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Should I pursue the science of economics if I'm not interested in business?

I'm not going to college to become a businessperson or investor or suchlike, but the science of #economics fascinates me. Are there enough opportunities for people in this area that getting a degree in economics isn't a silly idea for me? #business

Thank you comment icon Hi Daniel! Economics is truly a fascinating major to study, and do not worry about opportunities since there are plenty of them. Since you don't want to become a businessperson or investor, you have opportunities, such as economic analyst (who work for large companies), economic advisers, stock analyst, etc. If you find economics fascinating, then you will find a great career in the future which incorporates your passions. Ramtin

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Luis Alberto’s Answer

Hello, I understand what you mean. If what you are interested in is working in Policy, Research or Analysis in an NGO, Government, Think Thank or Private firm (yes some companies have internal analysis teams that are not meant to do "business", but economic research) then you should study an economic program strong in math. If you study a normal BS in Economics you run the risk in being targeted by the same companies that want an accountant or business finance person. In order to avoid that administrative business world, your best bet is to study Economics with a Quantitative emphasis.

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Preethi’s Answer

Economics has a large scope and if you are interested in numbers, you can certainly major in Accounting or Finance. Almost all companies have finance organization as a support organization and there are plenty of job opportunities to fill in this space. So it is not a bad idea to major in Economics if you are looking at a support function job.
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Syed’s Answer

Hi Daniel,

Economics is a fascinating discipline, and there are plenty of viable career paths, even if one is not interested in business. Economists are employed by universities, government (Federal Reserve, Treasury, etc.), banks, non-profits, industry trade groups, housing agencies (Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac), and many more. And if you change your mind, you can always major in business in graduate school!
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Richard’s Answer

My son studied economics and has received job offers in consulting/investment banking so I will answer from the perspective of his advice.

He was also not interested in the business/IBD route, but tried it.

He ended up finding Economic Consulting as a great middle ground -- intellectually challenging, but not as risky as a PhD. You should check it out!

Also, it's worth taking real analysis in college just so you don't rule yourself out of a PhD. Sounds like a PhD might be perfect for your interests!
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Matthew’s Answer

Hi Daniel!

Yes, absolutely you can use Economics in a non-Business environment.

Economics is a broad major and is a starting point for a lot of different careers. I'm a prime example. I studied Economics and now work in IT as a Product Manager. For example, here are some paths that you could take with an Economics major:

-Finance/Financial Analyst - Banking, division of a company. Usually, you'll learn on the job, but you'd incorporate some corporate finance and more
-Academic: If you're interested more in the theory (Monetary, Supply-Side, etc.), then pursuing a Masters or other academic work could be great.
-Quantitative Analyst - Like economics, but want more math as part of your work? These types of roles usually employ folks who have some interest in economics as well as a major like Math, Computer Science.
-Research Firm: If you're interested in general economic trends, how they affect the U.S. economy, consumer insights, you could find work at a firm such as McKinsey, Boston Consulting Group.
-Government: Great if you are more passionate about work that could affect decision making in our government. A NGO could always use such help. Additionally, if you see career interests as an economic advisor, chairman of the Fed, or want to be involved in large organizations such as the IMF and World, all could be pursued with a start here.

I'd say take a look at some of these and see what seems intriguing. Hopefully this helps!


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