can do that doesn't require going to college?

This was just a question that I have because I'm curious.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Dina’s Answer

College is one path toward landing a career, but there are many other ways to get a solid job.

Start with asking yourself about your interests and hobbies. Consider questions such as “what do I do in my free time?” or “do I have any language, technical, or computer skills?” or “what do I enjoy?”

Most interests can turn into a job with the right support. You may need to develop you interests by learning about it online or refining your skills.

If you are looking into turning a hobby into a job, you’ll probably want to learn about running a small business.

Here are some examples of jobs that don’t require going to college:

Electrician
Interpreter
Dog walker
Gardener
Cosmetologist
Photographer
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Pasquale’s Answer

There are several careers that don't require a college degree and can still provide a stable financial support. Here are some examples: 1. **Trade Skills**: Electricians, plumbers, and HVAC technicians often learn through apprenticeships or vocational schools. These careers can be lucrative and in high demand. 2. **Technology and IT**: Many tech jobs, including web development and IT support, can be entered with certifications or self-taught skills rather than a degree. 3. **Sales**: Many sales positions do not require a degree, and success depends more on skills and experience. Earnings can be significant, especially in high-value industries. 4. **Real Estate**: Becoming a real estate agent typically requires passing a licensing exam rather than a college degree. Real estate can be highly profitable based on commission. 5. **Emergency Services**: Careers in firefighting or law enforcement often require academy training but not necessarily a college degree. 6. **Entrepreneurship**: Starting your own business doesn't require a formal education and can be highly rewarding, though it carries its own risks. 7. **Art and Design**: Many artists, designers, and photographers are self-taught or learn through non-academic courses. 8. **Transportation**: Jobs in transportation, like truck driving or train conducting, often require specific licenses but not college degrees. 9. **Culinary Arts**: Chefs and bakers often start their careers through apprenticeships or culinary schools, which are different from traditional college degrees. 10. **Military Service**: The military offers career opportunities and training in various fields, and it can also provide educational benefits. Each of these careers has its own paths for advancement and can provide a sustainable livelihood without the need for a traditional four-year college degree.
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Pamela’s Answer

Hello Savannah
The Fact Sheet: The American Jobs Plan /The White House
Extremely Important!! Plan Ahead Millenniums for the future!
Remember choose what your happiness and passion is to enjoy a successful career what God's plan are for you.
Whitehouse.gov
Always share and help someone else
There are many jobs that do not require a college degree.
I am praying with you.
Some options include : Truck driver, Construction worker, HVAC technicians, and carpenters go through apprenticeships, plumbing, or electrical work, Real estate agent, Customer service representative, Cosmetologists, Medical assistance

Invest in Workforce Development:
As more Americans rejoin the workforce or seek out new opportunities in a changing economy, there is a greater need for skills development opportunities for workers of all kind. In order to ensure workers have ready access to the skills they will need to succeed, and to improve racial and gender equity, President Biden is calling on Congress to invest $100 billion in proven workforce development programs targeted at underserved groups and getting our students on paths to careers before they graduate from high school.

Pair job creation efforts with next generation training programs. President Biden is calling on Congress to invest in evidence-based approaches to supporting workers. This includes wraparound services, income supports, counseling, and case management, paired with high-quality training and effective partnerships between educational institutions, unions, and employers. Specifically, he is calling for a $40 billion investment in a new Dislocated Workers Program and sector-based training. This funding will ensure comprehensive services for workers, who have lost jobs through no fault of their own, to gain new skills and to get career services they need with in-demand jobs. Sector-based training programs will be focused on growing, high demand sectors such as clean energy, manufacturing, and caregiving, helping workers of all kinds to find good-quality jobs in an ever-changing economy.
Target workforce development opportunities in underserved communities. Structural racism and persistent economic inequities have undermined opportunity for millions of workers. All of the investments in workforce training will prioritize underserved communities and communities hit hard by a transforming economy. President Biden also will call upon Congress to ensure that new jobs created in clean energy, manufacturing, and infrastructure are open and accessible to women and people of color. President Biden is calling on Congress to also specifically target funding to workers facing some of the greatest challenges, with a $12 billion investment. This includes $5 billion over eight years in support of evidence-based community violence prevention programs. He is calling on Congress to invest in job training for formerly incarcerated individuals and justice-involved youth and in improving public safety. He also is calling on Congress to tackle long-term unemployment and underemployment through a new subsidized jobs program. And, he is calling on Congress to eliminate sub-minimum wage provisions in section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act and expand access to competitive, integrated employment opportunities and fair wages for workers with disabilities.

Build the capacity of the existing workforce development and worker protection systems. The United States has underinvested in the workforce development system for decades. In fact, we currently spend just one-fifth of the average that other advanced economies spend on workforce and labor market programs. This lack of investment impacts all of us: better educated workers create spillover effects for other workers and lack of employment has negative social impacts on communities. President Biden is calling on Congress to invest a combined $48 billion in American workforce development infrastructure and worker protection.

This includes registered apprenticeships and pre-apprenticeships, creating one to two million new registered apprenticeships slots, and strengthening the pipeline for more women and people of color to access these opportunities through successful pre-apprenticeship programs such as the Women in Apprenticeships in Non-Traditional Occupations. This will ensure these underserved groups have greater access to new infrastructure jobs. These investments include the creation of career pathway programs in middle and high schools, prioritizing increased access to computer science and high-quality career and technical programs that connect underrepresented students to STEM and in-demand sectors through partnerships with both institutions of higher education and employers. The President’s plan also will support community college partnerships that build capacity to deliver job training programs based on in-demand skills. His plan will better tailor services to workers’ job seeking and career development needs through investments in Expanded Career Services and the Title II adult literacy program. The President’s plan includes funding to strengthen the capacity of our labor enforcement agencies to protect against discrimination, protect wages and benefits, enforce health and safety safeguards, strengthen health care and pensions plans, and promote union organizing and collective bargaining.

CREATE GOOD-QUALITY JOBS THAT PAY PREVAILING WAGES IN SAFE AND HEALTHY WORKPLACES WHILE ENSURING WORKERS HAVE A FREE AND FAIR CHOICE TO ORGANIZE, JOIN A UNION, AND BARGAIN COLLECTIVELY WITH THEIR EMPLOYERS

As America works to recover from the devastating challenges of a deadly pandemic, an economic crisis, and a reckoning on race that reveals deep disparities, we need to summon a new wave of worker power to create an economy that works for everyone. We owe it not only to those who have put in a lifetime of work, but to the next generation of workers who have only known an America of rising inequality and shrinking opportunity. This is especially important for workers of color and for women, who have endured discrimination and systematic exclusion from economic opportunities for generations. All of us deserve to enjoy America’s promise in full — and our nation’s leaders have a responsibility to overcome racial, gender, and other inequalities to make it happen. To that end, the President is calling on Congress to create new, good-quality union jobs for American workers by leveraging their grit and ingenuity to address the climate crisis and build a sustainable infrastructure. Increased unionization can also impact our economic growth overall by improving productivity. President Biden’s plan will:

Empower Workers. President Biden is calling on Congress to update the social contract that provides workers with a fair shot to get ahead, overcome racial and other inequalities that have been barriers for too many Americans, expand the middle class, and strengthen communities. He is calling on Congress to ensure all workers have a free and fair choice to join a union by passing the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act, and guarantee union and bargaining rights for public service workers. His plan also ensures domestic workers receive the legal benefits and protections they deserve and tackles pay inequities based on gender.
Create good jobs. The President’s plan demands that employers benefitting from these investments follow strong labor standards and remain neutral when their employees seek to organize a union and bargain collectively. He is asking Congress to tie federal investments in clean energy and infrastructure to prevailing wages and require transportation investments to meet existing transit labor protections. He also is calling for investments tied to Project Labor, Community Workforce, local hire, and registered apprenticeships and other labor or labor-management training programs so that federal investments support good jobs and pathways to the middle class. Finally, he is asking Congress to include a commitment to increasing American jobs through Buy America and Ship American provisions.
Protect workers. President Biden is calling on Congress to provide the federal government with the tools it needs to ensure employers are providing workers with good jobs – including jobs with fair and equal pay, safe and healthy workplaces, and workplaces free from racial, gender, and other forms of discrimination and harassment. In addition to a $10 billion investment in enforcement as part of the plan’s workforce proposals, the President is calling for increased penalties when employers violate workplace safety and health rules.

Great Success,
I hope this helps,
_Pamela Knight
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Aisha’s Answer

Hello Savannah,

Remember, the sky is the limit! College is one avenue to a fulfilling career, but it's not the only road to success. There are countless other paths that can lead you to a rewarding job.

Here are some examples of fulfilling careers that don't necessitate a college degree:
- Electrician: Keep the world powered up!
- Commercial Pilot: Take to the skies!
- Firefighter: Be a real-life hero!
- Elevator Mechanic: Keep the world moving, one floor at a time!
- Executive Assistant: Be the backbone of a successful executive!
- Real Estate Agent: Help people find their dream homes!
- Mechanic: Keep the wheels turning!
- Police Officer: Serve and protect your community!
- Wind Turbine Technician: Harness the power of the wind!
- Medical Records Technician: Keep healthcare organized and efficient!
- Flight Attendant: Travel the world while working!
- Landscaper and Groundskeeper: Make the world a more beautiful place!
- Licensed Practical and Vocational Nurse: Provide essential care!
- Massage Therapist: Help people relax and heal!
- Aerospace Technician: Reach for the stars!
- Carpenter: Build the future!
- Mail Carrier: Deliver joy, one letter at a time!
- Medical Assistant: Be a vital part of the healthcare team!
- Patrol Officer: Keep your community safe!
- Plumber: Keep things flowing smoothly!
- Power Plant Operators: Keep the lights on!
- Sales Representative: Connect people with products they'll love!
- Subway and Streetcar Operators: Keep the city moving!
- Web Developer: Create the digital world!

Remember, your future is in your hands, and there are countless paths to success. Choose the one that's right for you!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Savannah!

Let's talk about Careers That Don’t Need a College Degree

Did you know there's a wide array of rewarding careers that don't require a college degree? Many of these roles offer competitive pay and room for growth. Here are some options to consider:

1. Skilled Trades: High-demand trades like electricians, plumbers, carpenters, and HVAC technicians offer stable and well-paying careers. These jobs often need apprenticeships or vocational training instead of a traditional college degree.

2. Healthcare Support Roles: There are many roles in healthcare, like medical assistants, dental assistants, phlebotomists, and home health aides, that don't need a college degree. These jobs usually require certification or on-the-job training.

3. Information Technology (IT): Many IT roles, such as computer support specialists, web developers, and network administrators, don't always require a college degree. Relevant certifications and proven skills can be enough to break into the field.

4. Real Estate Agents: To become a real estate agent, you typically need to complete a pre-licensing course and pass a state exam. Some college education can be helpful, but it's not always necessary.

5. Sales Representatives: Sales roles in various industries often don't have strict educational requirements. Success in sales is usually based on skills, experience, and the ability to build relationships with clients.

6. Commercial Truck Drivers: With a commercial driver’s license (CDL) from specialized training programs, you can pursue a career as a truck driver without a college degree.

7. Cosmetology and Esthetics: Careers in cosmetology and esthetics, like hairstylists, makeup artists, and skincare specialists, usually require completing a state-approved program and getting a license.

8. Administrative Support Roles: Jobs like administrative assistants, receptionists, and office clerks often don't require a college degree but do need relevant skills and experience.

9. Construction Managers: While some construction management roles may benefit from a degree or relevant certifications, many people enter this field through hands-on experience and on-the-job training.

10. Freelance Work: The rise of the gig economy has created freelance opportunities in fields like writing, graphic design, photography, and web development. These roles allow individuals to work without formal degrees by showcasing their portfolios and skills.

Remember to take care of your health, especially when life gets stressful. Maintaining a balanced diet can help ensure you're getting all the nutrients you need. Check out my BIO for a list of nutrient-rich food sources.

While these careers don't require a traditional college education, they often need specialized training, certification programs, apprenticeships, or on-the-job experience to build the necessary skills for success.

Top 3 Reference Publications or Domain Names Used:

- U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: This bureau provides extensive data on employment trends, job outlooks, and educational requirements for various jobs.
- Indeed.com: A leading job search website, Indeed offers insights into job requirements and qualifications across different industries.
- Trade Schools & Vocational Training: Information about vocational training programs for skilled trades careers was gathered from various trade schools’ websites.

These sources were used to ensure the information provided about non-college-degree career options is accurate and reliable.

Wishing you all the best!
James.
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Joe’s Answer

While many professions don't necessarily demand a degree, certain companies might.

Take for instance, trade jobs like plumbing, electrical work, or hairstyling. These fields typically don't require a degree, but they might necessitate some form of accreditation. Similarly, there are numerous jobs where a degree isn't a prerequisite, though individual companies might insist on one. Consider computer programming: you don't need a degree to excel in it. In fact, most of my programming skills were honed outside of college. My degree didn't significantly contribute to my actual job proficiency, but some companies do mandate a degree.

Don't let this discourage you! Remember, you can always channel your skills into entrepreneurship, provided they aren't in the legal or medical fields. Keep pushing forward, your skills and determination can open doors to a world of opportunities!
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Terry’s Answer

There are a lot of opportunities in the home building industry. All fields are available if you're willing to work hard and work your way up. With all jobs arrive early and leave late, show them that you are willing to learn. Show enthusiasm, no mater what they ask you to do. People notice your attitude and that you are always on time. Do these things and you'll be surprised how many doors open up.
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Grace’s Answer

Hi Savannah, great question! I think when people think of getting a job, they think of college as a step but I like to see college is a way to learn and then from your learnings, you end up getting a job.

Learning can come in many ways. For example, you can do training bootcamps (condensed learning programs what are more affordable), you can get a part time job or a full time job and learn along the way, you can volunteer to get experience and end up working in that field, you can start your own company and start a career that way.

Something I would encourage is to try as many things as you can, give it a go for at least 3 months and ask yourself: do i enjoy doing this? what do i enjoy about it? and can I see myself doing this for the next 2 years?

A lot of times employers ask what is your vision for 5-10 years but I feel in this era we are in, it's hard to predict what 5-10 years will look like anymore! we have jobs that didn't exist 5 years ago so stay flexible and stay curious!

Good luck Savannah!
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Rachael’s Answer

There's a wide variety of jobs available that don't necessitate having a college degree. Instead, you could consider exploring programs that provide a certificate or enroll in a vocational school.
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Oscar’s Answer

There are many jobs that do not require a formal college education, but before you decide you don't want to continue school, do a simple internet search on the average pay for a high school graduate, associates degree, bachelor's degree, and master's degree. When you see the cost/benefit of pay with each degree, you will realize it's worth it to continue education. Now if school is something you despise, but you are more of a hands on person, then maybe look into trade school. That means getting educated on working as an electrician, carpenter, construction, air conditioning/heating repair, mechanic. These types of jobs don't require much of a formal education, but are skilled jobs that can make a lot of money without a four year college degree. Good luck on you're career search!
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LEo’s Answer

Hi Savannah,
A few non-degree bearing options that pay more than most after college desk jobs are as follows:

- Welder
- Lineman (or woman)
- Electrician
- Truck driver (CDL-A)
- Millwright
- HVAC Technician
- Plumber

LEo recommends the following next steps:

Visit your local union shop
inquire about apprenticeships
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